Hideo Kohka Takahashi

Kinki University, Ōsaka, Ōsaka, Japan

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Publications (40)125.45 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Cell-cell interaction through binding of adhesion molecules on monocytes to their ligands on T-cells plays roles in cytokine production and lymphocyte proliferation. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), an abundant and conserved nuclear protein, acts in the extracellular environment as a primary pro-inflammatory signal. HMGB1 induces expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM), B7.1, B7.2 and CD40 on monocytes, resulting in production of interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production and lymphocyte proliferation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Histamine inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokine production via histamine H2-receptors; however, it is not known whether histamine inhibits HMGB1 activity. This study was designed to study the inhibitory effect of histamine on HMGB1 activity. We examined the effect of histamine on HMGB1-induced expression of ICAM-1, B7.1, B7.2 and CD40 on moncytes, production of IFN-γ and TNF-α and lymphocyte proliferation in PBMCs. Histamine inhibited HMGB1 activity in a concentration-dependent manner. The effects of histamine were partially ablated by the H2-receptor antagonist, famotidine, and mimicked by the H2/H4-receptor agonists, dimaprit and 4-methylhistamine. Histamine induced cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production in the presence and absence of HMGB1. The effects of histamine were reversed by the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H89, and mimicked by the membrane-permeable cAMP analog, dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP), and the adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin. These results together indicated that histamine inhibited HMGB1 activity.
    European journal of pharmacology 09/2013; · 2.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cell-cell interaction through binding of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM), B7.1, B7.2 and CD40 on monocytes to their ligands on T-cells plays a number of roles in cytokine . High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), an abundant and conserved nuclproduction and lymphocyte proliferationear protein, acts in the extracellular environment as a primary pro-inflammatory signal. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 and TLR-4 are receptors for HMGB1. HMGB1 induces pro-inflammatory cytokine production in monocytes and T-cells. This study was designed to study the cellular mechanism of cytokine production. HMGB1 concentration-dependently induced ICAM-1, B7.1, B7.2 and CD40 expression on monocytes, and interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production and lymphocyte proliferation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). These HMGB1 activities depended on the stimulation of RAGE on monocytes. HMGB1 also up-regulated RAGE, but not TLR-2 or TLR-4, expression on monocytes, which was inhibited by antibodies (Abs) against ICAM-1, B7.1, B7.2 and CD40. These results together indicated that HMGB1 could induce an intimate cellular interplay between monocytes and T-cells in PBMCs through the stimulation and up-regulation of RAGE and other adhesive molecules on monocytes.
    European journal of pharmacology 12/2012; · 2.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Posttransplant diabetes mellitus is a frequent complication among transplant recipients. Ligation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) with their receptor on monocytes/macrophages plays a role in diabetes complications. The enhancement of adhesion molecule expression on monocytes/macrophages activates T cells, reducing allograft survival. In previous work, we found that toxic AGEs, AGE-2 and AGE-3, induced the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1, B7.1, B7.2, and CD40 on monocytes, production of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor alpha, and lymphocyte proliferation during human mixed lymphocyte reaction. AGE-induced up-regulation of adhesion molecule expression was involved in cytokine production and lymphocyte proliferation. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentration-dependently inhibited the actions of AGE-2 and AGE-3. The effects of PGE2 were mimicked by an EP2 receptor agonist, ONO-AE1-259-01 (11,15-O-dimethyl PGE2), and an EP4 receptor agonist, ONO-AE1-329 [16-(3-methoxymethyl)phenyl-omega-tetranor-3,7dithia PGE1]. An EP2 receptor antagonist, AH6809 (6-isopropoxy-9-oxaxanthene-2-carboxylic acid), and an EP4 receptor antagonist, AH23848 [(4Z)-7-[(rel-1S,2S,5R)-5-((1,1'-biphenyl-4-yl)methoxy)-2-(4-morpholinyl)-3-oxocyclopentyl]-4-heptenoic acid], inhibited the actions of PGE2. The stimulation of EP2 and EP4 receptors is reported to increase cAMP levels. The effects of PGE2 were reversed by protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors and mimicked by dibutyryl cAMP and an adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin. These results as a whole indicate that PGE2 inhibited the actions of AGE-2 and AGE-3 via EP2/EP4 receptors and the cAMP/PKA pathway.
    Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics 09/2010; 334(3):964-72. · 3.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The up-regulation of adhesion molecule expressions on monocytes enhances cell-to-cell interactions with T cells, leading to cytokine production. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are modifications of proteins/lipids that become nonenzymatically glycated after contact with aldose sugars. Among various subtypes of AGEs, glyceraldehyde-derived AGE (AGE-2) and glycolaldehyde-derived AGE (AGE-3) induce the expressions of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, B7.1, B7.2, and CD40 on monocytes, the production of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and the lymphocyte proliferation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Nicotine is reported to inhibit the activation of monocytes via nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha7 subunit (alpha7-nAChR). In the present study, we found that nicotine inhibited the actions of AGE-2 and AGE-3. A nonselective and selective alpha7-nAChR antagonist, mecamylamine and alpha-bungarotoxin, reversed the inhibitory effects of nicotine, suggesting the involvement of alpha7-nAChR stimulation. Nicotine induced the expression of cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), and cAMP in the presence and absence of AGE-2 and AGE-3. PGE(2) is known to activate the EP(2)/EP(4) receptor, increasing the cAMP level and protein kinase A (PKA) activity. The actions of nicotine were reversed in part by an EP(2)-receptor antagonist, AH6809, an EP(4)-receptor antagonist, AH23848, and a PKA inhibitor, N-[2-(p-bromocinnamyl-amino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide dihydrochloride (H89). These results indicate that the mechanism of action of nicotine may be partially via endogenous PGE(2) production.
    Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics 12/2009; 332(3):1013-21. · 3.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Posttransplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a frequent complication among transplant recipients. Ligation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) with their receptor (RAGE) on monocytes/macrophages plays roles in the diabetes complications. The enhancement of adhesion molecule expression on monocytes/macrophages activates T-cells, leading to reduced allograft survival. We investigated the effect of four distinct AGE subtypes (AGE-2/AGE-3/AGE-4/AGE-5) on the expressions of intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, B7.1, B7.2 and CD40 on monocytes, the production of interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and the proliferation of T-cells during human mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). AGE-2 and AGE-3 selectively induced the adhesion molecule expression, cytokine production and T-cell proliferation. The AGE-induced up-regulation of adhesion molecule expression was involved in the cytokine production and T-cell proliferation. AGE-2 and AGE-3 up-regulated the expression of RAGE on monocytes; therefore, the AGEs may activate monocytes, leading to the up-regulation of adhesion molecule expression, cytokine production and T-cell proliferation.
    Clinical Immunology 11/2009; 134(3):345-53. · 3.77 Impact Factor
  • Masahiro Nishibori, Hideo Kohka Takahashi, Shuji Mori
    Folia Pharmacologica Japonica 11/2009; 134(5):271-5.
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    ABSTRACT: Cell-to-cell interaction through binding of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and CD40 on monocytes to their ligands on T-cells plays crucial roles in cytokine production. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) subtypes induce complications in diabetes. In a previous study, we found that glyceraldehyde-derived AGE (AGE-2) and glycolaldehyde-derived AGE (AGE-3) at 100 microg/ml induced the expressions of ICAM-1 and CD40 on monocytes and the production of interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. beta(2)-adrenoceptor stimulation has been demonstrated to modulate the production of inflammatory mediators. In the present study, we found that norepinephrine, epinephrine and isoproterenol inhibited AGE-2- and AGE-3-induced adhesion expression and cytokine production in a concentration-dependent manner. The action of these catecholamines was antagonized by beta(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist, but not by alpha(1)-, alpha(2)- and beta(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist. beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonists, salbutanol and terbutaline inhibited AGE-2- and AGE-3-induced adhesion expression and cytokine production, but alpha(1)-, alpha(2)- and beta(1)-adrenoceptor agonist had no effect, indicating that the stimulation of beta(2)-adrenoceptor might improve AGEs-initiated complications in diabetes.
    European journal of pharmacology 10/2009; 627(1-3):313-7. · 2.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Advanced glycation end product (AGE) subtypes, proteins or lipids that become glycated after exposure to sugars, induce complications in diabetes. Among the various AGE subtypes, glyceraldehyde-derived AGE (AGE-2) and glycolaldehyde-derived AGE (AGE-3) have been indicated to play roles in inflammation in diabetic patients. The engagement of AGEs and receptor for AGEs activates monocytes. Because the engagement of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), B7.1, B7.2, and CD40 on monocytes with their ligands on T cells plays roles in cytokine production, we investigated the effects of AGE-2 and AGE-3 on the expressions of ICAM-1, B7.1, B7.2, and CD40 on monocytes, the production of interferon gamma and tumor necrosis factor alpha, and the lymphocyte proliferation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and their modulation by prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). AGE-2 and AGE-3 induced the expressions of adhesion molecule, the cytokine production, and the lymphocyte proliferation. PGE(2) concentration-dependently inhibited the actions of AGE-2 and AGE-3. The effects of PGE(2) were mimicked by an E-prostanoid (EP)(2)-receptor agonist, 11,15-O-dimethyl prostaglandin E(2) (ONO-AE1-259-01), and an EP(4) receptor agonist, 16-(3-methoxymethyl)phenyl-omega-tetranor-3,7-dithia prostaglandin E(1) (ONO-AE1-329). An EP(2)-receptor antagonist, 6-isopropoxy-9-oxaxanthene-2-carboxylic acid (AH6809), and an EP(4)-receptor antagonist, (4Z)-7-[(rel-1S,2S,5R)-5-(1,1'-biphenyl-4-yl)methoxy)-2-(4-morpholinyl)-3-oxocyclopentyl]-4-heptenoic acid (AH23848), inhibited the actions of PGE(2). The stimulation of EP(2) and EP(4) receptors is reported to increase cAMP levels. The effects of PGE(2) were reversed by a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H89, and mimicked by a dibutyryl cAMP and an adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin. These results as a whole indicated that PGE(2) inhibited the actions of AGE-2 and AGE-3 via EP(2)/EP(4) receptors and the cAMP/PKA pathway.
    Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics 09/2009; 331(2):656-70. · 3.89 Impact Factor
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are modifications of proteins/lipids that become nonenzymatically glycated after contact with aldose sugars. Among various subtypes of AGEs, glyceraldehyde-derived AGE (AGE-2) and glycolaldehyde-derived AGE (AGE-3) are suggested to play roles in inflammation in diabetic patients. Because the engagement of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, B7.1, B7.2, and CD40 on monocytes with their ligands on T cells plays roles in cytokine production, we examined the effects of AGE-2 and AGE-3 on the expression of adhesion molecules and cytokine production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and their modulation by histamine in the present study. AGE-2 and AGE-3 induced the expressions of ICAM-1, B7.1, B7.2, and CD40 on monocytes and the production of interferon-gamma in PBMC. Histamine concentration-dependently inhibited the action of AGE-2 and AGE-3. The effects of histamine were antagonized by an H2 receptor antagonist, famotidine, and mimicked by H2/H4 receptor agonists dimaprit and 4-methylhistamine. Histamine induced cAMP production in the presence and absence of AGE-2 and AGE-3. The effects of histamine were reversed by a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, N-[2-(4-bromocinnamylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinoline (H89), and mimicked by a dibutyryl cAMP and an adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin. These results as a whole indicated that histamine inhibited the AGE-2- and AGE-3-induced adhesion molecule expression and cytokine production via H2 receptors and the cAMP/PKA pathway.
    Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics 07/2009; 330(3):826-33. · 3.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are proteins or lipids that become glycated after exposure to diverse reducing sugars. Accumulation of AGEs induces diabetes complications. Microinflammation is a common major mechanism in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications. Activation of monocytes/macrophages and T cells plays roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The activation of T cells requires the enhanced expression of adhesion molecules on monocytes. AGEs activate monocytes by engaging the receptor for AGE (RAGE); however, little is known about the profile of agonist activity of diverse AGE moieties on monocytes. We investigated the effect of four distinct AGE subtypes (AGE-modified bovine serum albumin; AGE-2, AGE-3, AGE-4, and AGE-5) at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 100 microg/ml on the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, B7.1, B7.2, and CD40 on monocytes and its impact on the production of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Among the AGEs examined, AGE-2 and AGE-3 selectively induced adhesion molecule expression and cytokine production. Antagonism experiments using antibodies against adhesion molecules demonstrated that cell-to-cell interaction between monocytes and T/natural killer cells was involved in AGE-2- and AGE-3-induced cytokine production. AGE-2 and AGE-3 up-regulated the expression of RAGE on monocytes. The effects of AGE-2 and AGE-3 were inhibited by nuclear factor-kappaB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors. These results indicated that AGE-2 and AGE-3 activated monocytes via RAGE, leading to the up-regulation of adhesion molecule expression and cytokine production.
    Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics 05/2009; 330(1):89-98. · 3.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: LPS stimulates CD14/Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4, leading to induce TNF-alpha production. Cell-to-cell interaction through the engagement between intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM) 1 on monocytes and its ligand on T cells has been suggested to play a role in the TNF-alpha production by LPS-treated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Adenosine is reported to inhibit LPS-induced TNF-alpha production. However, little is known about the mechanism of the inhibitory effects induced by adenosine on the LPS-induced immune responses. We found that adenosine inhibited the expression of ICAM-1 and the production of TNF-alpha by human PBMC via adenosine A2A receptor in the presence of LPS. However, the stimulation of A1R or A3R enhanced the actions of adenosine. Adenosine had no effect on the expression of CD14 and TLR-4, suggesting that the inhibitory effects of adenosine on the LPS actions might be independent of the expression of CD14 and TLR-4. Thus, adenosine differentially regulates the expression of ICAM-1 and the production of TNF-alpha through plural subtypes of receptors.
    Shock 03/2008; 29(2):154-9. · 2.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The cell-to-cell interaction through binding of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 on monocytes to their ligands lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 on T-cells plays important roles in cytokine production and T-cell proliferation. Interleukin (IL)-18, which plasma levels are elevated in patients during acute rejection following organ transplantation, induces the expression of ICAM-1 on monocytes, production of interferon (IFN)-gamma and IL-12 and lymphocyte proliferation during human mixed lymphocyte reaction. Activation of the adenosine A(2A) receptor on during reperfusion of various tissues has been found to markedly reduce ischemia-reperfusion injury. In the present study, we examined the effect of adenosine at increasing concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 100 microM on the IL-18-enhanced expression of ICAM-1, production of IFN-gamma and IL-12 and lymphocyte proliferation during human mixed lymphocyte reaction. Adenosine inhibited the IL-18-initiated immune responses. The IC(50) values of adenosine for inhibition of the IL-18-enhanced ICAM-1 expression, IFN-gamma production and lymphocyte proliferation were 20 microM, respectively. The actions of adenosine depended on the stimulation of adenosine A(2A) receptor. An inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA) at 100 microM inhibited the actions of adenosine, suggesting that PKA might be involved in the actions of adenosine. On the other hand, the stimulation of adenosine A(1) and A(3) receptor blocked the actions of adenosine A(2A) receptor stimulation. These results suggest that adenosine inhibits the immune responses during mixed lymphocyte reaction via adenosine A(2A) receptor.
    European Journal of Pharmacology 07/2007; 564(1-3):204-10. · 2.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The cell-to-cell interaction through binding intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and CD40 on monocytes and their ligands such as lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 and CD40 ligand (CD40L) on T-cells plays roles in cytokine production and T-cell proliferation. Interleukin (IL)-18, which is elevated in the plasma during acute rejection after organ transplantation, induces the expression of ICAM-1 and CD40 on monocytes, the production of interferon (IFN)-gamma and IL-12 and the proliferation of T-cells during the human mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). In addition to the cholesterol lowering effect, statins improve patient survival and decrease rejection episodes in transplant recipients. In the present study, we investigated the difference of effect of statins and calcineurin inhibitors during MLR. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, fluvastatin and pravastatin and statin-derived LFA-1 inhibitors, LFA703 and LFA878, which did not inhibit HMG-CoA reductase, suppressed the production of IFN-gamma and IL-12 and the lymphocyte proliferation as well as the expression of ICAM-1 and CD40 on monocytes regardless of the presence of IL-18. However, the calcineurin inhibitors, tacrolimus and cyclosporine A (CsA), inhibited the IL-18-enhanced cytokine production and lymphocyte proliferation without any effect on the adhesion molecule expression. Thus, the action mechanism of stain is different from that of calcineurin inhibitors.
    Clinical Immunology 07/2007; 123(3):324-32. · 3.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Adenosine inhibited interleukin (IL)-18 production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated monocytes. The action of adenosine was antagonized by an adenosine A2A-receptor (A2AR) antagonist and was mimicked by an A2AR agonist, suggesting that the stimulation of A2AR may be involved in the actions of adenosine. On the other hand, the stimulation of A1R and A3R inhibited the actions of A2AR stimulation, whereas the stimulation of A2BR had no effect on them. Activation of A2AR is known to increase cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels and to activate protein kinase A (PKA). A PKA inhibitor prevented the actions of A2AR stimulation, indicating that the action mechanism of A2AR stimulation may be via the activation of the cAMP/PKA pathway.
    Journal of Pharmacological Sciences 07/2007; 104(2):183-6. · 2.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nicotine is thought to inhibit the production of proinflammatory cytokines from macrophages through an anti-inflammatory pathway that is dependent on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha7 subunit (alpha7-nAChR). IL-18, an important proinflammatory cytokine, is reported to induce the expression of adhesion molecules on monocytes, thus enhancing cell-to-cell interactions with T-cells and contributing to IL-18-initiated cytokine production. Accordingly, inhibition of IL-18 suppresses systemic inflammatory responses. In the present study, we found that nicotine inhibited the IL-18-enhanced expression of ICAM-1, B7.2, and CD40 on monocytes, and the production of IL-12, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha by PBMC. A nonselective and a selective alpha7-nAChR antagonist, mecamylamine, and alpha-bungarotoxin abolished the effects of nicotine, suggesting that this depends on alpha7-nAChR stimulation. It is reported that nicotine induces prostaglandinE2 (PGE(2)) production in PBMC through the up-regulation of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression. PGE(2) is known to activate the EP2/EP4-receptor, leading to an increase in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels and protein kinase A (PKA) activity. Consistent with this, we found that COX-2 and PKA inhibitors prevented the effects of nicotine on adhesion molecule expression and cytokine production, indicating that the mechanism of action of nicotine may be via endogenous PGE(2) production.
    Journal of Leukocyte Biology 01/2007; 80(6):1388-94. · 4.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-receptor complex, CD14/toll-like receptor 4, is known to play a role in the immune responses during sepsis. Excessive inflammation and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha synthesis have been reported to cause morbidity and mortality in endotoxemia and sepsis. Cell-to-cell interaction through the engagement between intercellular adhesion molecule 1, B7.1, and CD40 on monocytes and their ligands on T cells has been suggested to play a role in the inflammatory response such as TNF-alpha and interleukin 10 production. Nicotine, with the stimulation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha7 subunit (alpha7-nAChR), has now become the focus of attention because of its anti-inflammatory effects. However, little is known about the mechanism of the inhibitory effects induced by nicotine on the LPS-induced immune responses. In the present study, we found that nicotine suppressed the expression of CD14, toll-like receptor 4, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, B7.1, and CD40 on monocytes and the production of TNF-alpha, but not interleukin 10, in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the presence of LPS. The actions of nicotine were reversed by a nonselective and a selective alpha7-nAChR antagonist, mecamylamine and alpha-bungarotoxin, respectively. Therefore, nicotine might inhibit the LPS receptor complex expression via alpha7-nAChR, thus leading to a decrease in the adhesion molecule expression and TNF-alpha production. Moreover, we demonstrated that a nuclear factor-kappaB and a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor mimicked the actions of nicotine in the presence of LPS. These results suggested that the nuclear factor-kappaB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase might be involved in the actions of nicotine.
    Shock 11/2006; 26(4):358-64. · 2.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nicotine inhibited interleukin (IL)-18 and -12 production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated monocytes, and the action of nicotine was antagonized by a non-selective and a selective alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (alpha7-nAChR) antagonist, suggesting that the stimulation of alpha7-nAChR may be involved in the action of nicotine. Nicotine is reported to induce prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production in monocytes through the up-regulation of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression. PGE(2) is known to increase cAMP levels and to activate protein kinase A (PKA). COX-2 and PKA inhibitors prevented the action of nicotine, indicating that the mechanism of action of nicotine may be via endogenous PGE(2) production.
    Journal of Pharmacological Sciences 10/2006; 102(1):143-6. · 2.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study demonstrates a possible mechanism for the improvement of gastrointestinal cancer patients' prognosis by the histamine receptor type 2 (H2R) antagonist cimetidine. This agent, but not the H2R antagonists ranitidine and famotidine, induced the production of an antitumor cytokine, interleukin (IL)-18, by human monocytes and dendritic cells (DC). In fact, ranitidine and famotidine antagonized cimetidine-induced IL-18 production. Cimetidine induced the activation of caspase-1, which is reported to modify immature IL-18 to mature/active IL-18, and the elevation of intracellular cAMP, leading to the activation of protein kinase A (PKA). The PKA inhibitor H89 abolished the IL-18 production induced by cimetidine. Moreover, the effects of cimetidine on IL-18 production were reproduced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from wild-type mice, but not in those from H2R knockout mice. In conclusion, cimetidine, a partial agonist for H2R, has a pharmacological profile different from ranitidine and famotidine, possibly contributing to its antitumor activity on gastrointestinal cancers.
    Molecular Pharmacology 09/2006; 70(2):450-3. · 4.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Statins, which inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A (HMG-CoA) reductase, are thought to reduce the risk of cancer through the inhibition of Ras farnesylation and serum lipid level. A pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-18 (IL-18), is reported to exhibit significant antitumor activities through the activation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells and the inhibition of angiogenesis. Previously, we found that pravastatin, fluvastatin, and simvastatin induced the production of IL-18 in human monocytes. The addition of mevalonate abolished the IL-18 production induced by pravastatin, fluvastatin, and simvastatin, indicating that the IL-18 production might be a result of the inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase. We present a new hypothesis that the production of IL-18 might play roles in the action of statins on cancer.
    Journal of Leukocyte Biology 09/2006; 80(2):215-6. · 4.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Interleukin (IL)-18, which is elevated in the plasma during acute rejection after organ transplantation, is known to induce the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, B7.1, B7.2, CD40 and CD40 ligand (CD40L) on monocytes, the production of interferon (IFN)-gamma and IL-12 and the proliferation of lymphocytes during the human mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). Ciprofloxacin (CIP), which is useful for the clinical treatment of infections due to its antibacterial properties after transplantation, was shown to suppress the IFN-gamma and IL-12 production, the lymphocyte proliferation and the ICAM-1, B7.1, B7.2 and CD40 expression on monocytes during MLR in the presence of IL-18. CIP also induced the production of prostaglandin (PG) E2. In order to determine whether the effects of CIP on the expression of the activation markers were due to CIP-dependent production of PGE2, we examined the effect of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors on the actions of CIP. Thereby, the inhibitors were found to abolish the actions of CIP. These results therefore suggest that CIP might exert its immune modulatory effects via the production of PGE2.
    Clinical Immunology 05/2006; 119(1):110-9. · 3.77 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

381 Citations
125.45 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012–2013
    • Kinki University
      Ōsaka, Ōsaka, Japan
  • 2003–2010
    • Okayama University
      • Department of Pharmacology
      Okayama, Okayama, Japan
  • 2006
    • Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States