Jaime S Brahim

University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

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Publications (45)218.31 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: No conventional therapy exists for salivary hypofunction in surviving head and neck cancer patients with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late grade 2-3 toxicity. We conducted a phase I clinical trial to test the safety and biologic efficacy of serotype 5, adenoviral-mediated aquaporin-1 cDNA transfer to a single previously irradiated parotid gland in 11 subjects using an open label, single-dose, dose-escalation design (AdhAQP1 vector; four dose tiers from 4.8 × 10(7) to 5.8 × 10(9) vector particles per gland). Treated subjects were followed at scheduled intervals. Multiple safety parameters were measured and biologic efficacy was evaluated with measurements of parotid salivary flow rate. Symptoms were assessed with a visual analog scale. All subjects tolerated vector delivery and study procedures well over the 42-d study period reported. No deaths, serious adverse events, or dose-limiting toxicities occurred. Generally, few adverse events occurred, and all were considered mild or moderate. No consistent changes were found in any clinical chemistry and hematology parameters measured. Objective responses were seen in six subjects, all at doses <5.8 × 10(9) vector particles per gland. Five of these six subjects also experienced subjective improvement in xerostomia. AdhAQP1 vector delivery to a single parotid gland was safe and transfer of the hAQP1 cDNA increased parotid flow and relieved symptoms in a subset of subjects.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 11/2012; · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Parathyroid hormone (PTH) has variable actions on bone. Chronically increased PTH is catabolic and leads to osteoporosis; yet intermittent administration is anabolic and increases bone mass. PTH deficiency is associated with decreased bone remodeling and increased bone mass. However, the effects of PTH replacement therapy on bone in hypoparathyroidism are not well known. We discontinued calcitriol therapy and treated 5 hypoparathyroid subjects (2 adults and 3 adolescents) with synthetic human PTH 1-34 (hPTH 1-34), injected two to three times daily for 18 months, with doses individualized to maintain serum calcium at 1.9 to 2.25 mmol/L. Biochemical markers and bone mineral density (BMD) were assessed every 6 months; iliac-crest biopsies were performed before and after 1 year of treatment. hPTH 1-34 therapy significantly increased bone markers to supranormal levels. Histomorphometry revealed that treatment dramatically increased cancellous bone volume and trabecular number and decreased trabecular separation. Changes in trabecular width were variable, suggesting that the increase in trabecular number was due to the observed intratrabecular tunneling. Cortical width remained unchanged; however, hPTH 1-34 treatment increased cortical porosity. Cancellous bone remodeling was also stimulated, inducing significant changes in osteoid, mineralizing surface, and bone formation rate. Similar changes were seen in endocortical and intracortical remodeling. BMD Z-scores were unchanged at the spine and femoral neck. Total hip Z-scores increased; however, total body BMD Z-scores decreased during the first 6 months of treatment and then stabilized, remaining significantly decreased compared to baseline. Radial Z-scores also decreased with treatment; this was most pronounced in the growing adolescent. Daily hPTH 1-34 therapy for hypoparathyroidism stimulated bone turnover, increased bone volume, and altered bone structure in the iliac crest. These findings suggest that treatment with hPTH 1-34 in hypoparathyroid adults and adolescents has varying effects in the different skeletal compartments, leading to an increase in trabecular bone and an apparent trabecularization of cortical bone.
    Journal of bone and mineral research: the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research 04/2012; 27(8):1811-20. · 6.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Kinins play an important role in regulation of pain and hyperalgesia after tissue injury and inflammation by activating two types of G-protein-coupled receptors, the kinin B1 and B2 receptors. It is generally accepted that the B2 receptor is constitutively expressed, whereas the B1 receptor is induced in response to inflammation. However, little is known about the regulatory effects of kinin receptors on the onset of acute inflammation and inflammatory pain in humans. The present study investigated the changes in gene expression of kinin receptors and the levels of their endogenous ligands at an early time point following tissue injury and their relation to clinical pain, as well as the effect of COX-inhibition on their expression levels. Tissue injury resulted in a significant up-regulation in the gene expression of B1 and B2 receptors at 3 hours post-surgery, the onset of acute inflammatory pain. Interestingly, the up-regulation in the gene expression of B1 and B2 receptors was positively correlated to pain intensity only after ketorolac treatment, signifying an interaction between prostaglandins and kinins in the inflammatory pain process. Further, the gene expression of both B1 and B2 receptors were correlated. Following tissue injury, B1 ligands des-Arg9-BK and des-Arg10-KD were significantly lower at the third hour compared to the first 2 hours in both the placebo and the ketorolac treatment groups but did not differ significantly between groups. Tissue injury also resulted in the down-regulation of TRPV1 gene expression at 3 hours post-surgery with no significant effect by ketorolac treatment. Interestingly, the change in gene expression of TRPV1 was correlated to the change in gene expression of B1 receptor but not B2 receptor. These results provide evidence at the transcriptional level in a clinical model of tissue injury that up-regulation of kinin receptors are involved in the development of the early phase of inflammation and inflammatory pain. The up-regulation of B1 receptors may contribute to acute inflammatory pain through TRPV1 activation.
    Molecular Pain 02/2010; 6:12. · 3.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The role that nitric oxide (NO) plays in modulating pain in the periphery is unclear. We show here, the results of two independent clinical studies (microdialysis and gene expression studies) and a pilot dose finding study (glyceryl trinitrate study), to study the role of NO in the early phase of acute inflammatory pain following oral surgery. The effect of ketorolac on NO production and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) gene expression was also studied. Microdialysis samples showed significantly higher levels of NO at the first 100 min compared to the last 80 minutes in the placebo treated group. In the ketorolac group, on the other hand, NO levels gradually decreased over the first 60 min but were similar to placebo over the later 100-180 min, with no significant change in NO level over time. The levels of NO were negatively correlated to pain intensity scores. Local infusion of the NO donor glyceryl trinitrate at the site of surgery, showed a small analgesic effect that did not reach statistical significance in the sample size used. While the gene expression of iNOS and eNOS were not up-regulated, 3 hours after surgery, nNOS was downregulated in both treatment groups and eNOS gene expression was significantly lower in the ketorolac group compared to the placebo group. Further, there was a positive correlation between the change in gene expression of nNOS and eNOS in the placebo group but not in the ketorolac group. We suggest that at this early stage of inflammatory pain in man, NO is analgesic in the periphery. Further, ketorolac down-regulates eNOS gene expression.
    Molecular Pain 01/2010; 6:55. · 3.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Irradiation damage to salivary glands is a common iatrogenic consequence of treatment for head and neck cancers. The subsequent lack of saliva production leads to many functional and quality-of-life problems for affected patients and there is no effective conventional therapy. To address this problem, we developed an in vivo gene therapy strategy involving viral vector-mediated transfer of the aquaporin-1 cDNA to irradiation-damaged glands and successfully tested it in two pre-clinical models (irradiated rats and miniature pigs), as well as demonstrated its safety in a large toxicology and biodistribution study. Thereafter, a clinical research protocol was developed that has received approval from all required authorities in the United States. Patients are currently being enrolled in this study.
    Handbook of experimental pharmacology 02/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: Autosomal dominant hypocalcemia (ADH) is an inherited form of hypoparathyroidism caused by activating mutations in the calcium-sensing receptor (CaR). Treatment with PTH(1-34) may be superior to conventional therapy but is contraindicated in children, and long-term effects on the skeleton are unknown. The patient is a 20-yr-old female with ADH treated with PTH continuously since 6 yr and 2 mo of age. A bone biopsy was obtained for histomorphometry and quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI). Her data were compared with one age-, sex-, and length of hypoparathyroidism-matched control not on PTH and two sex-matched ADH controls before and after 1 yr of PTH. The patient's growth was normal. Hypercalciuria and hypermagnesuria persisted despite normal or subnormal serum calcium and magnesium levels. Nephrocalcinosis, without evidence of impaired renal function, developed by 19 yr of age. Cancellous bone volume was dramatically elevated in the patient and in ADH controls after 1 yr of PTH. BMD distribution (BMDD) by qBEI of the patient and ADH controls was strikingly shifted toward lower mineralization compared with the non-ADH control. Moreover, the ADH controls exhibited a further reduction in mineralization after 1 yr of PTH. These findings imply a role for CaR in bone matrix mineralization. There were no fractures or osteosarcoma. In conclusion, long-term PTH replacement in a child with ADH was not unsafe, increased bone mass without negatively impacting mineralization, and improved serum mineral control but did not prevent nephrocalcinosis. Additionally, this may be the first evidence of a role for CaR in human bone.
    Journal of bone and mineral research: the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research 01/2009; 24(5):964-73. · 6.04 Impact Factor
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    Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery: official journal of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons 11/2008; 66(10):2161-3. · 1.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In addition to blocking nociceptive input from surgical sites, long-acting local anesthetics might directly modulate inflammation. In the present study, we describe the proinflammatory effects of bupivacaine on local prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production and cyclooxygenase (COX) gene expression that increases postoperative pain in human subjects. Subjects (n = 114) undergoing extraction of impacted third molars received either 2% lidocaine or 0.5% bupivacaine before surgery and either rofecoxib 50 mg or placebo orally 90 min before surgery and for the following 48 h. Oral mucosal biopsies were taken before surgery and 48 h after surgery. After extraction, a microdialysis probe was placed at the surgical site for PGE2 and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) measurements. The bupivacaine/rofecoxib group reported significantly less pain, as assessed by a visual analog scale, compared with the other three treatment groups over the first 4 h. However, the bupivacaine/placebo group reported significantly more pain at 24 h and PGE2 levels during the first 4 h were significantly higher than the other three treatment groups. Moreover, bupivacaine significantly increased COX-2 gene expression at 48 h as compared with the lidocaine/placebo group. Thromboxane levels were not significantly affected by any of the treatments, indicating that the effects seen were attributable to inhibition of COX-2, but not COX-1. These results suggest that bupivacaine stimulates COX-2 gene expression after tissue injury, which is associated with higher PGE2 production and pain after the local anesthetic effect dissipates.
    Anesthesia and analgesia 02/2008; 106(1):321-7, table of contents. · 3.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Acetaminophen is widely used for pain management as an alternative to NSAIDs and selective COX-2 inhibitors, but its action at a molecular level is still unclear. We evaluated acetaminophen's effect on PG release and the expression patterns of genes related to PG production in a clinical model of tissue injury and acute inflammation. Subjects (119 outpatients) received either 1000 mg acetaminophen, 50 mg rofecoxib (a selective COX-2 inhibitor), 30 mg ketorolac (a dual COX-1/COX-2 inhibitor), or placebo before the surgical removal of two impacted mandibular third molars. Microdialysis was used to collect inflammatory transudate from the surgical site for measurement of PGE2 and TXB2 levels at the site of injury. Biopsies were collected to investigate the expression patterns of genes related to PG production at baseline prior to surgery and at 3 or 24 h following surgery. PGE2 release was suppressed by ketorolac, rofecoxib and acetaminophen compared to placebo at 3 h coincident with increased COX-2 gene expression in biopsies collected from the surgical site. TXB2 release was suppressed only by ketorolac. COX-2 gene expression remained elevated at 24 h with continued ketorolac and acetaminophen treatment. COX-1 gene expression was significantly down-regulated at 24 h by ketorolac, rofecoxib and acetaminophen. Acetaminophen suppression of PGE2 without inhibiting TXB2 release, when COX-2 gene expression is up-regulated, suggests that acetaminophen is a selective COX-2 inhibitor in vivo. The up-regulation of COX-2 gene and down-regulation of COX-1 gene expression suggests that acetaminophen may result in changes in COX-derived prostanoids with repeated doses.
    Pain 07/2007; 129(3):279-86. · 5.64 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 07/2007; 65(6):1219-22. · 1.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The treatment of most patients with head and neck cancer includes ionizing radiation (IR). Salivary glands in the IR field suffer significant and irreversible damage, leading to considerable morbidity. Previously, we reported that adenoviral (Ad)-mediated transfer of the human aquaporin-1 (hAQP1) cDNA to rat [C. Delporte, B.C. O'Connell, X. He, H.E. Lancaster, A.C. O'Connell, P. Agre, B.J. Baum, Increased fluid secretion after adenoviral-mediated transfer of the aquaporin-1 cDNA to irradiated rat salivary glands. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U S A. 94 (1997) 3268-3273] and miniature pig [Z. Shan, J. Li, C. Zheng, X. Liu, Z. Fan, C. Zhang, C.M. Goldsmith, R.B. Wellner, B.J Baum, S. Wang. Increased fluid secretion after adenoviral-mediated transfer of the human aquaporin-1 cDNA to irradiated miniature pig parotid glands. Mol. Ther. 11 (2005) 444-451] salivary glands approximately 16 weeks following IR resulted in a dose-dependent increase in salivary flow to > or =80% control levels on day 3. A control Ad vector was without any significant effect on salivary flow. Additionally, after administration of Ad vectors to salivary glands, no significant lasting effects were observed in multiple measured clinical chemistry and hematology values. Taken together, the findings show that localized delivery of AdhAQP1 to IR-damaged salivary glands is useful in transiently increasing salivary secretion in both small and large animal models, without significant general adverse events. Based on these results, we are developing a clinical trial to test if the hAQP1 cDNA transfer strategy will be clinically effective in restoring salivary flow in patients with IR-induced parotid hypofunction.
    Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 09/2006; 1758(8):1071-7. · 4.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Autologous grafts from axial and appendicular bones commonly used to repair orofacial bone defects often result in unfavorable outcome. This clinical observation, along with the fact that many bone abnormalities are limited to craniofacial bones, suggests that there are significant differences in bone metabolism in orofacial, axial and appendicular bones. It is plausible that these differences are dictated by site-specificity of embryological progenitor cells and osteogenic properties of resident multipotent human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs). This study investigated skeletal site-specific phenotypic and functional differences between orofacial (maxilla and mandible) and axial (iliac crest) hBMSCs in vitro and in vivo. Primary cultures of maxilla, mandible and iliac crest hBMSCs were established with and without osteogenic inducers. Site-specific characterization included colony forming efficiency, cell proliferation, life span before senescence, relative presence of surface markers, adipogenesis, osteogenesis and transplantation in immunocompromised mice to compare bone regenerative capacity. Compared with iliac crest cells, orofacial hBMSCs (OF-MSCs) proliferated more rapidly with delayed senescence, expressed higher levels of alkaline phosphatase and demonstrated more calcium accumulation in vitro. Cells isolated from the three skeletal sites were variably positive for STRO 1, a marker of hBMSCs. OF-MSCs formed more bone in vivo, while iliac crest hBMSCs formed more compacted bone that included hematopoietic tissue and were more responsive in vitro and in vivo to osteogenic and adipogenic inductions. These data demonstrate that hBMSCs from the same individuals differ in vitro and in vivo in a skeletal site-specific fashion and identified orofacial marrow stromal cells as unique cell populations. Further understanding of site-specific properties of hBMSCs and their impact on site-specific bone diseases and regeneration are needed.
    Bone 07/2006; 38(6):758-68. · 4.46 Impact Factor
  • Gary Warburton, Jaime S Brahim
    Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 05/2006; 64(4):700-4. · 1.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The use of hematopoetic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has greatly expanded in the recent years for many neoplastic and hematological disorders. Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) is a major complication of allogeneic HSCT and a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Oral mucosal involvement is frequent in cGVHD and contributes significantly to the overall burden of the condition. Oral medicine professionals should be familiar with various treatment options for oral cGVHD. This review discusses treatment modalities available for the management of oral mucosal manifestations of cGVHD. Available evidence for efficacy and safety of various systemic and topical agents, including corticosteroids, calcineurin antagonists, mycophenolate mofetil, and extracorporeal photopheresis, is reviewed.
    Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontology 03/2006; 101(2):175-83. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bisphosphonates administered orally and intravenously are used for a variety of endocrine and oncologic indications. Long-term intravenous use of bisphosphonates has been shown to cause osteonecrosis of the jaw. We report a case in which a 58-year-old woman with metastatic breast cancer received 18 doses of 4 mg intravenous zoledronic acid over a period of 16 months and developed a region of osteonecrosis on the posterior edge of a large, lobular torus palatinus. Torus palatinus, a type of maxillary exostosis, is common among postmenopausal women, and is vulnerable to blunt trauma that could predispose to osteonecrosis. Sequestrum of dead bone was removed and the site healed within 4 weeks. This case demonstrates that patients with a torus palatinus may be at high risk for osteonecrosis, and reinforces the need for good oral hygiene and frequent dental examination while receiving bisphosphonate therapy.
    Oncology 02/2006; 71(3-4):306-8. · 2.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Candidate gene studies on the basis of biological hypotheses have been a practical approach to identify relevant genetic variation in complex traits. Based on previous reports and the roles in pain pathways, we have examined the effects of variations of loci in the genes of monoamine neurotransmitter systems including metabolizing enzymes, receptors and transporters on acute clinical pain responses in humans. Variations in the catecholamine metabolizing enzyme genes (MAOA and COMT) showed significant associations with the maximum post-operative pain rating while the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) showed association with the onset time of post-operative pain. Analgesic onset time after medication was significantly associated with the norepinephrine transporter gene (SLC6A2). However, the association between COMT genetic variation and pain sensitivity in our study differ from previous studies with small sample sizes, population stratification and pain phenotype derived from combining different types of pain stimuli. Correcting for multiple comparisons did not sustain these genetic associations between monoamine neurotransmitter systems and pain sensitivity even in this large and homogeneous sample. These results suggest that the previously reported associations between genetic polymorphisms in the monoamine neurotransmitter systems and the interindividual variability in pain responses cannot be replicated in a clinically relevant pain phenotype.
    Molecular Pain 02/2006; 2:24. · 3.77 Impact Factor
  • Jaime S Brahim
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    ABSTRACT: Some children and adolescents have anodontia, partial anodontia, congenitally missing teeth, and lost teeth as a result of trauma, and they may benefit from early placement of dental implants. Clinicians should have an understanding of the potential risks involved in placing implants in jaws that are still growing and developing and consider the effect that implants have on craniofacial growth. Implants may act as ankylotic teeth and fail to move together with the surrounding structures, which produces an infraocclusion that leads to difficulties with prosthetics. Young patients may require general anesthesia for the procedure and there may be limited cooperation in maintaining good oral hygiene.
    Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America 12/2005; 17(4):375-81. · 0.73 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Pain 03/2005; 6(3). · 3.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Variability relating to pain sensitivity, perception and tolerance has been documented; however, the exact role of genetics in the interpretation and expression of pain is currently unknown. Given the prominent role of cyclooxygenase (COX) in the inflammatory responses to tissue injury, we examined the influence of common genetic polymorphisms of COX-1 and COX-2 genes on the modulation of responses to clinically induced pain in humans.Methods: Patients (N=200) undergoing third molar removal provided ratings of pain intensity every 20 minutes postoperatively using a 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS). Upon patient request at the onset of moderate-severe pain, an NSAID (ketorolac) was administered. The effect of genetic variation was investigated with 5 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the COX-1 gene and 9 SNPs in the COX-2 gene.Results: COX-2 gene SNPs, including promoter variant -765G>C, show significant association for time to onset of post-operative pain and analgesic onset time (ANOVA, p<.05). Slight but significant (3.4 - 4.8%) variation in post-operative pain measures can be attributed to these SNPs. We did not detect any influence of individual SNPs in the COX-1 gene on pain in this clinical model.Conclusions: COX-2 gene polymorphisms contribute to post-operative pain responses and may explain variation in pain responses between individuals following tissue injury and during COX-2 mediated acute inflammation.
    Clinical Pharmacology &#38 Therapeutics 01/2005; 77(2):P20-P20. · 6.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tissue injury in the oral mucosa activates a cascade of transcriptional events important during the healing process that are not yet clearly defined. To characterize these events and identify potential gene targets for future studies, we used cDNA expression arrays in a clinical model of tissue injury. Mucosal biopsies were taken before third molar extraction, 2-4 hours postoperatively, or at 48 hours. Hybridization patterns were analyzed and validated using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Prior to extraction, the biopsied mucosal tissues were characterized by a panoply of genes that were constitutively expressed. After injury, analysis revealed differential expression of genes involved in transcription, inflammation, and remodeling. At 2-4 hours after injury, genes such as Fos, Jun, and early growth response protein were up-regulated, while genes responsible for intercellular adhesion were down-regulated. At 48 hours after injury, the gene profile had shifted toward tissue remodeling. Here we identify genes constitutively expressed in normal oral mucosa and transcriptional events following mucosal tissue injury, which may be useful in identifying new therapeutic targets.
    Wound Repair and Regeneration 01/2005; 13(1):19-26. · 2.76 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

3k Citations
218.31 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • University of Maryland Medical Center
      • Department of Oral-Maxillofacial Surgery
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 2008–2012
    • University of Maryland, Baltimore
      • Department of Oral-Maxillofacial Surgery
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
    • Rutgers New Jersey Medical School
      • Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
      Newark, NJ, United States
  • 2002–2007
    • National Institutes of Health
      • • Center for Clinical Research
      • • Branch of Medical Oncology Branch and Affiliates
      • • Branch of Craniofacial and Skeletal Diseases
      Bethesda, MD, United States
    • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
      • School of Dentistry
      Chapel Hill, NC, United States