Wolfgang E Berdel

University of Münster, Muenster, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany

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Publications (526)2885.77 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The antibody-based delivery of interleukin-2 (IL-2) to extracellular targets expressed in the easily accessible tumor-associated vasculature has shown potent anti-leukemic activity in xenograft and immunocompetent murine models of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), especially in combination with cytarabine. Here, we report our experiences in four patients with relapsed AML after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT), who were treated with the immunocytokine F16-IL2, in combination with low-dose cytarabine (LDAC). One patient with disseminated extramedullary AML lesions achieved a complete metabolic response in PET/CT, which lasted three months. Two out of three patients with bone marrow (BM) relapse achieved a blast reduction with transient molecular negativity. One of the two enjoyed a short complete remission before AML relapse occurred two months after the first infusion of F16-IL2. In line with a site-directed delivery of the cytokine, F16-IL2 led to an extensive infiltration of immune effector cells in the BM. Grade 2 fevers were the only non-hematological side effects in two patients. Grade 3 cytokine-release syndrome developed in the other two patients, but was manageable in both cases with glucocorticoids. The concept of specifically targeting IL-2 to the leukemia-associated stroma deserves further evaluation in clinical trials, especially in patients who relapse after allo-HSCT. Copyright © 2015, American Association for Cancer Research.
    Cancer immunology research. 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Epigenomic changes are an important feature of malignant tumors. How tumor aggressiveness is affected by DNA methylation of specific loci is largely unexplored. In genome wide DNA methylation analyses we identified the KCa 3.1 channel gene (KCNN4) promoter to be hypomethylated in an aggressive non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cell line and in patient samples. Accordingly, KCa 3.1 expression was increased in more aggressive NSCLC cells. Both findings were strong predictors for poor prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma. Increased KCa 3.1 expression was associated with aggressive features of NSCLC cells. Proliferation and migration of pro-metastatic NSCLC cells depended on KCa 3.1 activity. Mechanistically, elevated KCa 3.1 expression hyperpolarized the membrane potential thereby augmenting the driving force for Ca(2+) influx. KCa 3.1 blockade strongly reduced the growth of xenografted NSCLC cells in mice as measured by PET-CT. Thus, loss of DNA methylation of the KCNN4 promoter and increased KCa 3.1 channel expression and function are mechanistically linked to poor survival of NSCLC patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. Copyright © 2015 UICC.
    International Journal of Cancer 02/2015; · 6.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Non-relapse mortality after Allo-SCT has significantly decreased over the last years. Nevertheless, relapse remains a major cause for post SCT mortality in patients with AML and high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). In this retrospective single-center analysis, we have analyzed the treatment outcomes of 108 patients with AML or MDS, who relapsed after Allo-SCT. Seventy of these patients (65%) were treated with salvage therapies containing chemotherapy alone, allogeneic cell-based treatment or the combination of both. Thirty-eight patients (35%) received palliative treatment. Median OS after diagnosis of relapse was 130 days. Compared with patients who received chemotherapy alone, response to salvage therapy was significantly improved in patients treated with a combination of chemo- and allogeneic cell-based therapy (CR rate 57% vs 13%, P=0.002). Among risk factors concerning pretreatment characteristics, disease status before first Allo-SCT, and details of transplantation, only the time interval from Allo-SCT to relapse was an independent predictor of response to salvage therapy and OS. These data confirmed that time to relapse after transplantation is an important prognostic factor. Up to now, only patients eligible for treatment regimens containing allogeneic cell-based interventions achieved relevant response rates.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 19 January 2015; doi:10.1038/bmt.2014.300.
    Bone marrow transplantation. 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose:KRAS mutations are frequent driver mutations in multiple cancers. KRAS mutations also induce anti-EGFR antibody resistance in adenocarcinoma such as colon cancer. The aim of this study was to overcome anti-EGFR antibody resistance by coupling the antibody to KRAS-specific siRNA. Experimental Design:The anti-EGFR antibody was chemically coupled to siRNA. The resulting complex was tested for antibody binding efficiency, serum stability and ability to deliver siRNA to EGFR expressing cells. Western blotting, viability, apoptosis and colony formation assays were performed for efficacy evaluation in vitro. Furthermore, therapeutic activity of the antibody-KRAS-siRNA complexes was examined in in vivo xenograft mouse tumor models. Results:Antibody-siRNA complexes were targeted and internalized via the EGFR receptor. Upon internalization, target gene expression was strongly and specifically repressed, followed by a reduced proliferation and viability, and induced apoptosis of the cells in vitro. Clonogenic growth of mutant KRAS bearing cells was suppressed by KRAS-siRNA-anti-EGFR antibody complexes. In xenograft mouse models, anti-EGFR antibody-KRAS-siRNA complexes significantly slowed tumor growth in anti-EGFR resistant cells. Conclusions:The coupling of siRNA against KRAS to anti-EGFR antibodies provides a novel therapy approach for KRAS-mutated EGFR-positive cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. These findings provide an innovative approach for cancer specific siRNA application and for enhanced therapeutic potential of monoclonal antibody therapy and personalized treatment of cancer entities. Copyright © 2015, American Association for Cancer Research.
    Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Multiplex PCR (mPCR) directly from blood has been suggested as a promising method for rapid identification of pathogens causing sepsis. This study aimed to investigate whether mPCR has any impact on antimicrobial treatment. Hematological patients with febrile neutropenia were randomized into two groups. In the study group, mPCR was performed as an addition to standard diagnostics, and PCR finding was immediately communicated to the clinicians, thus being available for decision making. In the control group, clinicians were not aware of PCR result. PCR samples were collected simultaneously with clinically indicated blood culture specimens from peripheral vein and/or central venous catheter at fever onset and once again if fever persisted up to 72 h. Overall, 74 patients of the study group and 76 patients of the control group were enrolled and 253 samples collected. Therapy was changed to targeted antimicrobial therapy (AMT) in 12 patients (16.2 %) in the study group and in 12 patients (15.8 %) in the control group. For patients with changes, the median time to change to the targeted AMT was 21.4 h in the study group and 47.5 h in the control group (p = 0.018). In the study group, 57.1 % (8/14) of changes to targeted AMT was due to PCR finding. PCR led to AMT change in 9.5 % (7/74) of study group patients, i.e., in 33.3 % (7/21) of patients who had positive PCR finding. There were no significant differences in patient outcomes (secondary endpoints). In conclusion, PCR method accelerates change to the targeted AMT in febrile neutropenic patients.
    Medical microbiology and immunology. 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: The presence of a mutated nucleophosmin-1 gene (NPM1mut) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with a favorable prognosis. To assess the predictive value with regard to allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (SCT), we compared the clinical course of patients with NPM1mut AML eligible for allogeneic SCT in a donor versus no-donor analysis. Of 1,179 patients with AML (age 18 to 60 years) treated in the Study Alliance Leukemia AML 2003 trial, we identified all NPM1mut patients with an intermediate-risk karyotype. According to the trial protocol, patients were intended to receive an allogeneic SCT if an HLA-identical sibling donor was available. Patients with no available donor received consolidation or autologous SCT. We compared relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) depending on the availability of a suitable donor. Of 304 eligible patients, 77 patients had a sibling donor and 227 had no available matched family donor. The 3-year RFS rates in the donor and no-donor groups were 71% and 47%, respectively (P = .005); OS rates were 70% and 60%, respectively (P = .114). In patients with normal karyotype and no FLT3 internal tandem duplication (n = 148), the 3-year RFS rates in the donor and no-donor groups were 83% and 53%, respectively (P = .004); and the 3-year OS rates were 81% and 75%, respectively (P = .300). Allogeneic SCT led to a significantly prolonged RFS in patients with NPM1mut AML. The absence of a statistically significant difference in OS is most likely a result of the fact that NPM1mut patients who experienced relapse responded well to salvage treatment. Allogeneic SCT in first remission has potent antileukemic efficacy and is a valuable treatment option in patients with NPM1mut AML with a sibling donor. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 12/2014; 33(5). · 17.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Functional differences between healthy progenitor and cancer initiating cells may provide unique opportunities for targeted therapy approaches. Hematopoietic stem cells are tightly controlled by a network of CDK inhibitors that govern proliferation and prevent stem cell exhaustion. Loss of Inca1 led to an increased number of short-term hematopoietic stem cells in older mice, but Inca1 seems largely dispensable for normal hematopoiesis. On the other hand, Inca1-deficiency enhanced cell cycling upon cytotoxic stress and accelerated bone marrow exhaustion. Moreover, AML1-ETO9a-induced proliferation was not sustained in Inca1-deficient cells in vivo. As a consequence, leukemia induction and leukemia maintenance were severely impaired in Inca1-/- bone marrow cells. The re-initiation of leukemia was also significantly inhibited in absence of Inca1-/- in MLL-AF9- and c-myc/BCL2-positive leukemia mouse models. These findings indicate distinct functional properties of Inca1 in normal hematopoietic cells compared to leukemia initiating cells. Such functional differences might be used to design specific therapy approaches in leukemia.
    PLoS ONE 12/2014; 9(12):e115578. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitory drugs such as 5-azacytidine induce DNA hypomethylation by inhibiting DNA methyltransferases. While clinically effective, DNMT inhibitors are not curative. A combination with cytotoxic drugs might be beneficial, but this is largely unexplored. In the present study, we analyzed potential synergisms between cytotoxic drugs and 5-azacytidine in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Lung cancer and leukemia cell lines were exposed to low doses of 5-azacytidine with varying doses of cytarabine or etoposide for AML cells (U937 and HL60) as well as cisplatin or gemcitabine for NSCLC cells (A549 and HTB56) for 48 h. Drug interaction and potential synergism was analyzed according to the Chou-Talalay algorithm. Further analyses were based on soft agar colony formation assays, active caspase-3 staining and BrdU incorporation flow cytometry. To identify effects on DNA methylation patterns, we performed genome wide DNA methylation analysis using 450K bead arrays. Azacytidine at low doses was synergistic with cytotoxic drugs in NSCLC and in AML cell lines. Simultaneous exposure to 5-azacytidine with cytotoxic drugs showed strong synergistic activity. In colony formation assays these synergisms were repeatedly verified for 5-azacytidine (25 nM) with low doses of anticancer agents. 5-azacytidine neither affected the cell cycle nor increased apoptosis. 450K methylation bead arrays revealed 1,046 CpG sites in AML and 1,778 CpG sites in NSCLC cells with significant DNA hypomethylation (24-h exposure) to 5-azacytidine combined with the cytotoxic drugs. These CpG-sites were observed in the candidate tumor-suppressor genes MGMT and THRB. Additional incubation time after 24-h treatment led to a 4.1-fold increase of significant hypomethylated CpG-sites in NSCLC cells. These results suggest that the addition of DNA demethylating agents to cytotoxic anticancer drugs exhibits synergistic activity in AML and NSCLC. Dysregulation of an equilibrium of DNA methylation in cancer cells might increase the susceptibility for cytotoxic drugs.
    International journal of oncology. 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The optimal timing of allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation (HCT) in AML is controversial. We report on 1179 patients with a median age of 48 years who were randomized upfront. In the control arm, sibling HCT was scheduled in the first complete remission for intermediate-risk or high-risk AML and matched unrelated HCT in complex karyotype AML. In the experimental arm, matched unrelated HCT in the first remission was offered also to patients with an FLT3-ITD allelic ratio >0.8, poor day +15 marrow blast clearance, and adverse karyotypes. Further, allogeneic HCT was recommended in high-risk AML to be performed in aplasia after induction chemotherapy.Leukemia accepted article preview online, 01 December 2014. doi:10.1038/leu.2014.335.
    Leukemia 12/2014; · 9.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is a primary benign disease, which is characterized by papillomatous growth in the respiratory tract. Malignant transformation occurs in only 3-5% of cases, however, local growth of the benign papillomas is interpreted as clinically malignant in a markedly higher proportion of patients. Local surgical or endoscopic interventional debulking or excision is currently the commonly selected treatment method and antiviral therapy is a potential adjuvant approach. However, the long-term management of RRP patients, who commonly require multiple procedures over numerous years, is challenging and the overall therapeutic armamentarium remains unsatisfactory. The administration of systemic bevacizumab treatment in a series of five patients with long histories of RRP, who required repeated local interventions to control papilloma growth is evaluated. Treatment with the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody bevacizumab was administered at a dose of 5 mg/kg (n=1), 10 mg/kg (n=3) or 15 mg/kg (n=1) intravenously to the five RRP patients, who were clinically classified as exhibiting progressive disease. Endoscopic evaluations were performed prior to the first infusion of bevacizumab and intermittently at variable time points during the course of therapy. Histopathological analyses were performed using pre- and post-treatment papilloma biopsies, including immunohistochemical analyses of VEGF and phosphorylated VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-2 expression. The patients received between three and 16 courses of bevacizumab (median, six courses). The first course was initiated when progression following the previous intervention was observed. An immediate response to bevacizumab treatment was demonstrated in all five RRP patients. While the cumulative number of interventions in the five patients was 18 throughout the 12 months prior to the initiation of bevacizumab treatment, only one patient required interventional treatment due to a malignant transformation during the 12 months following treatment with bevacizumab (18 vs. 1 interventions, P=0.042). Histopathological analyses revealed regressive perivascular edema and normalization of the vascular structure, however, immunohistochemical analyses of the VEGF and phosphorylated VEGFR-2 expression did not demonstrate any changes following therapy. Due to the limited number of alternative treatments, VEGF-targeted therapies may represent a promising novel strategy in the treatment of RRP, which may have the potential to modify the current treatment standards, particularly in patients with poorly accessible papilloma lesions, however, this requires further investigation in clinical trials.
    Oncology letters 11/2014; 8(5):1912-1918. · 0.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background The aim of this study was to analyze the long-term survival of AML patients with CEBPA mutations.Patients and methodsWe investigated 88 AML patients with a median age of 61 years and (1) cytogenetically normal AML (CN-AML), (2) monoallelic (moCEBPA) or biallelic (biCEBPA) CEBPA mutation, and (3) intensive induction treatment. 60/88 patients have been described previously with a shorter follow-up.ResultsMedian follow-up time was 9.8 years (95% CI: 9.4-10.1 years) compared to 3.2 and 5.2 years in our former analyses. Patients with biCEBPA survived significantly longer compared to those with moCEBPA (median overall survival (OS) 9.6 years vs. 1.7 years, p¿=¿0.008). Patients¿¿¿60 years and biCEBPA mutations showed a favorable prognosis with a 10-year OS rate of 81%.Both, bi- and moCEBPA-mutated groups had a low early death (d60) rate of 7% and 9%, respectively. Complete remission (CR) rates for biCEBPA- and moCEBPA-mutated patients were 82% vs. 70% (p¿=¿0.17). biCEBPA-mutated patients showed a longer relapse free survival (RFS) (median RFS 9.4 years vs. 1.5 years, p¿=¿0.021) and a lower cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) compared to moCEBPA-mutated patients. These differences in OS and RFS were confirmed after adjustment for known clinical and molecular prognostic factors.Conclusions In this long-term observation we confirmed the favorable prognostic outcome of patients with biCEBPA mutations compared to moCEBPA-mutated CN-AML. The high probability of OS (81%) in younger patients is helpful to guide intensity of postremission therapy.
    Journal of Hematology & Oncology 09/2014; 7(1):55. · 4.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Apoptosis is a crucial pathway in tumor growth and metastatic development. Apoptotic proteins regulate the underlying molecular cascades and are thought to modulate the tumor response to chemotherapy and radiation. However, the prognostic value of the expression of apoptosis regulators in localized non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is still unclear.
    Journal of thoracic oncology: official publication of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer 07/2014; · 4.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Isolated trisomy 13 (AML+13) is a rare chromosomal abnormality in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and its prognostic relevance is poorly characterized. We analyzed the clinical course of 34 AML+13 patients enrolled in the German AMLCG-1999 and SAL trials and studied their biological characteristics by exome sequencing, targeted sequencing of candidate genes and gene expression profiling. Relapse-free (RFS) and overall survival (OS) of AML+13 patients were inferior compared to other ELN Intermediate-II patients (n=855) (median RFS, 7.8 vs 14.1 months, p=0.006; median OS 9.3 vs. 14.8 months, p=0.004). Besides the known high frequency of RUNX1 mutations (75%), we identified mutations in spliceosome components in 88%, including SRSF2 codon 95 mutations in 81%, of AML+13 patients. Moreover, recurring mutations were detected in ASXL1 (44%) and BCOR (25%). Two patients carried mutations in CEBPZ, suggesting that CEBPZ is a novel recurrently mutated gene in AML. Gene expression analysis revealed a homogenous expression profile including upregulation of FOXO1 and FLT3 and downregulation of SPRY2. This is the most comprehensive clinical and biological characterization of AML+13 to date, and reveals a striking clustering of lesions in a few genes, defining AML+13 as a genetically homogenous leukemia subgroup with alterations in a few critical cellular pathways. These studies were registered at clinicaltrials.gov, identifiers: AMLCG-1999: NCT00266136; AML96: NCT00180115; AML2003: NCT00180102; and AML60+: NCT00893373.
    Blood 06/2014; · 9.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), assessment of minimal residual disease (MRD) by flow cytometry (flow MRD) after induction and consolidation therapy has been shown to provide independent prognostic information. However, data on the value of earlier flow MRD assessment is lacking. Therefore, the value of flow MRD detection was determined during aplasia in 178 patients achieving complete remission after treatment according to AMLCG induction protocols. Flow MRD-positivity during aplasia predicted poor outcome (5-year relapse-free survival (RFS) 16% vs 43%, P<0.001) independently from age and cytogenetic risk group (hazard ratio for MRD-positivity 1.71; P=0.009). Importantly, the prognosis of patients without detectable MRD was not impacted by morphological blast count during aplasia nor by MRD status post-induction. Early flow MRD was also evaluated in the context of existing risk factors. Flow MRD was prognostic within the intermediate cytogenetic risk group (5-year RFS 15% vs. 37%, p=0.016) as well as for patients with normal karyotype and NPM1 mutations (5-year RFS 13% vs. 49%, P=0.02) or FLT3-ITD (3-year RFS rates 9% vs. 44%, P=0.016). Early flow MRD assessment can improve current risk stratification approaches by prediction of RFS in AML and might facilitate adaptation of post-remission therapy for patients at high risk of relapse.Leukemia accepted article preview online, 10 June 2014; doi:10.1038/leu.2014.186.
    Leukemia 06/2014; 29(2). · 9.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Monitoring of minimal residual disease represents an important diagnostic tool to identify patients with acute myeloid leukemia at high risk for relapse. In this study the prognostic potential of minimal residual disease monitoring by quantitative real-time PCR of NPM1 mutations of patients treated in the AMLCG trials 1999, 2004 and 2008 was investigated. Minimal residual disease monitoring was performed in 588 samples of 158 NPM1 mutation A, B and D positive patients at diagnosis, in aplasia, after induction therapy, after consolidation therapy, and during follow-up with a sensitivity of 10-6. 127 patients (80.4%) achieved complete remission after induction therapy and of these 56 patients (44.1%) relapsed. At each checkpoints, minimal residual disease cut-offs were calculated. After induction therapy a cut-off NPM1 mutation ratio of 0.01 revealed a high hazard ratio of 4.26 and the highest sensitivity of 76% for the prediction of relapse. This was reflected in a cumulative incidence of relapse after 2 years of 77.8% for cut-off positive patients versus 26.4% for cut-off negative patients, respectively. In the favorable subgroup according to European LeukemiaNet, the cut-off after induction therapy also separates the cohort into two prognostic groups with a cumulative incidence of relapse of 76% versus 6% after 2 years. Our data demonstrate that in addition to pre-therapeutic factors, the individual minimal residual disease course is an important prognostic factor and could be included into clinical trials for the guidance of postremission therapy. Trials were registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (#NCT01382147, #NCT00266136) and at the European Leukemia Trial Registry (#LN_AMLINT2004_230).
    Haematologica 05/2014; · 5.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: External signals that are mediated by specific receptors determine stem cell fate. The thrombin receptor PAR1 plays an important role in haemostasis, thrombosis and vascular biology, but also in tumor biology and angiogenesis. Its expression and function in hematopoietic stem cells is largely unknown. Here, we analyzed expression and function of PAR1 in primary hematopoietic cells and their leukemic counterparts. AML patients' blast cells expressed much lower levels of PAR1 mRNA and protein than CD34+ progenitor cells. Constitutive Par1-deficiency in adult mice did not affect engraftment or stem cell potential of hematopoietic cells. To model an AML with Par1-deficiency, we retrovirally introduced the oncogene MLL-AF9 in wild type and Par1-/- hematopoietic progenitor cells. Par1-deficiency did not alter initial leukemia development. However, the loss of Par1 enhanced leukemic stem cell function in vitro and in vivo. Re-expression of PAR1 in Par1-/- leukemic stem cells delayed leukemogenesis in vivo. These data indicate that Par1 contributes to leukemic stem cell maintenance.
    PLoS ONE 04/2014; 9(4):e94993. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cytogenetically normal (CN) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the largest and most heterogeneous cytogenetic AML subgroup. For the practicing clinician, it is difficult to summarize the prognostic information of the growing number of clinical and molecular markers. Our purpose was to develop a widely applicable prognostic model by combining well-established pretreatment patient and disease characteristics. Two prognostic indices for CN-AML (PINA), one regarding overall survival (OS; PINAOS) and the other regarding relapse-free survival (RFS; PINARFS), were derived from data of 572 patients with CN-AML treated within the AML Cooperative Group 99 study (www.aml-score.org. On the basis of age (median, 60 years; range, 17 to 85 years), performance status, WBC count, and mutation status of NPM1, CEBPA, and FLT3-internal tandem duplication, patients were classified into the following three risk groups according to PINAOS and PINARFS: 29% of all patients and 32% of 381 responding patients had low-risk disease (5-year OS, 74%; 5-year RFS, 55%); 56% of all patients and 39% of responding patients had intermediate-risk disease (5-year OS, 28%; 5-year RFS, 27%), and 15% of all patients and 29% of responding patients had high-risk disease (5-year OS, 3%; 5-year RFS, 5%), respectively. PINAOS and PINARFS stratified outcome within European LeukemiaNet genetic groups. Both indices were confirmed on independent data from Cancer and Leukemia Group B/Alliance trials. We have developed and validated, to our knowledge, the first prognostic indices specifically designed for adult patients of all ages with CN-AML that combine well-established molecular and clinical variables and that are easily applicable in routine clinical care. The integration of both clinical and molecular markers could provide a basis for individualized patient care through risk-adapted therapy of CN-AML.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 04/2014; · 17.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: ScopeIn previous studies, we could show that the B vitamin nicotinamide (NAM) enhanced antimicrobial activity of neutrophils. Here, we assessed the effects of NAM in two models of experimental colitis.Methods and ResultsColitis was induced in C57BL/6 mice either by oral infection with Citrobacter rodentium or by DSS (dextran sodium sulphate) administration, and animals were systemically treated with NAM. Ex vivo bacterial clearance was assessed in murine and human whole blood, as well as isolated human neutrophils. In C. rodentium-induced colitis, NAM treatment resulted in markedly decreased systemic bacterial invasion, histological damage and increased fecal clearance of C. rodentium by up to 600-fold. In contrast, NAM had no effect when administered to neutrophil-depleted mice. Ex vivo stimulation of isolated human neutrophils, as well as murine and human whole blood with NAM led to increased clearance of C. rodentium and enhanced expression of antimicrobial peptides in neutrophils. Moreover, NAM treatment significantly ameliorated the course of DSS colitis, as assessed by body weight, histological damage and myeloperoxidase activity.Conclusion Pharmacological application of NAM mediates beneficial effects in bacterial and chemically induced colitis. Future studies are needed to explore the clinical potential of NAM in the context of intestinal bacterial infections and human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
    Molecular Nutrition & Food Research 04/2014; · 4.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: About 30% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) harbour mutations of the receptor tyrosine kinase FLT3, mostly internal tandem duplications (ITD) and point mutations of the second tyrosine kinase domain (TKD). It was the aim of this study to comprehensively analyze clinical and functional properties of various FLT3 mutants. In 672 normal karyotype AML patients FLT3-ITD, but not FLT3-TKD mutations were associated with a worse relapse free and overall survival in multivariate analysis. In paired diagnosis-relapse samples FLT3-ITD showed higher stability (70%) compared to FLT3-TKD (30%). In vitro, FLT3-ITD induced a strong activating phenotype in Ba/F3 cells. In contrast, FLT3-TKD mutations and other point mutations - including two novel mutations - showed a weaker but clear gain-of-function phenotype with gradual increase in proliferation and protection from apoptosis. The pro-proliferative capacity of the investigated FLT3 mutants was associated with cell surface expression and tyrosine 591 phosphorylation of the FLT3 receptor. Western blot experiments revealed STAT5 activation only in FLT3-ITD positive cell lines, in contrast to FLT3-non-ITD mutants, which displayed an enhanced signal of AKT and MAPK activation. Gene expression analysis revealed distinct difference between FLT3-ITD and FLT3-TKD for STAT5 target gene expression as well as deregulation of SOCS2, ENPP2, PRUNE2 and ART3. FLT3-ITD and FLT3 point mutations show a gain-of-function phenotype with distinct signalling properties in vitro. Although poor prognosis in AML is only associated with FLT3-ITD, all activating FLT3 mutations can contribute to leukemogenesis and are thus potential targets for therapeutic interventions.
    PLoS ONE 03/2014; 9(3):e89560. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a heterogenous disease. Prognosis of AML is influenced both by patient-specific as well as disease-specific factors. Age is the most prominent patient-specific risk factor, while chromosomal aberrations are the strongest disease-specific risk factors. For patients with cytogenetically normal AML, prognosis can be specified by mutational status of the genes NPM1, FLT3 and CEBPA. A growing number of recurrent mutations in additional genes have recently been identified, for which the prognostic effect yet has to be determined. Performance status, geriatric assessment, secondary leukaemia following myelodysplastic syndrome or cytotoxic treatment, common laboratory parameters, leukaemic stem cell frequency, bone marrow microenvironment, gene expression levels, epigenetic changes, micro-RNA's as well as kinetics and depth of response to treatment influence prognosis of AML patients. Despite the high number of established risk factors, only few predictive markers exist which can truly aid therapy decisions in patients with AML.
    British Journal of Haematology 02/2014; · 4.94 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

12k Citations
2,885.77 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1999–2015
    • University of Münster
      • Department of Medicine, Hematology and Oncology
      Muenster, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 2001–2014
    • Universitätsklinikum Münster
      • • Medizinische Klinik B
      • • Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik A
      • • Institut für Humangenetik
      Muenster, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
    • Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
      • Division of Hematology and Oncology
      Los Angeles, CA, United States
  • 2012
    • Universität Mannheim
      Mannheim, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
  • 2003–2012
    • Ludwig-Maximilian-University of Munich
      • Department of Internal Medicine II
      München, Bavaria, Germany
  • 2011
    • University Hospital Frankfurt
      Frankfurt, Hesse, Germany
  • 2003–2009
    • University of Hamburg
      • Center for Oncology
      Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany
  • 2008
    • Universität des Saarlandes
      Saarbrücken, Saarland, Germany
  • 2007
    • Universität Heidelberg
      Heidelburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
  • 2006
    • Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin
      • Department of Pediatrics, Division of Oncology and Hematology
      Berlín, Berlin, Germany
  • 2005
    • Jiangsu University
      • Institute of Life Sciences
      Zhenjiang, Jiangsu Sheng, China
    • Bundeswehrzentralkrankenhaus Koblenz
      Coblenz, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
  • 2004
    • University Medical Center Hamburg - Eppendorf
      Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany
  • 2002
    • Roswell Park Cancer Institute
      • Department of Neurosurgery
      Buffalo, New York, United States
  • 2000
    • California Institute of Technology
      • Division of Biology
      Pasadena, California, United States
  • 1998
    • Max-Delbrück-Centrum für Molekulare Medizin
      Berlín, Berlin, Germany
  • 1991–1998
    • Freie Universität Berlin
      • Department of Hematology
      Berlín, Berlin, Germany
  • 1988–1994
    • Emory University
      • • Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology
      • • School of Medicine
      Atlanta, GA, United States
  • 1993
    • University Hospital München
      München, Bavaria, Germany
  • 1981–1993
    • Technische Universität München
      • Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik I
      München, Bavaria, Germany
  • 1981–1990
    • Deutsches Herzzentrum München
      München, Bavaria, Germany
  • 1986
    • Umeå University
      Umeå, Västerbotten, Sweden