Iriana Colorado

Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, United States

Are you Iriana Colorado?

Claim your profile

Publications (7)22.85 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Injurious non-microbial factors released from the stressed gut during shocked states contribute to the development of acute lung injury (ALI) and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Since Toll-like receptors (TLR) act as sensors of tissue injury as well as microbial invasion and TLR4 signaling occurs in both sepsis and noninfectious models of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, we hypothesized that factors in the intestinal mesenteric lymph after trauma hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) mediate gut-induced lung injury via TLR4 activation. The concept that factors in T/HS lymph exiting the gut recreates ALI is evidenced by our findings that the infusion of porcine lymph, collected from animals subjected to global T/HS injury, into naïve wildtype (WT) mice induced lung injury. Using C3H/HeJ mice that harbor a TLR4 mutation, we found that TLR4 activation was necessary for the development of T/HS porcine lymph-induced lung injury as determined by Evan's blue dye (EBD) lung permeability and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels as well as the induction of the injurious pulmonary iNOS response. TRIF and Myd88 deficiency fully and partially attenuated T/HS lymph-induced increases in lung permeability respectively. Additional studies in TLR2 deficient mice showed that TLR2 activation was not involved in the pathology of T/HS lymph-induced lung injury. Lastly, the lymph samples were devoid of bacteria, endotoxin and bacterial DNA and passage of lymph through an endotoxin removal column did not abrogate the ability of T/HS lymph to cause lung injury in naïve mice. Our findings suggest that non-microbial factors in the intestinal mesenteric lymph after T/HS are capable of recreating T/HS-induced lung injury via TLR4 activation.
    PLoS ONE 01/2011; 6(8):e14829. · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Gut injury and loss of normal intestinal barrier function are key elements in the paradigm of gut-origin systemic inflammatory response syndrome, acute lung injury, and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). As hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) is a critical determinant of the physiological and pathophysiological response to hypoxia and ischemia, we asked whether HIF-1 plays a proximal role in the induction of gut injury and subsequent lung injury. Using partially HIF-1α-deficient mice in an isolated superior mesenteric artery occlusion (SMAO) intestinal ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury model (45 min SMAO followed by 3 h of reperfusion), we showed a direct relationship between HIF-1 activation and intestinal I/R injury. Specifically, partial HIF-1α deficiency attenuated SMAO-induced increases in intestinal permeability, lipid peroxidation, mucosal caspase-3 activity, and IL-1β mRNA levels. Furthermore, partial HIF-1α deficiency prevented the induction of ileal mucosal inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein levels after SMAO and iNOS deficiency ameliorated SMAO-induced villus injury. Resistance to SMAO-induced gut injury was also associated with resistance to lung injury, as reflected by decreased levels of myeloperoxidase, IL-6 and IL-10 in the lungs of HIF-1α(+/-) mice. In contrast, a short duration of SMAO (15 min) followed by 3 h of reperfusion neither induced mucosal HIF-1α protein levels nor caused significant gut and lung injury in wild-type or HIF-1α(+/-) mice. This study indicates that intestinal HIF-1 activation is a proximal regulator of I/R-induced gut mucosal injury and gut-induced lung injury. However, the duration and severity of the gut I/R insult dictate whether HIF-1 plays a gut-protective or deleterious role.
    AJP Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology 12/2010; 300(5):G853-61. · 3.65 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Acute lung injury (ALI) and the development of the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) are major causes of death in trauma patients. Gut inflammation and loss of gut barrier function as a consequence of splanchnic ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) have been implicated as the initial triggering events that contribute to the development of the systemic inflammatory response, ALI, and MODS. Since hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) is a key regulator of the physiological and pathophysiological response to hypoxia, we asked whether HIF-1 plays a proximal role in the induction of gut injury and subsequent lung injury. Utilizing partially HIF-1α-deficient mice in a global trauma hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) model, we found that HIF-1 activation was necessary for the development of gut injury and that the prevention of gut injury was associated with an abrogation of lung injury. Specifically, in vivo studies demonstrated that partial HIF-1α deficiency ameliorated T/HS-induced increases in intestinal permeability, bacterial translocation, and caspase-3 activation. Lastly, partial HIF-1α deficiency reduced TNF-α, IL-1β, cyclooxygenase-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase levels in the ileal mucosa after T/HS whereas IL-1β mRNA levels were reduced in the lung after T/HS. This study indicates that prolonged intestinal HIF-1 activation is a proximal regulator of I/R-induced gut mucosal injury and gut-induced lung injury. Consequently, these results provide unique information on the initiating events in trauma-hemorrhagic shock-induced ALI and MODS as well as potential therapeutic insights.
    AJP Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology 10/2010; 299(4):G833-43. · 3.65 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Acute lung injury (ALI) and the development of the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) is a major cause of death in trauma patients. Earlier studies in trauma hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) have documented that splanchnic ischemia leading to gut inflammation and loss of barrier function is an initial triggering event that leads to gut-induced ARDS and MODS. Since sex hormones have been shown to modulate the response to T/HS and proestrous (PE) females are more resistant to T/HS-induced gut and distant organ injury, the goal of our study was to determine the contribution of estrogen receptor (ER)alpha and ERbeta in modulating the protective response of female rats to T/HS-induced gut and lung injury. The incidence of gut and lung injury was assessed in PE and ovariectomized (OVX) female rats subjected to T/HS or trauma sham shock (T/SS) as well as OVX rats that were administered estradiol (E2) or agonists for ERalpha or ERbeta immediately prior to resuscitation. Marked gut and lung injury was observed in OVX rats subjected to T/HS as compared to PE rats or E2-treated OVX rats subjected to T/HS. Both ERalpha and ERbeta agonists were equally effective in limiting T/HS-induced morphologic villous injury and bacterial translocation, whereas the ERbeta agonist was more effective than the ERalpha agonist in limiting T/HS-induced lung injury as determined by histology, Evan's blue lung permeability, bronchoalevolar fluid/plasma protein ratio and myeloperoxidase levels. Similarly, treatment with either E2 or the ERbeta agonist attenuated the induction of the intestinal iNOS response in OVX rats subjected to T/HS whereas the ERalpha agonist was only partially protective. Our study demonstrates that estrogen attenuates T/HS-induced gut and lung injury and that its protective effects are mediated by the activation of ERalpha, ERbeta or both receptors.
    PLoS ONE 01/2010; 5(2):e9421. · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Decreased red blood cell (RBC) deformability and activation of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes [PMN]) after trauma-hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) have been implicated in the development of multiple organ dysfunction. Experimentally, female animals seemed to be protected from the effects of T/HS, at least in part, because of elevated estrogen levels. Thus, we examined the relative role of estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha and -beta in this protective response. To accomplish this goal, RBC deformability and neutrophil respiratory burst activity were measured in several groups of hormonally intact or ovariectomized (OVX) female rats subjected to T/HS (laparotomy plus hemorrhage to an MAP of 30 mm Hg to 35 mm Hg for 90 minutes) or trauma-sham shock (T/SS) and 3 hours of reperfusion. These groups included rats receiving vehicle, estradiol, or either an ER-alpha agonist or an ER-beta agonist administered at the end of the shock period just before volume resuscitation. RBC deformability and neutrophil activation were similar among all the T/SS groups and were not different from that observed in the non-OVX female rats subjected to T/HS. In contrast, RBC deformability was reduced and neutrophil activation was increased in the OVX, T/HS female rats as compared with the T/SS groups or the non-OVX, T/HS rats. The administration of estrogen to the T/HS, OVX rats returned RBC and neutrophil function to normal. Both the ER-alpha and -beta agonist partially, but not completely, protected the OVX rats from T/HS-induced loss of RBC deformability, whereas only the ER-beta agonist prevented the increase in neutrophil activation. The protective effects of estrogen on T/HS-induced RBC deformability are mediated, at least in part, via activation of both ER-alpha and -beta, whereas ER-beta activation is involved in limiting T/HS-induced neutrophil activation.
    The Journal of trauma 01/2010; 68(1):35-41. · 2.35 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Intestinal ischemia after trauma-hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) results in gut barrier dysfunction and the production/release of biologically active and tissue injurious factors in the mesenteric lymph, which, in turn, causes acute lung injury and a systemic inflammatory state. Since T/HS-induced lung injury is associated with pulmonary endothelial and epithelial cell programmed cell death (PCD) and was abrogated by mesenteric lymph duct ligation, we sought to investigate the cellular pathways involved. Compared with trauma-sham shock (T/SS) rats, a significant increase in caspase-3 and M30 expression was detected in the pulmonary epithelial cells undergoing PCD, whereas apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), but not caspase-3, was detected in endothelial cells undergoing PCD. This AIF-mediated pulmonary endothelial PCD response was validated in an in situ femoral vein assay where endothelial cells were found to express AIF but not caspase-3. To complement these studies, human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC), human lung microvascular endothelial cell (HLMEC), and human alveolar type II epithelial cell (A549) lines were used as in vitro models. T/HS lymph induced the nuclear translocation of AIF in HUVEC and HLMEC, and caspase inhibition in these cells did not afford any cytoprotection. For proof of principle, AIF silencing in HUVEC reversed the cytotoxic effects of T/HS on cell viability and DNA fragmentation. In A549 cells, T/HS lymph activated caspase-3-mediated apoptosis, which was partially abrogated by N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp (zVAD). Additionally, T/HS lymph did not cause the nuclear translocation of AIF in A549 cells. Collectively, T/HS-induced pulmonary endothelial PCD occurs via an AIF-dependent caspase-independent pathway, whereas epithelial cells undergo apoptosis by a caspase-dependent pathway.
    AJP Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology 01/2009; 296(3):L404-17. · 3.52 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The etiology of trauma-hemorrhagic shock (T/HS)-induced acute lung injury has been difficult to elucidate because of, at least in part, the inability of in vivo studies to separate the noninjurious pulmonary effects of trauma-hemorrhage from the tissue-injurious ones. To circumvent this in vivo limitation, we used a model of T/HS in which T/HS lung injury was abrogated by dividing the mesenteric lymph duct. In this way, it was possible to separate the pulmonary injurious response from the noninjurious systemic response to T/HS by comparing the pulmonary molecular responses of rats subjected to T/HS, which did and did not develop lung injury, with those of nonshocked rats. Using high-density oligonucleotide arrays and treatment group comparisons of whole lung tissue collected at 3 h after the end of the shock or sham-shock period, 139 of 8,799 assessed genes were identified by significant analysis of microarrays. Hemorrhage without the secondary effects of lung injury modulated the expression of 21 genes such as interleukin 1beta, metallothionein-2, and myeloctomatosis oncogene (c-myc). In response to injury, 42 genes were identified to be differentially expressed. Upregulated genes included the L1 retroposon and guanine deaminase, whereas downregulated genes included catalase and superoxide dismutase 1. Real-time polymerase chain reaction confirmed the differential expression for selected genes. PathwayAssist analysis identified interleukin 1beta as a central regulator of two subpathways of stress response-related genes (c-myc and superoxide dismutase 1/catalase) as well as several unrelated genes such as lipoprotein lipase. Our model system provided a unique opportunity to distinguish the molecular changes associated with T/HS-induced acute lung injury from the systemic molecular response to T/HS.
    Shock 10/2007; 28(3):360-8. · 2.61 Impact Factor