H G Beger

Universität Ulm, Ulm, Baden-Württemberg, Germany

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Publications (878)2186.23 Total impact

  • Beger HG, Poch B, Vasilescu C
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    ABSTRACT: Background The recent evolution of limited local operative procedures for benign pancreatic lesions shifted surgical treatment options to the application of local techniques, although major resections of pancreatic head and left resection are still the standard. Objectives To evaluate the level of evidence of tumour enucleation (EN), pancreatic middle segment resection (PMSR) and duodenum preserving total/subtotal pancreatic head resection (DPPHRt/s), we focus based on present knowledge on indication to surgical treatment evaluating the questions, when and how to operate. Results Tumour enucleation is recommended for all symptomatic neuro-endocrine tumours with size up to 2 -3 cm and non-adherence to pancreatic main-ducts. EN has been applied predominantly in neuro-endocrine tumours and less frequently in cystic neoplasms. 20 % of enucleation are performed as minimal invasive laparascopic procedure. Surgery related severe post-operative complications with the need of re-intervention are observed in about 11 %, pancreatic fistula in 33 %. The major advantage of EN are low procedure related early post-operative morbidity and a very low hospital mortality. PMSR is applied in two thirds for symptomatic cystic neoplasm and in one third for neuro-endocrine tumours. The high level of 33 % pancreatic fistula and severe post-operative complications of 18 % is related to management of proximal pancreatic stump. DPPHRt/s is used in 70 % for symptomatic cystic neoplasms, for lesions with risk for malignancy and in less than 10 % for neuro-endocrine tumours. DPPHRt with segment resection of peripapillary duodenum and intra-pancreatic common bile duct has been applied in one third of patients and in two thirds by complete preservation of duodenum and common bile duct. The level of evidence for EN and PMSR is low because of retrospective data evaluation and absence of RCT results. For DPPHR, 7 prospective, controlled studies underline the advantages compared to partial pancreaticoduodenectomy. Conclusion The application of tumour enucleation, pancreatic middle segment resection and duodenum preserving subtotal or total pancreatic head resection are associated with low level surgery related early post-operative complications and a very low hospital mortality. The major advantage of the limited procedures is preservation of exo- and endocrine pancreatic functions.
    International Journal of Surgery. 01/2014;
  • H G Beger, M Siech, B Poch
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    ABSTRACT: Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are being detected and surgically treated increasingly more frequently. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) and mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCN) are primary benign lesions; however, the 5-year risk for malignant transformation has been estimated to be 63 % and 15 %, respectively. Surgical extirpation of a benign cystic tumor of the pancreas is a cancer preventive measure. The duodenum-preserving total pancreatic head resection technique (DPPHRt) is being used more frequently for cystic neoplasms of the pancreatic head. The complete resection of the pancreatic head can be applied as a duodenum-preserving technique or with segmental resection of the peripapillary duodenum. Borderline lesions, carcinoma in situ or T1N0 cancer of the papilla and the peripapillary common bile duct are also considered to be indications for segmental resection of the peripapillary duodenum. A literature search for cystic neoplastic lesions and DPPHRt revealed the most frequent indications to be IPMN, MCN and SCA lesions and 28 % suffered from a cystic neoplasm with carcinoma in situ or a peripapillary malignoma. The hospital mortality rate was 0.52 %. Compared to the Whipple type resection the DPPHRt exhibits significant benefits with respect to a low risk for early postoperative complications and a low hospital mortality rate of < 1 %. Exocrine and endocrine pancreatic functions after DPPHR are not impaired compared to the Whipple type resection.
    Der Chirurg 02/2013; · 0.52 Impact Factor
  • Hans G Beger, Michael Schwarz, Bertram Poch
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are diagnosed frequently due to early use of abdominal imaging techniques. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, mucinous cystic neoplasm, and serous pseudopapillary neoplasia are considered pre-cancerous lesions because of frequent transformation to cancer. Complete surgical resection of the benign lesion is a pancreatic cancer preventive treatment. OBJECTIVES: The application for a limited surgical resection for the benign lesions is increasingly used to reduce the surgical trauma with a short- and long-term benefit compared to major surgical procedures. Duodenum-preserving total pancreatic head resection introduced for inflammatory tumors in the pancreatic head transfers to the patient with a benign cystic lesion located in the pancreatic head, the advantages of a minimalized surgical treatment. PATIENTS: Based on the experience of 17 patients treated for cystic neoplastic lesions with duodenum-preserving total pancreatic head resection, the surgical technique of total pancreatic head resection for adenoma, borderline tumors, and carcinoma in situ of cystic neoplasm is presented. A segmental resection of the peripapillary duodenum is recommended in case of suspected tissue ischemia of the peripapillary duodenum. In 305 patients, collected from the literature by PubMed search, in about 40% of the patients a segmental resection of the duodenum and 60% a duodenum and common bile duct-preserving total pancreatic head resection has been performed. RESULTS: Hospital mortality of the 17 patients was 0%. In 305 patients collected, the hospital mortality was 0.65%, 13.2% experienced a delay of gastric emptying and a pancreatic fistula in 18.2%. Recurrence of the disease was 1.5%. Thirty-two of 175 patients had carcinoma in situ. CONCLUSION: Duodenum-preserving total pancreatic head resection for benign cystic neoplastic lesions is a safe surgical procedure with low post-operative morbidity and mortality.
    Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery 07/2012; · 2.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Laparoskopische Pankreasoperationen sind in Deutschland wenig verbreitet und werden nur in ca. 20Kliniken, allerdings zunehmend praktiziert. Minimal-invasive Eingriffe an der Bauchspeicheldrüse setzen einen hohen laparoskopischen Erfahrungsschatz in Kombination mit spezieller Erfahrung in der Pankreaschirurgie voraus. Bei der Einführung gänzlich neuer Techniken in die Chirurgie, sei es konventionell oder minimal-invasiv, sind drei Prinzipien obligat: Patientensicherheit, langfristig gleiche oder bessere Ergebnisse und vertretbare Kostenaspekte. Zur Evaluation dieser Endpunkte wurde 2008 ein Register für laparoskopische Pankreaschirurgie mit Unterstützung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Allgemeine und Viszeralchirurgie begonnen. Eine erste Konsensuskonferenz wurde im Mai 2011 im Klinikum Aalen mit Beiträgen aus 12 Kliniken, in denen bereits Erfahrung in der Anwendung laparoskopischer Pankreasoperationen vorliegt, veranstaltet. Anhand der bisher berichteten Erfahrung mit minimal-invasiven Eingriffen an der Bauchspeicheldrüse und den ausgiebigen Diskussionen wurde die Indikation zur laparokopischen Operation diskutiert und in „geeignet“, „nicht geeignet“ oder „geeignet in besonderen Fällen“ klassifiziert. Die Konsensuskonferenz führte zu dem Ergebnis einer Definition von Indikationen für laparoskopische Eingriffe an der Bauchspeicheldrüse. Die beteiligten Kliniken haben verabredet, alle Patientendaten laparoskopischer Pankreasoperationen in ein gemeinsames Register einzubringen und gemeinsam auszuwerten. Laparoscopic pancreatic surgery is not common practice in Germany and is only carried out in approximately 20 clinics but with an increasing trend. The reasons for this are manifold, such as the current selection of patients and both skills in laparoscopic and pancreatic surgery are necessary to perform this operation safely. In 2008 a registry called „Laparoscopic pancreatic surgery“ was implemented to collect enough data in Germany to find out whether the resection is safe, feasible and beneficial for the patient. For further development of new laparoscopic techniques new data is needed. A group of experts performing laparoscopic pancreatic surgery in Germany supplied their data for the German registry for laparoscopic pancreatic resection and a consensus conference about the indications became necessary. This consensus conference discussed in particular the indications for laparoscopic pancreatic resection. A consensus was found by all members of the conference utilizing currently available evidence-based data. It was suggested that all data of laparoscopic pancreatic surgery should be evaluated in the German Registry. A consensus was made which diseases were either suitable for laparoscopic resection or not suitable or suitable in selected cases. SchlüsselwörterLaparoskopie–Pankreaschirurgie–Tumoren–Nekrosektomie–Abszess KeywordsLaparoscopy–Pancreatic surgery–Tumors–Necrosectomy–Abscess
    Der Chirurg 01/2012; 83(3):247-253. · 0.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Laparoscopic pancreatic surgery is not common practice in Germany and is only carried out in approximately 20 clinics but with an increasing trend. The reasons for this are manifold, such as the current selection of patients and both skills in laparoscopic and pancreatic surgery are necessary to perform this operation safely. In 2008 a registry called "Laparoscopic pancreatic surgery" was implemented to collect enough data in Germany to find out whether the resection is safe, feasible and beneficial for the patient.For further development of new laparoscopic techniques new data is needed. A group of experts performing laparoscopic pancreatic surgery in Germany supplied their data for the German registry for laparoscopic pancreatic resection and a consensus conference about the indications became necessary. This consensus conference discussed in particular the indications for laparoscopic pancreatic resection. A consensus was found by all members of the conference utilizing currently available evidence-based data.It was suggested that all data of laparoscopic pancreatic surgery should be evaluated in the German Registry. A consensus was made which diseases were either suitable for laparoscopic resection or not suitable or suitable in selected cases.
    Der Chirurg 09/2011; 83(3):247-53. · 0.52 Impact Factor
  • H G Beger, F Gansauge
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: After the routine use of ether narcosis and surgical antisepsis, the evolution of surgery experienced fascinating and genuinely surgical technique-related advancements. Surgeons from Germany contributed strongly to the upturn of operative treatment in the second half of the nineteenth century. DISCUSSION: B. von Langenbeck inaugurated in 1852 an osteosynthese device in a patient with pseudoarthrosis. He is credited to be the very first in introducing the principle of fixateur externe. Th. Billroth performed in 1873 the first extirpation of the larynx in a patient with a malignant tumor. Postoperatively, the patient was cared with an artificial larynx. The first successful resection of the distal stomach inaugurated by Th. Billroth in 1881 was later called the Billroth II procedure. Rydygier from Kulm and Billroth from Wien are the first who successfully performed resection of the lower part of the stomach with anastomosis to the duodenum (Billroth I type of resection). In 1883, Th. Kocher from Bern reported 101 cases of thyroidectomy, the largest single-surgeon experience. L. Rehn from Frankfurt did in 1887 the first successful suturing of a beating heart to repair a large stab wound. A. Braun, Königsberg presented in 1892 his techniques of side-to-side anastomosis of the intestine to avoid a circular intestinal anastomosis. F. Sauerbruch from Breslau published in 1904 his thoracotomy chamber with space for two surgeons opening routine access to intrathoracic tissues protecting pulmonary ventilation during surgery. W. Kausch from Berlin reported in 1912 about three successful pancreatic head resections for peripapillary cancer. The first successful pancreatic head resection was performed in 1909 in a patient with a cancer of the papilla. The patient survived for a long term.
    Langenbeck s Archives of Surgery 03/2010; 395 Suppl 1:17-21. · 1.89 Impact Factor
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    Hans G Beger
    Langenbeck s Archives of Surgery 03/2010; 395(4):293-4. · 1.89 Impact Factor
  • H G Beger
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: In February 1860, B. Langenbeck, Th. Billroth, and G. Gurlt certified in Berlin with the publisher A. Hirschwald the founding of Archiv für Klinische Chirurgie. The journal published extended reports about application of new and case-proven surgical procedures. Separate sections were dedicated to surgical casuistics and small surgical communications and report of surgical institutions from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland as well as annual statistical reports of hospitals. Beginning with the first issue, the Archive was an international journal with the focus on gastrointestinal, trauma, orthopedic, thyroid, and vascular surgery. A section Achievements and Progress in Surgery referred to published results in national and international medical and surgical journals. GERMAN SOCIETY OF SURGERY: Surgeons from Germany contributed strongly to the rise of operative treatment concepts in the second half of the nineteenth century by new surgical procedures, many of them published in the Archiv für Klinische Chirurgie. Since 1923, the German Society of Surgery took Archiv für Klinische Chirurgie as the official journal of the society. Beginning 1950, Langenbeck's published in a separate supplement the proceedings of the annual congress of the German Society of Surgery. A second supplement published since 1972 focused exclusively on reporting of research work presented in the section of Surgical Forum for Experimental and Clinical Surgery. AFTER THE WAR: After World War II, Langenbeck's Archiv für Chirurgie gained acceptance as the leading scientific surgical journal in Germany. Since 1998, the concept of Langenbeck's Archiv was completely changed to an English journal with the title Langenbeck's Archives of Surgery. In the last 12 years, Langenbeck's has turned to an international German-surgery-based electronic journal. Langenbeck's Archives of Surgery experienced an increasing international reputation; in 2001, only two non-American journals (British Journal of Surgery and Langenbeck's) belonged to the top ten journals in general and GI-tract surgery. The present impact factor (IF) of Langenbeck's Archives of Surgery is 1.829 (5-year IF). The decrease of subscriptions for the journal is compensated by an increase of electronic readers. The electronic supplementary material provided by the Springer Company is used to publish manuscripts in the section How-To-Do Surgery, combined with a video clip about surgical techniques. The focus of Langenbeck's is general, GI-tract, endocrine, and HBP surgery. CONCLUSION: Langenbeck's has continuously been published for 150 years and is considered to be the worldwide oldest scientific surgical journal. The English-language-based journal contributes increasingly to an international communication of surgical research and clinical surgeons from Germany.
    Langenbeck s Archives of Surgery 03/2010; 395 Suppl 1:3-12. · 1.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mechanisms leading to acute pancreatitis after a fat-enriched meal combined with excess alcohol are incompletely understood. We have studied the effects of alcohol and fat (VLDL) on pancreatic acinar cell (PAC) function, oxidative stress, and repair mechanisms by pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) leading to fibrogenesis. To do so, PAC (rat) were isolated and cultured up to 24 h. Ethanol and/or VLDL were added to PAC. We measured PAC function (amylase, lipase), injury (lactic dehydrogenase), apoptosis (TUNEL, Apo2.7, annexin V binding), oxidative stress, and lipid peroxidation (conjugated dienes, malondialdehyde, chemoluminescence); we also measured PSC proliferation (bromodeoxyuridine incorporation), matrix synthesis (immunofluorescence of collagens and fibronectin, fibronectin immunoassay), and fatty acids in PAC supernatants (gas chromatography). Within 6 h, cultured PAC degraded and hydrolyzed VLDL completely. VLDL alone (50 microg/ml) and in combination with alcohol (0.2, 0.5, and 1% vol/vol) induced PAC injury (LDL, amylase, and lipase release) within 2 h through generation of oxidative stress. Depending on the dose of VLDL and alcohol, apoptosis and/or necrosis were induced. Antioxidants (Trolox, Probucol) reduced the cytotoxic effect of alcohol and VLDL. Supernatants of alcohol/VLDL-treated PAC stimulated stellate cell proliferation and extracellular matrix synthesis. We concluded that, in the presence of lipoproteins, alcohol induces acinar cell injury. Our results provide a biochemical pathway for the clinical observation that a fat-enriched meal combined with excess alcohol consumption can induce acinar cell injury (acute pancreatitis) followed by repair mechanisms (proliferation and increased matrix synthesis in PSC).
    AJP Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology 09/2009; 297(6):G1163-71. · 3.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is life-threatening and reports on surgical procedures and results are rare, but essential. Longitudinal surveillance and long-term follow-up of patients surgically treated for AE during the periods 1982-1999 (group A) and 2000-2006 (group B). University hospital within an endemic area. The median (min-max) follow-up period was 141 (5-417) months. Forty-eight surgical procedures were performed in 36 patients with AE: 63% were partial resections of the liver (additional extrahepatic resection in ten of them), 17% just extrahepatic resections, 10% biliodigestive anastomosis, and 10% exploratory laparotomies. Seventy-five percent of the operations were first-time procedures, 25% done due to a relapse. Forty-two percent of the operations were estimated to be curative (R0), whereas 58% were palliative (R1, R2). All patients had additional medical treatment and periodical follow-up. Two out of 18 (11%) patients, estimated to have had curative surgery, developed a relapse 42 and 54 months later. R0-resection rates depended on the primary, neighboring, metastasis stage of AE (S1, 100%; S2, 100%; S3a, 33%; S3b, 27%; S4, 11%). During the period 2000-2006 elective radical surgery for AE was done only if a safe distance of at least 2 cm was attainable. This concept was associated with an increased R0-resection rate of 87% for group B compared to 24% for group A. Operative procedures done to control complicated courses of AE (jaundice, cholangitis, vascular compression, bacterial superinfection) have not been curative (R2) in 82% because the disease had spread into irresectable structures. Morbidity was 19%. All patients with curative resections are alive. Fifty-six percent of the patients with palliative treatment are alive as long as 14-237 months, 28% died from AE 164-338 months after diagnosis (late lethality), and 17% died due to others diseases 96-417 months after diagnosis of AE. One out of seven (14%) patients suffering from suppurative parasitic necrosis died because it was impossible to control systemic sepsis (3% hospital lethality). Curative surgery for AE is feasible if the parasitic mass is removable entirely. The earlier the stage, the more frequent is R0 resectability. The observance of a minimal safe distance increases the rate of R0 resections. The benefit of palliative surgery is uncertain due to favorable long-term results of medical treatment alone. However, necrotic tissue is at risk of bacterial superinfection, which can cause life-threatening sepsis. Palliative surgery is an option to treat complications, which could not be managed otherwise.
    Langenbeck s Archives of Surgery 07/2009; 394(4):689-98. · 1.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Infections due to pancreatic necrosis and abscesses are observed in one third of patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Based on results of double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trials, antibiotic prophylaxis in SAP is ineffective for reducing the frequency of infected necrosis and to decrease hospital mortality. Antibiotic treatment using carbapenems and quinolones is indicated on demand in patients with SAP and multiorgan failure at admission and in those with hemodynamic shock. Patients with biliary acute pancreatitis (AP) and clinically acute cholecystitis and/or cholangitis benefit from antibiotic treatment. Patients with AP associated with bacteremia, positive bronchoalveolar lavage, and urinary tract infection should receive antibiotics. In necrotizing pancreatitis, evidence-based data do not support late use of antibiotic prophylaxis after onset. Further high-quality, randomized, controlled trials are needed to evaluate antibiotic prophylaxis in the first 24 to 48 hours after SAP onset.
    Current Infectious Disease Reports 04/2009; 11(2):101-7.
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    ABSTRACT: Cystic neoplastic lesions of the pancreas are found in up to 10% of all pancreatic lesions. A malignant transformation of cystic neoplasia is observed in intraductal papillary mucinous tumor (IPMN) lesions in 60% and in mucinous cystic tumor (MCN) lesions in up to 30%. For cystic neoplasia located monocentrically in the pancreatic head and that do not have an association with an invasive pancreatic cancer, the duodenum-preserving total head resection has been used in recent time as a limited surgical procedure. An indication to duodenum-preserving total pancreatic head resection is considered for patients who do not have clinical signs of an advanced cancer in the lesion and who have main-duct IPMN and monocentric MCN lesions. In 104 patients with cystic neoplastic lesions in the Ulm series, 32% finally had a carcinoma in situ or an advanced pancreatic cancer. The application of a duodenum-preserving total pancreatic head resection in patients with asymptomatic cystic lesion is based on the size of the tumor and the tumor relation to the pancreatic ducts. For patients who have preoperatively clinical signs of malignancy, a Kausch-Whipple type of oncologic resection is recommended. Duodenum-preserving total pancreatic head resection is used in several modifications. The surgical procedure is a limited pancreatic head resection which necessitates segmental resection of the peripapillary duodenum. Hospital mortality is very low; in most published series it is 0%. The long-term outcome is determined by completeness of resection for both -- benign and malignant -- entities. Careful evaluation of the frozen section results has a pivotal role for intraoperative decision making. A duodenum-preserving total pancreatic head resection is a limited surgical procedure for patients who suffer a local monocentric, cystic neoplastic lesion in the pancreatic head. Absence of an advanced pancreatic cancer and completeness of extirpation of the benign tumor determine the long-term outcome. In regards to the location of the lesion in the pancreatic head, several modifications have been applied with low hospital morbidity and mortality below 1%.
    Langenbeck s Archives of Surgery 08/2008; 393(4):589-98. · 1.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The significance of endotoxemia in man is controversial, induces cytokine release and stimulates the immune system. Exaggerated cytokine release of mononuclear cells was observed in acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). However, repetitive administration of endotoxin can cause tolerance. To investigate endotoxemia, plasma TNFalpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, the liberation capacity of those cytokines from mononuclear cells after LPS challenge (Delta values), and plasma antibodies to endotoxins and alpha-hemolysin of Staphylococcus aureus in ALI/ARDS. A prospective clinical study was conducted. The study was carried out at the University Hospital Ulm, Ulm, Germany. The respondents were 23 patients with ALI/ARDS. ALI/ARDS was defined according to the American-European Consensus Conference on ARDS. Blood was collected periodically. Parameters were measured by LAL or ELISA. ARDS (P(a)O(2)/F(i)O(2) < 200) revealed higher endotoxemia (0.22-0.46 [0.06-1.15] EU/mL vs 0.05-0.14 [0.02-0.63] EU/mL) than ALI (P(a)O(2)/F(i)O(2) > 200) but lower DeltaIL-6 (124-209 [10-1214] pg/mL vs 298-746 [5-1797] pg/mL), DeltaTNFalpha (50-100 [6-660] pg/mL vs 143-243 [12-2795] pg/mL), and DeltaIL-1 (2-3 [0-26] pg/mL vs 2-14 [0-99] pg/mL). Endotoxemia correlated negative with P(a)O(2)/F(i)O(2) (r, -0.44 to -0.50). All patients presented antibodies to lipopolysaccharides and alpha-hemolysin, but the level did not correlate with P(a)O(2)/F(i)O(2). ALI/ARDS is associated with endotoxemia. The more severe the disease, the more intense is endotoxemia but the lower is the capacity of mononuclear cells to release cytokines (tolerance). Antibodies against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria are detectable in the plasma but without relation to P(a)O(2)/F(i)O(2).
    Langenbeck s Archives of Surgery 08/2008; 393(4):473-8. · 1.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cigarette smoking increases the risk of cancer of the pancreas. The tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) is the only known environmental compound that induces pancreatic cancer in laboratory animals. Concentrations of NNK are significantly higher in the pancreatic juice of smokers than in that of nonsmokers. The chiral NNK metabolite, (R,S)-4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) is itself a potent pancreatic carcinogen in rats. The carcinogenicity of NNAL is related to its stereochemistry; (S)-NNAL is a more potent lung tumorigen in the A/J mouse than is (R)-NNAL. In this study, we determined the potential of the human pancreas to convert NNK into NNAL. Human pancreatic microsomes and cytosols were incubated with [5-(3)H]NNK, and the metabolic products were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). (S)-NNAL was the predominant isomer formed in all cytosolic incubations. In ten microsomal samples, NNAL was formed at an average rate of 3.8 +/- 1.6 pmol/mg/min; (R)-NNAL was the predominant isomer in this group. The average rate of NNAL formation in 18 other microsomal samples was significantly lower, 0.13 +/- 0.12 pmol/mg/min (p < 0.001); (S)-NNAL was the predominant isomer formed in this group. In human pancreatic tissues, there is intraindividual variability regarding the capacity for, and stereoselectivity of, carbonyl reduction of NNK.
    Langenbeck s Archives of Surgery 07/2008; 393(4):571-9. · 1.89 Impact Factor
  • H G Beger, B M Rau, F Gansauge, B Poch
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: For treatment of inflammatory and benign neoplastic lesions of the pancreatic head, a subtotal or total pancreatic head resection is a limited surgical procedure with the impact of replacing the application of a Whipple procedure. The objective of this work is to describe the technical modifications of subtotal and total pancreatic head resection for inflammatory and neoplastic lesions of the pancreas. The advantages of this limited surgical procedure are the preservation of the stomach, the duodenum and the extrahepatic biliary ducts for treatment of benign lesions of the pancreatic head, papilla, and intrapancreatic segment of the common bile duct. For chronic pancreatitis with an inflammatory mass complicated by compression of the common bile duct or causing multiple pancreatic main duct stenoses and dilatations, a subtotal pancreatic head resection results in a long-lasting pain control. Performing, in addition, a biliary anastomosis or a Partington Rochelle type of pancreatic main duct drainage, respectively, is a logic and simple extension of the procedure. The rationale for the application of duodenum-preserving total pancreatic head resection for cystic neoplastic lesions are complete exstirpation of the tumor and, as a consequence, interruption of carcinogenesis of the neoplasia preventing development of pancreatic cancer. Duodenum-preserving total head resection necessitates additional biliary and duodenal anastomoses. For mono-centric IPMN, MCN, and SCA tumors, located in the pancreatic head, total duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection can be performed without hospital mortality and resurgery for recurrency. Based on controlled clinical trials, duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection is superior to the Whipple-type resection with regard to lower postoperative morbidity, almost no delay of gastric emptying, preservation of the endocrine function, lower frequency of rehospitalization, early professional rehabilitation, and establishment of a predisease level of quality of life. CONCLUSION: The limited surgical procedures of subtotal or total pancreatic head resection are simple, safe, ensures free tumour margins and replace in the authors institution the application of a Whipple-type head resection.
    Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery 07/2008; 12(6):1127-32. · 2.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Surgery can cause endotoxemia, and endotoxin aggregates to Toll-like receptors and acts proinflammatory; repetitive endotoxin application can cause tolerance. The objective of the study is to characterize early inflammatory response and expression of TLR2/4 during major abdominal surgery. A prospective controlled study of 20 patients with elective major abdominal surgery was performed. Blood samples were collected before and at a defined time after surgery. Endotoxemia, capability of plasma to inactivate endotoxin, cytokine release of LPS-stimulated mononuclear cells, quantitative TLR mRNA expression, and plasma concentrations of TNFalpha, IL-6, C-reactive protein (CRP), alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein, transferrin, and albumin were measured. Surgery caused endotoxemia (p = 0.053), and the capability of plasma to inactivate endotoxin was reduced (p = 0.0002). Two hours postoperatively, the plasma concentrations of TNFalpha and IL-6 peaked significantly, but the liberation capacity of mononuclear cells for cytokines (TNFalpha, IL-1beta, IL-6) was significantly reduced. The concentration of CRP and alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein peaked 48 h postoperatively, but those of transferrin and albumin were significantly decreased (p < 0.001, respectively). Median mRNA expression of TLR2 and TLR4 of mononuclear cells was not altered, and there was no obvious trend over time. Major abdominal surgery is associated with endotoxemia, reduced capability of plasma to inactivate endotoxin, cytokine kinetics resembling those of healthy man after experimentally given LPS, and substantial acute-phase reaction. The cytokine liberation of mononuclear cells suggests a state of postoperative endotoxin tolerance. Despite these substantial changes, trends in TLR2/4 expression are not obvious.
    Langenbeck s Archives of Surgery 06/2008; 394(2):293-302. · 1.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The goal of this Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract postgraduate course was to review critically the highest level of published evidence focused on treating the disabling chronic abdominal pain due to chronic pancreatitis. Just eight randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been reported since 1995. All are from Europe. These eight RCTs utilized 380 patients to compare a diverse variety of surgical resections, surgical drainage vs. endotherapy (trans-ampullary pancreatic stents for drainage), or endotherapy with or without shock wave lithotripsy. Therefore, these trials contained a paucity of patients for each treatment compared. Heterogeneity was evident after analysis of the study designs because they used a diverse set of inclusion and exclusion criteria usually not based on objective criteria such as ductal anatomy. All but one had short follow-up. Because of the lack of homogeneity for these study designs that were somewhat underpowered, the RCTs on the treatment of chronic pancreatitis to relieve disabling abdominal pain must be read carefully. In addition to RCTs, the case series still remains a valuable part of our literature.
    Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery 05/2008; 12(4):640-4. · 2.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cancers of the pancreas are identified in 11 800 to 13 500 patients each year in Germany. Epidemiological studies prove smoking and chronic alcohol consumption as causes of about 30% of pancreatic cancers. Selective literature review. Only patients within TNM stage I and II have after oncologic tumor extirpation a chance for long term survival. Controlled prospective clinical trials demonstrated adjuvant chemotherapy yielding an additional significant survival benefit. The 3- and 5-year-survival after R0-resection and adjuvant chemotherapy are about 30% and below 15% respectively. Using the criteria of observed 5-year-survival less than 2% of all pancreatic cancer patients are alive. After R0-resection the median survival time is between 17 and 28 months, after R1/2-resection between 8 and 22 months. Pancreatic cancer is even today for more than 95% of the patients incurable. Strategies to prevent pancreatic cancer are intended to stop smoking and chronic alcohol consumption and early surgical extirpation of cystic neoplastic lesions. For patients with established pancreatic cancer risk a follow-up protocol is discussed.
    Deutsches Ärzteblatt International 05/2008; 105(14):255-62. · 3.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic pancreatitis (CP), a benign, inflammatory process of the pancreas, can cause severe pain, diabetes mellitus, steatorrhoea, and weight loss and often leads to a significant reduction in the quality of life. In the past decade our knowledge of the pathophysiology of CP has increased together with the number and quality of treatment options available for this disease. In addition to pharmacological and endoscopic treatment modalities, surgical drainage and resection procedures have become increasingly important since they have the potential to provide superior long-term results in patients with CP. The classical and pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy, once the standard operations for patients with CP, have been replaced by organ-sparing procedures like the duodenum preserving pancreatic head resection and its variants. The latter allow better preservation of the exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function, and provide adequate pain relieve and improvement in the quality of life of CP patients.
    Baillière&#x027 s Best Practice and Research in Clinical Gastroenterology 02/2008; 22(1):167-81. · 3.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cystic neoplastic lesions of the pancreas are now found with increasing frequency. Duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection with segmental resection of the duodenum has been introduced for the surgical treatment of inflammatory and neoplastic lesions. We report the following data from 15 patients treated surgically for cystic neoplastic lesions of the pancreas head. Duodenum-preserving total pancreatic head resection (DPPHRt) with segmental resection of the duodenum (SD) was performed in eight patients, five with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), two with mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN), and one with cystic endocrine neoplasm (EN). In four patients, a subtotal pancreatic head resection was performed, but recurrence of the IPMN lesion was observed in two patients. Ten patients suffered cystadenoma, three patients had a borderline lesion, and two patients had an in-situ carcinoma. Eight patients had a DPPHRt with SD resection, two patients had a resection of the uncinate process including segmental resection of the inferior duodenal segment, and one patient had a duodenum-and spleen-preserving total pancreatectomy. In four patients a DPPHR with subtotal pancreatic head resection was carried out. Postoperative local complications occurred in eight patients: there was a recurrence of the IPMN lesion in the remnant pancreatic head in two patients; and there was intraabdominal bleeding in one patient, pancreatic fistula in one patient, and delay of gastric emptying in four patients. Seven patients showed signs of acute pancreatitis. Hospital mortality was 0%, and postoperative length of hospital stay was 10. 4 days (range, 8-18 days). Duodenum-preserving total pancreatic head resection for IPMN, MCN, serous cystadenoma (SCA), and cystic EN lesions is a safe and beneficial surgical procedure. Segmental resection of the duodenum was applied for an oncologically complete resection. In regard to long-term outcome, the procedure is, additionally, a pancreatic cancer preventive strategy.
    Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery 02/2008; 15(2):149-56. · 1.60 Impact Factor

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Institutions

  • 1983–2014
    • Universität Ulm
      • • Institute of General Medicine
      • • Clinic of General and Visceral Surgery
      Ulm, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
  • 2008–2013
    • BGPS Neu-Ulm Onkologische, endokrinologische und minimalinvasive Chirurgie
      Neu-Ulm, Bavaria, Germany
    • Technische Universität München
      • Clinic and Polyclinic for Surgery
      München, Bavaria, Germany
  • 2003–2007
    • Universität des Saarlandes
      • Institut für Medizinische Mikrobiologie und Hygiene
      Saarbrücken, Saarland, Germany
    • Mount Sinai Medical Center
      New York City, New York, United States
    • Institutul Clinic Fundeni
      Bucureşti, Bucureşti, Romania
  • 2004
    • Ostalb Hospital Aalen
      Aalen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
    • Hannover Medical School
      • Department of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology
      Hannover, Lower Saxony, Germany
    • University of Freiburg
      Freiburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
  • 2001–2004
    • University of Liverpool
      Liverpool, England, United Kingdom
    • Wistar Institute
      • Melanoma Research Center
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
    • Beijing Medical University
      Peping, Beijing, China
  • 2002
    • University of Bologna
      Bolonia, Emilia-Romagna, Italy
  • 1992–2001
    • University of California, Irvine
      • Department of Medicine
      Irvine, CA, United States
  • 2000
    • Krankenhaus Barmherzige Brüder München
      München, Bavaria, Germany
  • 1999–2000
    • The University of Tokyo
      • Department of Surgical Sciences
      Tokyo, Tokyo-to, Japan
  • 1998
    • Damascus University
      Dimashq, Damascus City, Syria
  • 1997
    • The Queen Elizabeth Hospital
      Tarndarnya, South Australia, Australia
    • Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham
      Birmingham, England, United Kingdom
  • 1986–1997
    • Georgia Health Sciences University
      • Department of Cellular Biology & Anatomy
      Augusta, GA, United States
  • 1996
    • University of Pittsburgh
      • Department of Surgery
      Pittsburgh, PA, United States
  • 1994–1996
    • Marienhospital Stuttgart
      Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
  • 1995
    • University of Tuebingen
      • Department of Paediatric Surgery
      Tübingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
  • 1993
    • Cleveland Clinic
      • Department of Cancer Biology
      Cleveland, OH, United States
  • 1988
    • University of Turku
      • Department of Pathology
      Turku, Western Finland, Finland
  • 1977–1983
    • Freie Universität Berlin
      Berlín, Berlin, Germany
  • 1974
    • Neurologische Klinik Westend
      Бад Вилдунген, Hesse, Germany