Daniel Bernstein

Stanford Medicine, Stanford, California, United States

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Publications (149)652.89 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The role of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) in adult hearts is unknown; also unclear is how lncRNA modulates nucleosome remodelling. An estimated 70% of mouse genes undergo antisense transcription, including myosin heavy chain 7 (Myh7), which encodes molecular motor proteins for heart contraction. Here we identify a cluster of lncRNA transcripts from Myh7 loci and demonstrate a new lncRNA-chromatin mechanism for heart failure. In mice, these transcripts, which we named myosin heavy-chain-associated RNA transcripts (Myheart, or Mhrt), are cardiac-specific and abundant in adult hearts. Pathological stress activates the Brg1-Hdac-Parp chromatin repressor complex to inhibit Mhrt transcription in the heart. Such stress-induced Mhrt repression is essential for cardiomyopathy to develop: restoring Mhrt to the pre-stress level protects the heart from hypertrophy and failure. Mhrt antagonizes the function of Brg1, a chromatin-remodelling factor that is activated by stress to trigger aberrant gene expression and cardiac myopathy. Mhrt prevents Brg1 from recognizing its genomic DNA targets, thus inhibiting chromatin targeting and gene regulation by Brg1. It does so by binding to the helicase domain of Brg1, a domain that is crucial for tethering Brg1 to chromatinized DNA targets. Brg1 helicase has dual nucleic-acid-binding specificities: it is capable of binding lncRNA (Mhrt) and chromatinized-but not naked-DNA. This dual-binding feature of helicase enables a competitive inhibition mechanism by which Mhrt sequesters Brg1 from its genomic DNA targets to prevent chromatin remodelling. A Mhrt-Brg1 feedback circuit is thus crucial for heart function. Human MHRT also originates from MYH7 loci and is repressed in various types of myopathic hearts, suggesting a conserved lncRNA mechanism in human cardiomyopathy. Our studies identify a cardioprotective lncRNA, define a new targeting mechanism for ATP-dependent chromatin-remodelling factors, and establish a new paradigm for lncRNA-chromatin interaction.
    Nature 08/2014; · 38.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Due to the limited self-renewal capacity of cardiomyocytes, the mammalian heart exhibits impaired regeneration and insufficient ability to restore heart function after injury. Cardiovascular tissue engineering is currently considered as a promising alternative therapy to restore the structure and function of the failing heart. Recent evidences suggest that the epicardium may play critical roles in regulation of myocardial development and regeneration. One of the mechanisms has been proposed for the restorative effect of the epicardium is the specific physiomechanical cues that this layer provides to the cardiac cells. In this article we explore whether a new generation of epicardium-mimicking, acellular matrices can be utilized to enhance cardiac healing after injury. The matrix consists of a dense collagen scaffold, with optimized biomechanical properties approaching those of embryonic epicardium. Grafting the epicardial patch onto the ischemic myocardium, promptly post the incidence of infarct, resulted in preserved contractility, attenuated ventricular remodeling, diminished fibrosis, and vascularization within the injured tissue in the adult murine heart.
    Bioengineered. 01/2014; 5(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Earlier studies have indicated that the pharmacokinetics of mycophenolic acid (MPA) is influenced by polymorphisms of ABCC2, which encodes for the membrane transporter MRP2. The ABCC2 rs717620 A allele has been associated with enterohepatic recirculation of MPA, and our previous work had correlated the discontinuance of MPA with this allele in pediatric heart transplant patients. Therefore, we hypothesized that the ABCC2 rs717620 A allele would be associated with poorer outcomes including rejection with hemodynamic compromise (RHC), graft failure, and death in the pediatric heart transplant (PHTx) population receiving MPA. PHTx recipients from 6 institutions in the Pediatric Heart Transplantation Study (PHTS) from the period of 1993-2009, receiving MPA therapy, were genotyped for ABCC2 rs717620. Genotyping was accomplished by direct sequencing. Demographic and outcome data were limited to the data routinely collected as part of the PHTS and included RHC and mortality. Two hundred ninety patients were identified who received MPA at some point post transplantation, of which 200 carried the GG genotype, 81 carried the AG genotype, and 9 carried the AA genotype. Follow-up time after transplantation was 6 years. RHC occurred in 76 patients and 18 patients died. In the 281 patients followed up more than 1 year, late RHC (>1 year post transplantation) occurred in 42 patients. While both RHC and late RHC were associated with the ABCC2 rs717620 GG genotype (hazard ratios: 1.80 and 4.57, respectively, p<0.05) in all patients, this association was not significant in PHTx patients receiving only MPA as the antiproliferative agent from the time of transplant (n=142). ABCC2 rs717620 polymorphisms varied within racial groups. As a candidate gene assessment, the ABCC2 rs717620 AG and AA genotypes may be associated with improved, rather than poorer, RHC in PHTx patients receiving MPA therapy. ABCC2 rs717620 polymorphisms should be included in any expanded pharmacogenomic analysis of outcomes after pediatric heart transplantation.
    The journal of pediatric pharmacology and therapeutics : JPPT : the official journal of PPAG. 01/2014; 19(1):16-24.
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    ABSTRACT: HC is a rare cause of congestive heart failure that typically presents with malignant ventricular arrhythmias in infants, often requiring urgent intervention. Successful heart transplantation in a patient with HC has only been reported once (J Heart Lung Transplant 2004: 23: 902). The combination of HC with concurrent LVNC has only been described three times (Int J Legal Med 2009: 123: 47; Hum Pathol 2005: 36: 403; Pediatr Dev Pathol 2012: 15: 397). We report two rare cases of HC with LVNC in two infants presenting with cardiogenic shock, one requiring ECMO support who was successfully bridged to orthotopic heart transplantation with a Berlin Heart LVAD.
    Pediatric Transplantation 11/2013; 17(7):E165-E167. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Regeneration of the damaged myocardium is one of the most challenging fronts in the field of tissue engineering due to the limited capacity of adult heart tissue to heal and to the mechanical and structural constraints of the cardiac tissue. In this study we demonstrate that an engineered acellular scaffold comprising type I collagen, endowed with specific physiomechanical properties, improves cardiac function when used as a cardiac patch following myocardial infarction. Patches were grafted onto the infarcted myocardium in adult murine hearts immediately after ligation of left anterior descending artery and the physiological outcomes were monitored by echocardiography, and by hemodynamic and histological analyses four weeks post infarction. In comparison to infarcted hearts with no treatment, hearts bearing patches preserved contractility and significantly protected the cardiac tissue from injury at the anatomical and functional levels. This improvement was accompanied by attenuated left ventricular remodeling, diminished fibrosis, and formation of a network of interconnected blood vessels within the infarct. Histological and immunostaining confirmed integration of the patch with native cardiac cells including fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, epicardial cells, and immature cardiomyocytes. In summary, an acellular biomaterial with specific biomechanical properties promotes the endogenous capacity of the infarcted myocardium to attenuate remodeling and improve heart function following myocardial infarction.
    Biomaterials 08/2013; · 8.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Aims Beta adrenergic receptor (β-AR) subtypes act through diverse signaling cascades to modulate cardiac function and remodeling. Previous in vitro studies suggest that β1-AR signaling is cardiotoxic whereas β2-AR signaling is cardioprotective, and may be the case during ischemia/reperfusion in vivo. The objective of this study was to assess whether β2-ARs also played a cardioprotective role in the pathogenesis of non-ischemic forms of cardiomyopathy. Methods and Results To dissect the role of β1 vs β2-ARs in modulating MLP (Muscle LIM Protein) cardiomyopathy, we crossbred MLP-/- with β1-/- or β2-/- mice. Deletion of the β2-AR improved survival, cardiac function, exercise capacity and myocyte shortening; in contrast haploinsufficency of the β1-AR reduced survival. Pathologic changes in Ca(2+) handling were reversed in the absence of β2-ARs: peak Ca(2+) and SR Ca(2+) were decreased in MLP-/- and β1+/-/MLP-/- but restored in β2-/-MLP-/-. These changes were associated with reversal of alterations in troponin I and phospholamban phosphorylation. Gi inhibition increased peak and baseline Ca(2+), recapitulating changes observed in the β2-/-/MLP-/-. The L-type Ca(2+)blocker verapamil significantly decreased cardiac function in β2-/-MLP-/- vs WT. We next tested if the protective effects of β2-AR ablation were unique to the MLP model using TAC-induced heart failure. Similar to MLP, β2-/- mice demonstrated delayed progression of heart failure with restoration of myocyte shortening and peak Ca(2+) and Ca(2+) release. Deletion of β2-ARs prevents the development of MLP-/- cardiomyopathy via positive modulation of Ca(2+) due to removal of inhibitory Gi signaling and increased phosphorylation of troponin I and phospholamban. Similar effects were seen after TAC. Unlike previous models where β2-ARs were found to be cardioprotective, in these two models, β2-AR signaling appears to be deleterious, potentially through negative regulation of Ca(2+) dynamics.
    Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology 08/2013; · 5.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Dysfunctional bone morphogenetic protein receptor-2 (BMPR2) signaling is implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We used a transcriptional high-throughput luciferase reporter assay to screen 3,756 FDA-approved drugs and bioactive compounds for induction of BMPR2 signaling. The best response was achieved with FK506 (tacrolimus), via a dual mechanism of action as a calcineurin inhibitor that also binds FK-binding protein-12 (FKBP12), a repressor of BMP signaling. FK506 released FKBP12 from type I receptors activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1), ALK2, and ALK3 and activated downstream SMAD1/5 and MAPK signaling and ID1 gene regulation in a manner superior to the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine and the FKBP12 ligand rapamycin. In pulmonary artery endothelial cells (ECs) from patients with idiopathic PAH, low-dose FK506 reversed dysfunctional BMPR2 signaling. In mice with conditional Bmpr2 deletion in ECs, low-dose FK506 prevented exaggerated chronic hypoxic PAH associated with induction of EC targets of BMP signaling, such as apelin. Low-dose FK506 also reversed severe PAH in rats with medial hypertrophy following monocrotaline and in rats with neointima formation following VEGF receptor blockade and chronic hypoxia. Our studies indicate that low-dose FK506 could be useful in the treatment of PAH.
    The Journal of clinical investigation 07/2013; · 15.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The relationship between SES and outcomes surrounding pediatric cardiac transplantation is complex and influenced by recipient race. Broad-based studies of SES have not been performed. A retrospective review of all 5125 primary pediatric heart transplants performed in the United States between 2000 and 2011. Patients were stratified by SES based on zip code of residence and U.S. census data (low SES: 1637; mid-SES: 2253; high SES: 1235). Survival following listing and transplantation was compared across strata. Risk-adjusted long-term mortality on the waitlist was higher among low SES patients (hazard 1.32, CI 1.07-1.63). The relationship between SES and outcomes varied by race. Early risk-adjusted post-transplant outcomes were worst among high SES patients (10.8% vs. low SES: 8.9%, p < 0.05). The incidence of non-compliance was higher among low SES patients (p < 0.0001). Long-term risk-adjusted patient survival was poorer among low (hazard 1.41, CI 1.10-1.80) and mid-SES (1.29, 1.04-1.59) groups. Low SES is associated with worse outcomes on both the waitlist and late following transplantation. Higher SES patients had more complex transplants with higher early mortality. Further research should be directed at identifying and addressing underlying causal factors for these disparities.
    Pediatric Transplantation 07/2013; · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Alterations in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) have been described in left ventricular hypertrophy and failure, although results have been inconsistent. The role of the UPS in right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) and failure (RVF) is unknown. Given the greater percent increase in RV mass associated with RV afterload stress, as present in many congenital heart lesions, we hypothesized that alterations in the UPS could play an important role in RVH/RVF. Methods and Results: UPS expression and activity were measured in the RV from mice with RVH/RVF secondary to pulmonary artery constriction (PAC). Epoxomicin and MG132 were used to inhibit the proteasome, and overexpression of the 11S PA28α subunit was used to activate the proteasome. PAC mice developed RVH (109.3% increase in RV weight to body weight, RVW/BW), RV dilation with septal shift, RV dysfunction and clinical RVF. Proteasomal function (26S β5 chymotrypsin-like activity) was decreased 26% (p<0.05). Protein expression of 19S subunit Rpt5 (p<0.05), UCHL1 deubiquitinase (p<0.0001), and Smurf1 E3 ubiquitin ligase (p<0.01) were increased, as were polyubiquitinated proteins (p<0.05) and free-ubiquitins (p=0.05). Pro-apoptotic Bax was increased (p<0.0001), while anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 decreased (p<0.05) resulting in a 6-fold increase in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Proteasomal inhibition did not accelerate RVF. However, proteasome enhancement by cardiac-specific proteasome overexpression partially improved survival. Conclusions: Proteasome activity is decreased in RVH/RVF, associated with upregulation of key UPS regulators and pro-apoptotic signaling. Enhancement of proteasome function partially attenuates RVF suggesting that UPS dysfunction contributes to RVF.
    AJP Heart and Circulatory Physiology 05/2013; · 3.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pulmonary insufficiency (PI) is a common long-term sequel after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, causing progressive right ventricular (RV) dilation and failure. We describe the physiologic and molecular characteristics of the first murine model of RV volume overload. Methods: PI was created by entrapping the pulmonary valve leaflets with sutures. Imaging, catheterization and exercise testing were performed at 1, 3 and 6 months and compared to sham controls. RNA from the RV free wall was hybridized to Agilent whole-genome oligonucleotide microarrays. Results: Volume overload resulted in RV enlargement, decreased RV outflow tract shortening fraction at 1 month followed by normalization at 3 and 6 months (39±2, 44±2 and 41±2 vs. 46±3% in sham), early reversal of E/A ratio followed by pseudonormalization (0.87±0.08, 0.82±0.08 and 0.96±0.08 vs. 1.04±0.03, p<0.05), elevated end diastolic pressure (7.6±0.7, 6.9±0.8 and 7±0.5 vs. 2.7±0.2mmHg, p<0.05) and decreased exercise duration (26±0.4, 26±1 and 22±1.3 vs. 30±1.1 min, p<0.05). Subendocardial RV fibrosis was evident by 1 month. At 1 month, 372 genes were significantly downregulated. Mitochondrial pathways and G-protein coupled receptor signaling were the most represented categories. At 3 months, 434 genes were upregulated and 307 downregulated. While many of the same pathways continued to be downregulated, TNF-α, TGF-β1, p53-signaling, and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling transitioned from down- to upregulated. Conclusions: We describe a novel murine model of chronic RV volume overload recapitulating aspects of the clinical disease with gene expression changes suggesting early mitochondrial bioenergetic dysfunction, enhanced TGF-β signaling, ECM remodeling and apoptosis.
    AJP Heart and Circulatory Physiology 03/2013; · 3.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: For patients with end-stage hepatic failure secondary to failing hemodynamics, combined heart-liver transplant (H-LT) remains the only option for long-term survival. We report a series of three pediatric patients who successfully underwent orthotopic H-LT for failed single-ventricle palliation. All three patients are currently living, now two, three, and five years post-transplant, and remain completely free of cardiac cellular allograft rejection despite reduced immunosuppression protocols. One patient, however, did develop acute antibody-mediated rejection in the immediate post-transplant period, suggesting that this protective effect may be less effective in attenuating humoral mechanisms of rejection.
    The Journal of heart and lung transplantation: the official publication of the International Society for Heart Transplantation 03/2013; 32(3):368-70. · 3.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that isolated gastrointestinal complaints (abdominal pain, nausea, anorexia, weight loss), in the absence of other symptoms, were a common mode of initial presentation in children with congestive heart failure (CHF). STUDY DESIGN: Ninety-eight patients younger than 18 years hospitalized with dilated cardiomyopathy at a single institution between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2009, were included. Retrospective review of their presenting complaints was recorded and analyzed according to 3 age groups: 0 to 1 year (infants), 1 to 10 years (children), and 11 to 18 years (adolescents) of age. RESULTS: Respiratory symptoms were common in all age groups (range, 56%-63%). Gastrointestinal complaints were also common in all age groups (42%, 28%, and 65%, respectively) and were more frequent than respiratory complaints in adolescents. Adolescents were likely to present with abdominal pain as their only complaint (10/43, 23%). Chest pain, syncope, or cardiac arrest occurred rarely. CONCLUSIONS: Abdominal complaints are a common component of the presenting symptom complex of CHF in pediatric dilated cardiomyopathy in all age groups. In adolescents, abdominal complaints occur more frequently than respiratory complaints and often in the absence of any other symptoms. Unlike CHF in adults, chest pain, arrhythmia, or cardiac arrest occurs rarely at presentation in pediatric patients. Recognition of the different presenting symptoms of heart failure in children by primary providers is crucial to ensuring prompt diagnosis and timely initiation of therapy.
    The American journal of emergency medicine 02/2013; · 1.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Immature primary and stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes provide useful models for fundamental studies of heart development and cardiac disease, and offer potential for patient specific drug testing and differentiation protocols aimed at cardiac grafts. To assess their potential for augmenting heart function, and to gain insight into cardiac growth and disease, tissue engineers must quantify the contractile forces of these single cells. Currently, axial contractile forces of isolated adult heart cells can only be measured by two-point methods such as carbon fiber techniques, which cannot be applied to neonatal and stem cell-derived heart cells because they are more difficult to handle and lack a persistent shape. Here we present a novel axial technique for measuring the contractile forces of isolated immature cardiomyocytes. We overcome cell manipulation and patterning challenges by using a thermoresponsive sacrificial support layer in conjunction with arrays of widely separated elastomeric microposts. Our approach has the potential to be high-throughput, is functionally analogous to current gold-standard axial force assays for adult heart cells, and prescribes elongated cell shapes without protein patterning. Finally, we calibrate these force posts with piezoresistive cantilevers to dramatically reduce measurement error typical for soft polymer-based force assays. We report quantitative measurements of peak contractile forces up to 146 nN with post stiffness standard error (26 nN) far better than that based on geometry and stiffness estimates alone. The addition of sacrificial layers to future 2D and 3D cell culture platforms will enable improved cell placement and the complex suspension of cells across 3D constructs.
    Biomedical Microdevices 09/2012; 15(1). · 2.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Rationale: Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized by progressive elevation in pulmonary pressure and loss of small pulmonary arteries. As bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) promote pulmonary angiogenesis by recruiting the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, we proposed that βcatenin activation could reduce loss and/or induce regeneration of small PAs and attenuate PH. Objective: This study aims to establish the role of β-catenin in protecting the pulmonary endothelium and stimulating compensatory angiogenesis following injury. Methods and Results: To assess the impact of β-catenin activation on chronic hypoxia-induced PH, we used the adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc(Min/+)) mouse, where reduced APC causes constitutive β-catenin elevation. Surprisingly, hypoxic Apc(Min/+) mice displayed greater PH and small PA loss compared to control C57Bl6J (C57) littermates. Pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) isolated from Apc(Min/+) demonstrated reduced survival and angiogenic responses along with a profound reduction in adhesion to laminin. The mechanism involved failure of APC to interact with the cytoplasmic domain of the α3 integrin, to stabilize focal adhesions and activate integrin-linked kinase (ILK-1) and pAkt. We found that PAECs from lungs of patients with idiopathic PH have reduced APC expression, decreased adhesion to laminin and impaired vascular tube formation. These defects were corrected in the cultured cells by transfection of APC. Conclusions: We show that APC is integral to PAEC adhesion and survival and is reduced in PAECs from PH patient lungs. The data suggest that decreased APC may be a cause of increased risk or severity of PH in genetically susceptible individuals.
    Circulation Research 09/2012; · 11.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Common genetic variations influence rejection, infection, drug metabolism, and side effect profiles after pediatric heart transplantation. Reports in adults suggest that genetic background may influence post-transplant renal function. In this multicenter study, we investigated the association of genetic polymorphisms (GPs) in a panel of candidate genes on renal function in 453 pediatric heart transplant recipients. We performed genotyping for functional GPs in 19 candidate genes. Renal function was determined annually after transplantation by calculation of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Mixed-effects and Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess recipient characteristics and the effect of GPs on longitudinal eGFR and time to eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73m(2). Mean age at transplantation was 6.2 ± 6.1 years. Mean follow-up was 5.1 ± 2.5 years. Older age at transplant and black race were independently associated with post-transplant renal dysfunction. Univariate analyses showed FASL (C-843T) T allele (p = 0.014) and HO-1 (A326G) G allele (p = 0.0017) were associated with decreased renal function. After adjusting for age and race, these associations were attenuated (FASL, p = 0.075; HO-1, p = 0.053). We found no associations of other GPs with post-transplant renal function, including GPs in TGFβ1, CYP3A5, ABCB1, and ACE. In this multicenter, large, sample of pediatric heart transplant recipients, we found no strong associations between GPs in 19 candidate genes and post-transplant renal function. Our findings contradict reported associations of CYP3A5 and TGFβ1 with renal function and suggest that genotyping for these GPs will not facilitate individualized immunosuppression for the purpose of protecting renal function after pediatric heart transplantation.
    The Journal of heart and lung transplantation: the official publication of the International Society for Heart Transplantation 07/2012; 31(9):1003-8. · 3.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We hypothesized that children with dilated cardiomyopathy who require hospital admission are at increased risk for death or transplantation during their first hospitalization and in the first year that follows. We also assessed the value of routine data collected during that time to predict death or the need for transplantation prior to discharge and within 1 year of admission. We conducted a retrospective review of 83 pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy whose initial hospitalization fell between 2004 and 2009. The mean age at hospitalization was 7 years. The majority of patients demonstrated moderate or severe left ventricular dysfunction on initial echocardiogram (80%) and/or the need for intravenous inotropes within 7 days of hospital admission (69%). Five patients (6%) died, and 15 (18%) were transplanted in the initial hospitalization. At 1 year, 11/71 (15%) had died, and 27/71 (38%) were transplanted. The overall freedom from death, transplantation, or rehospitalization at 1 year following admission was 21%. Fractional shortening, left ventricular ejection fraction, serum cholesterol, uric acid, mixed venous saturation, and atrial filling pressures were all predictive of death or transplantation during the initial hospitalization. Left ventricular ejection fraction was predictive of death or transplantation at 1 year. The first hospitalization for dilated cardiomyopathy marks a period of high risk for clinical decline, end stage heart failure, and the need for cardiac transplantation. Echocardiographic function and hemodynamic and serum measurements may aid in predicting outcomes. Despite medical management, most patients will be rehospitalized and/or require cardiac transplantation within 1 year of admission.
    Circulation Heart Failure 05/2012; 5(4):437-43. · 6.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: MicroRNAs (miRs) are small, noncoding RNAs that are emerging as crucial regulators of cardiac remodeling in left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and failure (LVF). However, there are no data on their role in right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) and failure (RVF). This is a critical question given that the RV is uniquely at risk in patients with congenital right-sided obstructive lesions and in those with systemic RVs. We have developed a murine model of RVH and RVF using pulmonary artery constriction (PAC). miR microarray analysis of RV from PAC vs. control demonstrates altered miR expression with gene targets associated with cardiomyocyte survival and growth during hypertrophy (miR 199a-3p) and reactivation of the fetal gene program during heart failure (miR-208b). The transition from hypertrophy to heart failure is characterized by apoptosis and fibrosis (miRs-34, 21, 1). Most are similar to LVH/LVF. However, there are several key differences between RV and LV: four miRs (34a, 28, 148a, and 93) were upregulated in RVH/RVF that are downregulated or unchanged in LVH/LVF. Furthermore, there is a corresponding downregulation of their putative target genes involving cell survival, proliferation, metabolism, extracellular matrix turnover, and impaired proteosomal function. The current study demonstrates, for the first time, alterations in miRs during the process of RV remodeling and the gene regulatory pathways leading to RVH and RVF. Many of these alterations are similar to those in the afterload-stressed LV. miRs differentially regulated between the RV and LV may contribute to the RVs increased susceptibility to heart failure.
    Physiological Genomics 03/2012; 44(10):562-75. · 2.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Clinical trials of bone marrow-derived stem cell therapy for the heart have yielded variable results. The basic mechanism(s) that underlies their potential efficacy remains unknown. In the present study, we evaluated the survival kinetics, transcriptional response, and functional outcome of intramyocardial bone marrow mononuclear cell (BMMC) transplantation for cardiac repair in a murine myocardial infarction model. We used bioluminescence imaging and high-throughput transcriptional profiling to evaluate the in vivo survival kinetics and gene expression changes of transplanted BMMCs after their engraftment into ischemic myocardium. Our results demonstrate short-lived survival of cells following transplant, with less than 1% of cells surviving by 6 weeks posttransplantation. Moreover, transcriptomic analysis of BMMCs revealed nonspecific upregulation of various cell regulatory genes, with a marked downregulation of cell differentiation and maturation pathways. BMMC therapy caused limited improvement of heart function as assessed by echocardiography, invasive hemodynamics, and positron emission tomography. Histological evaluation of cell fate further confirmed findings of the in vivo cell tracking and transcriptomic analysis. Collectively, these data suggest that BMMC therapy, in its present iteration, may be less efficacious than once thought. Additional refinement of existing cell delivery protocols should be considered to induce better therapeutic efficacy.
    Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 01/2012; 32(1):92-102. · 6.34 Impact Factor
  • Pediatric Transplantation 09/2011; 16(2):205-6. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We previously found that in the hearts of hypertensive Dahl salt-sensitive rats, βIIPKC levels increase during the transition from compensated cardiac hypertrophy to cardiac dysfunction. Here we showed that a six-week treatment of these hypertensive rats with a βIIPKC-specific inhibitor, βIIV5-3, prolonged their survival by at least 6weeks, suppressed myocardial fibrosis and inflammation, and delayed the transition from compensated hypertrophy to cardiac dysfunction. In addition, changes in the levels of the Ca(2+)-handling proteins, SERCA2 and the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, as well as troponin I phosphorylation, seen in the control-treated hypertensive rats were not observed in the βΙΙPKC-treated rats, suggesting that βΙΙPKC contributes to the regulation of calcium levels in the myocardium. In contrast, treatment with the selective inhibitor of βIPKC, an alternative spliced form of βIIPKC, had no beneficial effects in these rats. We also found that βIIV5-3, but not βIV5-3, improved calcium handling in isolated rat cardiomyocytes and enhanced contractility in isolated rat hearts. In conclusion, our data using an in vivo model of cardiac dysfunction (late-phase hypertrophy), suggest that βIIPKC contributes to the pathology associated with heart failure and thus an inhibitor of βIIPKC may be a potential treatment for this disease.
    Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology 09/2011; 51(6):980-7. · 5.15 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

3k Citations
652.89 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2000–2014
    • Stanford Medicine
      • • Department of Pediatrics
      • • Stanford Cardiovascular Institute
      • • Division of Pediatric Cardiology
      Stanford, California, United States
  • 2010–2013
    • Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford
      Palo Alto, California, United States
  • 2007–2011
    • University of Pittsburgh
      • • Department of Pathology
      • • Division of Pediatric Cardiology
      Pittsburgh, PA, United States
  • 1990–2011
    • Stanford University
      • • Department of Pediatrics
      • • Division of Cardiovascular Medicine
      • • Division of Pediatric Cardiology
      • • Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery
      • • Division of Vascular Surgery
      Stanford, CA, United States