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Publications (3)5.98 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Sjogren's syndrome can cause many organic changes, but is rarely accompanied by pleuritis. We report a 65-year-old patient with primary Sjogren's syndrome who developed bilateral pleuritis with moderately large effusions. He was diagnosed as having Sjogren's syndrome, based on xerophthalmia, xerostomia, positive results for anti-Sjogren's syndrome (anti-SS-A/SS-B) antibodies, the Schirmer test and biopsy findings in the minor salivary glands. The pleural fluid was lymphocyte rich and contained high levels of anti-SS-A/SS-B antibodies. There was no evidence of infection, malignancy or other collagen diseases which cause pleuritis. We conclude that this case adds to the eight previously published reports of primary Sjogren's syndrome complicated by pleural effusion.
    Respirology 02/2008; 13(1):155-8. · 2.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Oral metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma are very rare. We encountered a case of hepatocellular carcinoma with a solitary metastasis to the mandible as an initial manifestation. The patient was a 76-year-old man who was admitted for left mandibular swelling. A biopsy specimen of mandible was suspected to be a metastatic tumor. The histological findings, abdominal computed tomography, bone scintigraphy, and F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) revealed it to be a solitary metastasis from hepatocellular carcinoma. As a result, he was diagnosed to have liver cirrhosis due to a hepatitis C virus infection and hepatocellular carcinoma with a solitary metastasis to the mandible. The primary lesion was treated with transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE), and the metastasis to the mandible was surgically resected. The patient survived for 9 months after treatment without recurrence.
    Acta medica Okayama 09/2006; 60(4):243-7. · 0.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease is multifactorial and appears to combine both genetic and environmental factors. We experienced here a rare occurrence of woman monozygotic twins with ulcerative colitis (UC). A 45-year-old woman (the elder monozygotic twin) was admitted to our hospital because of bloody diarrhea occurring over 10 times per day, abdominal pain and fever. She was diagnosed as UC at the age of 22, and repeated the relapse and remission. She was diagnosed as relapse of UC and total colitis type. Her younger monozygotic twin sister also suffered from UC at the age of 22. Human leukocyte antigen was examined serologically with DNA type in both patients. DRB1*1502, which was previously shown to be dominant in Japanese patients with UC, was not observed in this case. Although the concordance in monozygotic twin in UC is reported to be 6.3-18.8%, the concordant case like this is relatively rare. We report this rare case of UC and the previously reported cases are also discussed.
    World Journal of Gastroenterology 01/2006; 11(47):7547-9. · 2.55 Impact Factor