James A H Murray

Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom

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Publications (70)470.38 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: In Arabidopsis, stem cells maintain the provision of new cells for root growth. They surround a group of slowly dividing cells named the quiescent center (QC), and, together, they form the stem cell niche (SCN). The QC acts as the signaling center of the SCN, repressing differentiation of the surrounding stem cells [1] and providing a pool of cells able to replace damaged stem cells [2, 3]. Maintenance of the stem cells depends on the transcription factor WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX 5 (WOX5), which is specifically expressed in the QC [4]. However, the molecular mechanisms by which WOX5 promotes stem cell fate and whether WOX5 regulates proliferation of the QC are unknown. Here, we reveal a new role for WOX5 in restraining cell division in the cells of the QC, thereby establishing quiescence. In contrast, WOX5 and CYCD3;3/CYCD1;1 both promote cell proliferation in the nascent columella. The additional QC divisions occurring in wox5 mutants are suppressed in mutant combinations with the D type cyclins CYCD3;3 and CYCD1;1. Moreover, ectopic expression of CYCD3;3 in the QC is sufficient to induce cell division in the QC. WOX5 thus suppresses QC divisions that are otherwise promoted by CYCD3;3 and CYCD1;1, in part by interacting with the CYCD3;3 promoter to repress CYCD3;3 expression in the QC. Therefore, we propose a specific role for WOX5 in initiating and maintaining quiescence of the QC by excluding CYCD activity from the QC.
    Current biology : CB. 08/2014;
  • Simon Scofield, Angharad Jones, James A H Murray
    Journal of Experimental Botany 06/2014; 65(10):2557-62. · 5.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Arabidopsis class-1 KNOX gene SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM) encodes a homeodomain transcription factor essential for shoot apical meristem (SAM) formation and sustained activity. STM activates cytokinin biosynthesis in the SAM, but it is unclear the extent to which STM function is mediated through cytokinin. Here we show that STM inhibits cellular differentiation and endoreduplication, acting through cytokinin and the cytokinin-inducible CYCD3 cell cycle regulators, establishing a mechanistic link to cell cycle control which provides sustained mitotic activity to maintain a pool of undifferentiated cells in the SAM. Equivalent functions are revealed for the related KNOX genes KNAT1/BP and KNAT2 through ectopic expression. STM is also required for proper meristem organisation and can induce de novo meristem formation when expressed ectopically, even when cytokinin levels are reduced or cytokinin signaling is impaired. This function in meristem establishment and organisation can be replaced by KNAT1/BP, but not KNAT2, despite its activation of CK responses, suggesting promotion of CK responses alone is insufficient for SAM organisation. We propose that STM has dual cellular and meristem-organisational functions that are differentially represented in the class-1 KNOX gene family and have differing requirements for CK and CYCD3. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    The Plant Journal 04/2013; · 6.82 Impact Factor
  • Bo Wen, Jeroen Nieuwland, James A H Murray
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    ABSTRACT: The coordination of plant cell division and expansion controls plant morphogenesis, development, and growth. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are not only key regulators of cell division but also play an important role in cell differentiation. In plants, CDK activity is modulated by the binding of INHIBITOR OF CDK/KIP-RELATED PROTEIN (ICK/KRP). Previously, ICK2/KRP2 has been shown to mediate auxin responses in lateral root initiation. Here are analysed the roles of all ICK/KRP genes in root growth. Analysis of ick/krp null-mutants revealed that only ick3/krp5 was affected in primary root growth. ICK3/KRP5 is strongly expressed in the root apical meristem (RAM), with lower expression in the expansion zone. ick3/krp5 roots grow more slowly than wildtype controls, and this results not from reduction of division in the proliferative region of the RAM but rather reduced expansion as cells exit the meristem. This leads to shorter final cell lengths in different tissues of the ick3/krp5 mutant root, particularly the epidermal non-hair cells, and this reduction in cell size correlates with reduced endoreduplication. Loss of ICK3/KRP5 also leads to delayed germination and in the mature embryo ICK3/KRP5 is specifically expressed in the transition zone between root and hypocotyl. Cells in the transition zone were smaller in the ick3/krp5 mutant, despite the absence of endoreduplication in the embryo suggesting a direct effect of ICK3/KRP5 on cell growth. It is concluded that ICK3/KRP5 is a positive regulator of both cell growth and endoreduplication.
    Journal of Experimental Botany 03/2013; 64(4):1-13. · 5.79 Impact Factor
    This article is viewable in ResearchGate's enriched format
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Aims: Chloroquine (CQ) kills Plasmodium falciparum by binding heme, preventing its detoxification to hemozoin in the digestive vacuole (DV) of the parasite. CQ resistance (CQR) is associated with mutations in the DV membrane protein P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT), mediating the leakage of CQ from the DV. However, additional factors are thought to contribute to the resistance phenotype. This study tested the hypothesis that there is a link between glutathione (GSH) and CQR. Results: Using isogenic parasite lines carrying wild-type or mutant pfcrt, we reveal lower levels of GSH in the mutant lines and enhanced sensitivity to the GSH synthesis inhibitor l-buthionine sulfoximine, without any alteration in cytosolic de novo GSH synthesis. Incubation with N-acetylcysteine resulted in increased GSH levels in all parasites, but only reduced susceptibility to CQ in PfCRT mutant-expressing lines. In support of a heme destruction mechanism involving GSH in CQR parasites, we also found lower hemozoin levels and reduced CQ binding in the CQR PfCRT-mutant lines. We further demonstrate via expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes that the mutant alleles of Pfcrt in CQR parasites selectively transport GSH. Innovation: We propose a mechanism whereby mutant pfcrt allows enhanced transport of GSH into the parasite's DV. The elevated levels of GSH in the DV reduce the level of free heme available for CQ binding, which mediates the lower susceptibility to CQ in the PfCRT mutant parasites. Conclusion: PfCRT has a dual role in CQR, facilitating both efflux of harmful CQ from the DV and influx of beneficial GSH into the DV. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.
    Antioxidants & Redox Signaling 12/2012; · 8.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The shoot apical meristem (SAM) is a small population of stem cells that continuously generates organs and tissues. This review covers our current understanding of organ initiation by the SAM in Arabidopsis thaliana. Meristem function and maintenance involves two major hormones, cytokinins and auxins. Cytokinins appear to play a major role in meristem maintenance and in controlling meristematic properties, such as cell proliferation. Self-organizing transport processes, which are still only partially understood, lead to the patterned accumulation of auxin at particular positions, where organs will grow out. A major downstream target of auxin-mediated growth regulation is the cell wall, which is a determinant for both growth rates and growth distribution, but feedbacks with metabolism and the synthetic capacity of the cytoplasm are crucial as well. Recent work has also pointed at a potential role of mechanical signals in growth coordination, but the precise mechanisms at work remain to be elucidated.
    The Plant Cell 10/2012; · 9.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In plants, where cells cannot migrate, asymmetric cell divisions (ACDs) must be confined to the appropriate spatial context. We investigate tissue-generating asymmetric divisions in a stem cell daughter within the Arabidopsis root. Spatial restriction of these divisions requires physical binding of the stem cell regulator SCARECROW (SCR) by the RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED (RBR) protein. In the stem cell niche, SCR activity is counteracted by phosphorylation of RBR through a cyclinD6;1-CDK complex. This cyclin is itself under transcriptional control of SCR and its partner SHORT ROOT (SHR), creating a robust bistable circuit with either high or low SHR-SCR complex activity. Auxin biases this circuit by promoting CYCD6;1 transcription. Mathematical modeling shows that ACDs are only switched on after integration of radial and longitudinal information, determined by SHR and auxin distribution, respectively. Coupling of cell-cycle progression to protein degradation resets the circuit, resulting in a "flip flop" that constrains asymmetric cell division to the stem cell region.
    Cell 08/2012; 150(5):1002-15. · 31.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is an increasing need for quantitative technologies suitable for molecular detection in a variety of settings for applications including food traceability and monitoring of genetically modified (GM) crops and their products through the food processing chain. Conventional molecular diagnostics utilising real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and fluorescence-based determination of amplification require temperature cycling and relatively complex optics. In contrast, isothermal amplification coupled to a bioluminescent output produced in real-time (BART) occurs at a constant temperature and only requires a simple light detection and integration device. Loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) shows robustness to sample-derived inhibitors. Here we show the applicability of coupled LAMP and BART reactions (LAMP-BART) for determination of genetically modified (GM) maize target DNA at low levels of contamination (0.1-5.0% GM) using certified reference material, and compare this to RT-PCR. Results show that conventional DNA extraction methods developed for PCR may not be optimal for LAMP-BART quantification. Additionally, we demonstrate that LAMP is more tolerant to plant sample-derived inhibitors, and show this can be exploited to develop rapid extraction techniques suitable for simple field-based qualitative tests for GM status determination. We also assess the effect of total DNA assay load on LAMP-BART quantitation. LAMP-BART is an effective and sensitive technique for GM detection with significant potential for quantification even at low levels of contamination and in samples derived from crops such as maize with a large genome size. The resilience of LAMP-BART to acidic polysaccharides makes it well suited to rapid sample preparation techniques and hence to both high throughput laboratory settings and to portable GM detection applications. The impact of the plant sample matrix and genome loading within a reaction must be controlled to ensure quantification at low target concentrations.
    BMC Biotechnology 04/2012; 12:15. · 2.59 Impact Factor
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    Carl Collins, Walter Dewitte, James A H Murray
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    ABSTRACT: Seed development in Arabidopsis is characterized by stereotypical division patterns, suggesting that coordinated control of cell cycle may be required for correct patterning and growth of the embryo and endosperm. D-type cyclins (CYCD) are key cell cycle regulators with roles in developmental processes, but knowledge regarding their involvement in seed development remains limited. Here, a family-wide gene expression, and loss- and gain-of-function approach was adopted to reveal additional functions for CYCDs in the development of seed tissues. CYCD genes have both discrete and overlapping tissue-specific expression patterns in the seed as revealed by GUS reporter gene expression. Analysis of different mutant combinations revealed that correct CYCD levels are required in seed development. The CYCD3 subgroup is specifically required as its loss caused delayed development, whereas overexpression in the embryo and endosperm of CYCD3;1 or a previously uncharacterized gene, CYCD7;1, variously leads to induced proliferation, abnormal phenotypes, and elevated seed abortion. CYCD3;1 overexpression provoked a delay in embryonic developmental progression and abnormalities including additional divisions of the hypophysis and suspensor, regions where CYCD3 genes are normally expressed, but did not affect endosperm development. Overexpression of CYCD7;1, not normally expressed in seed development, promoted overgrowth of both embryo and endosperm through increased division and cell enlargement. In contrast to post-germination growth, where pattern and organ size is not generally related to division, results suggest that a close control of cell division through regulation of CYCD activity is important during seed development in conferring both developmental rate and correct patterning.
    Journal of Experimental Botany 03/2012; 63(10):3571-86. · 5.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The integration of cell division in root growth and development requires mediation of developmental and physiological signals through regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase activity. Cells within the pericycle form de novo lateral root meristems, and D-type cyclins (CYCD), as regulators of the G₁-to-S phase cell cycle transition, are anticipated to play a role. Here, we show that the D-type cyclin protein CYCD2;1 is nuclear in Arabidopsis thaliana root cells, with the highest concentration in apical and lateral meristems. Loss of CYCD2;1 has a marginal effect on unstimulated lateral root density, but CYCD2;1 is rate-limiting for the response to low levels of exogenous auxin. However, while CYCD2;1 expression requires sucrose, it does not respond to auxin. The protein Inhibitor-Interactor of CDK/Kip Related Protein2 (ICK2/KRP2), which interacts with CYCD2;1, inhibits lateral root formation, and ick2/krp2 mutants show increased lateral root density. ICK2/KRP2 can modulate the nuclear levels of CYCD2;1, and since auxin reduces ICK2/KRP2 protein levels, it affects both activity and cellular distribution of CYCD2;1. Hence, as ICK2/KRP2 levels decrease, the increase in lateral root density depends on CYCD2;1, irrespective of ICK2/CYCD2;1 nuclear localization. We propose that ICK2/KRP2 restrains root ramification by maintaining CYCD2;1 inactive and that this modulates pericycle responses to auxin fluctuations.
    The Plant Cell 02/2011; 23(2):641-60. · 9.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In plant post-embryonic epidermis mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling promotes differentiation of pavement cells and inhibits initiation of stomata. Stomata are cells specialized to modulate gas exchange and water loss. Arabidopsis MAPKs MPK3 and MPK6 are at the core of the signaling cascade; however, it is not well understood how the activity of these pleiotropic MAPKs is constrained spatially so that pavement cell differentiation is promoted only outside the stomata lineage. Here we identified a PP2C-type phosphatase termed AP2C3 (Arabidopsis protein phosphatase 2C) that is expressed distinctively during stomata development as well as interacts and inactivates MPK3, MPK4 and MPK6. AP2C3 co-localizes with MAPKs within the nucleus and this localization depends on its N-terminal extension. We show that other closely related phosphatases AP2C2 and AP2C4 are also MAPK phosphatases acting on MPK6, but have a distinct expression pattern from AP2C3. In accordance with this, only AP2C3 ectopic expression is able to stimulate cell proliferation leading to excess stomata development. This function of AP2C3 relies on the domains required for MAPK docking and intracellular localization. Concomitantly, the constitutive and inducible AP2C3 expression deregulates E2F-RB pathway, promotes the abundance and activity of CDKA, as well as changes of CDKB1;1 forms. We suggest that AP2C3 downregulates the MAPK signaling activity to help maintain the balance between differentiation of stomata and pavement cells.
    PLoS ONE 12/2010; 5(12):e15357. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The real-time monitoring of polynucleotide amplification is at the core of most molecular assays. This conventionally relies on fluorescent detection of the amplicon produced, requiring complex and costly hardware, often restricting it to specialised laboratories. Here we report the first real-time, closed-tube luminescent reporter system for nucleic acid amplification technologies (NAATs) enabling the progress of amplification to be continuously monitored using simple light measuring equipment. The Bioluminescent Assay in Real-Time (BART) continuously reports through bioluminescent output the exponential increase of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) produced during the isothermal amplification of a specific nucleic acid target. BART relies on the coupled conversion of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) produced stoichiometrically during nucleic acid synthesis to ATP by the enzyme ATP sulfurylase, and can therefore be coupled to a wide range of isothermal NAATs. During nucleic acid amplification, enzymatic conversion of PPi released during DNA synthesis into ATP is continuously monitored through the bioluminescence generated by thermostable firefly luciferase. The assay shows a unique kinetic signature for nucleic acid amplifications with a readily identifiable light output peak, whose timing is proportional to the concentration of original target nucleic acid. This allows qualitative and quantitative analysis of specific targets, and readily differentiates between negative and positive samples. Since quantitation in BART is based on determination of time-to-peak rather than absolute intensity of light emission, complex or highly sensitive light detectors are not required. The combined chemistries of the BART reporter and amplification require only a constant temperature maintained by a heating block and are shown to be robust in the analysis of clinical samples. Since monitoring the BART reaction requires only a simple light detector, the iNAAT-BART combination is ideal for molecular diagnostic assays in both laboratory and low resource settings.
    PLoS ONE 11/2010; 5(11):e14155. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Stomata, which are epidermal pores surrounded by two guard cells, develop from a specialized stem cell lineage and function in shoot gas exchange. The Arabidopsis thaliana FOUR LIPS (FLP) and MYB88 genes encode closely related and atypical two-MYB-repeat proteins, which when mutated result in excess divisions and abnormal groups of stomata in contact. Consistent with a role in transcription, we show here that FLP and MYB88 are nuclear proteins with DNA binding preferences distinct from other known MYBs. To identify possible FLP/MYB88 transcriptional targets, we used chromatin immunoprecitation (ChIP) followed by hybridization to Arabidopsis whole genome tiling arrays. These ChIP-chip data indicate that FLP/MYB88 target the upstream regions especially of cell cycle genes, including cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), and components of the prereplication complex. In particular, we show that FLP represses the expression of the mitosis-inducing factor CDKB1;1, which, along with CDKB1;2, is specifically required both for the last division in the stomatal pathway and for cell overproliferation in flp mutants. We propose that FLP and MYB88 together integrate patterning with the control of cell cycle progression and terminal differentiation through multiple and direct cell cycle targets. FLP recognizes a distinct cis-regulatory element that overlaps with that of the cell cycle activator E2F-DP in the CDKB1;1 promoter, suggesting that these MYBs may also modulate E2F-DP pathways.
    The Plant Cell 07/2010; 22(7):2306-21. · 9.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: DNA replication programs have been studied extensively in yeast and animal systems, where they have been shown to correlate with gene expression and certain epigenetic modifications. Despite the conservation of core DNA replication proteins, little is known about replication programs in plants. We used flow cytometry and tiling microarrays to profile DNA replication of Arabidopsis thaliana chromosome 4 (chr4) during early, mid, and late S phase. Replication profiles for early and mid S phase were similar and encompassed the majority of the euchromatin. Late S phase exhibited a distinctly different profile that includes the remaining euchromatin and essentially all of the heterochromatin. Termination zones were consistent between experiments, allowing us to define 163 putative replicons on chr4 that clustered into larger domains of predominately early or late replication. Early-replicating sequences, especially the initiation zones of early replicons, displayed a pattern of epigenetic modifications specifying an open chromatin conformation. Late replicons, and the termination zones of early replicons, showed an opposite pattern. Histone H3 acetylated on lysine 56 (H3K56ac) was enriched in early replicons, as well as the initiation zones of both early and late replicons. H3K56ac was also associated with expressed genes, but this effect was local whereas replication time correlated with H3K56ac over broad regions. The similarity of the replication profiles for early and mid S phase cells indicates that replication origin activation in euchromatin is stochastic. Replicon organization in Arabidopsis is strongly influenced by epigenetic modifications to histones and DNA. The domain organization of Arabidopsis is more similar to that in Drosophila than that in mammals, which may reflect genome size and complexity. The distinct patterns of association of H3K56ac with gene expression and early replication provide evidence that H3K56ac may be associated with initiation zones and replication origins.
    PLoS Genetics 06/2010; 6(6):e1000982. · 8.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In Arabidopsis thaliana, biosynthesis of the essential thiol antioxidant, glutathione (GSH), is plastid-regulated, but many GSH functions, including heavy metal detoxification and plant defense activation, depend on cytosolic GSH. This finding suggests that plastid and cytosol thiol pools are closely integrated and we show that in Arabidopsis this integration requires a family of three plastid thiol transporters homologous to the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine-resistance transporter, PfCRT. Arabidopsis mutants lacking these transporters are heavy metal-sensitive, GSH-deficient, and hypersensitive to Phytophthora infection, confirming a direct requirement for correct GSH homeostasis in defense responses. Compartment-specific measurements of the glutathione redox potential using redox-sensitive GFP showed that knockout of the entire transporter family resulted in a more oxidized glutathione redox potential in the cytosol, but not in the plastids, indicating the GSH-deficient phenotype is restricted to the cytosolic compartment. Expression of the transporters in Xenopus oocytes confirmed that each can mediate GSH uptake. We conclude that these transporters play a significant role in regulating GSH levels and the redox potential of the cytosol.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 02/2010; 107(5):2331-2336. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Root cell division occurs primarily in the apical meristem, from which cells are displaced into the basal meristem, where division decreases and cell length increases before the final differentiation zone. The organization of the root in concentric files implies coordinated division and differentiation of cell types, including the xylem pole pericycle cells, which uniquely can resume division to initiate lateral roots (LR). Here, we show that D-type cyclin CYCD4;1 is expressed in meristematic pericycle protoxylem poles and is required for normal LR density. Cycd4;1 mutants also show a displacement of the apical/basal meristem boundary in the pericycle and longer pericycle basal meristem cells, whereas other cell layers and overall meristem size and root growth are unaffected. Auxin is proposed to separately prepattern and stimulate LR initiation. Stimulation is unimpaired in cycd4;1, suggesting CYCD4;1 requirement for normal spacing but not initiation. Both pericycle cell length and LR density phenotypes of cycd4;1 are rescued by low concentrations of applied auxin, suggesting that the basal meristem has a role in determining LR density. We further show CYCD4;1 is rate-limiting for sucrose-dependent LR formation, since CYCD4;1 expression is sucrose-dependent and wild-type roots fully phenocopy cycd4;1 in sucrose absence. We conclude that CYCD4;1 links meristem pericycle cell behavior to LR density consistent with a basal meristem prepatterning model and that D-type cyclins can confer division potential of defined cell types through cell-specific expression patterns.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 12/2009; 106(52):22528-33. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In plants, the phytohormone auxin is a crucial regulator sustaining growth and development. At the cellular level, auxin is interpreted differentially in a tissue- and dose-dependent manner. Mechanisms of auxin signalling are partially unknown and the contribution of the AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN 1 (ABP1) as an auxin receptor is still a matter of debate. Here we took advantage of the present knowledge of the root biological system to demonstrate that ABP1 is required for auxin response. The use of conditional ABP1 defective plants reveals that the protein is essential for maintenance of the root meristem and acts at least on the D-type CYCLIN/RETINOBLASTOMA pathway to control entry into the cell cycle. ABP1 affects PLETHORA gradients and confers auxin sensitivity to root cells thus defining the competence of the cells to be maintained within the meristem or to elongate. ABP1 is also implicated in the regulation of gene expression in response to auxin. Our data support that ABP1 is a key regulator for root growth and is required for auxin-mediated responses. Differential effects of ABP1 on various auxin responses support a model in which ABP1 is the major regulator for auxin action on the cell cycle and regulates auxin-mediated gene expression and cell elongation in addition to the already well known TIR1-mediated ubiquitination pathway.
    PLoS ONE 09/2009; 4(9):e6648. · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • Jeroen Nieuwland, Simon Scofield, James A H Murray
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    ABSTRACT: The core mechanism of the plant cell cycle is conserved with all other eukaryotes but several aspects are unique to plant cells. Key characteristics of plant development include indeterminate growth and repetitive organogenesis derived from stem cell pools and they may explain the existence of the high number of cell cycle regulators in plants. In this review, we give an overview of the plant cell cycle and its regulatory components. Furthermore, we discuss the cell cycle aspects of plant stem cell maintenance and how the cell cycle relates to cellular differentiation during development. We exemplify this transition by focusing on organ initiation in the shoot.
    Seminars in Cell and Developmental Biology 09/2009; 20(9):1134-42. · 6.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Activation of E2F transcription factors at the G1-to-S phase boundary, with the resultant expression of genes needed for DNA synthesis and S-phase, is due to phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma-related (RBR) protein by cyclin D-dependent kinase (CYCD-CDK), particularly CYCD3-CDKA. Arabidopsis has three canonical E2F genes, of which E2Fa and E2Fb are proposed to encode transcriptional activators and E2Fc a repressor. Previous studies have identified genes regulated in response to high-level constitutive expression of E2Fa and of CYCD3;1, but such plants display significant phenotypic abnormalities. We have sought to identify targets that show responses to lower level induced changes in abundance of these cell cycle regulators. Expression of E2Fa, E2Fc or CYCD3;1 was induced using dexamethasone and the effects analysed using microarrays in a time course allowing short and longer term effects to be observed. Overlap between CYCD3;1 and E2Fa modulated genes substantiates their action in a common pathway with a key role in controlling the G1/S transition, with additional targets for CYCD3;1 in chromatin modification and for E2Fa in cell wall biogenesis and development. E2Fc induction led primarily to gene downregulation, but did not antagonise E2Fa action and hence E2Fc appears to function outside the CYCD3-RBR pathway, does not have a direct effect on cell cycle genes, and promoter analysis suggests a distinct binding site preference.
    Plant Molecular Biology 09/2009; 71(4-5):345-65. · 4.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In darkness, shoot apex growth is repressed, but it becomes rapidly activated by light. We show that phytochromes and cryptochromes play largely redundant roles in this derepression in Arabidopsis thaliana. We examined the light activation of transcriptional changes in a finely resolved time course, comparing the shoot apex (meristem and leaf primordia) and the cotyledon and found >5700 differentially expressed genes. Early events specific to the shoot apices included the repression of genes for Really Interesting New Gene finger proteins and basic domain/leucine zipper and basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors. The downregulation of auxin and ethylene and the upregulation of cytokinin and gibberellin hormonal responses were also characteristic of shoot apices. In the apex, genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and protein translation were rapidly and synchronously induced, simultaneously with cell proliferation genes, preceding visible organ growth. Subsequently, the activation of signaling genes and transcriptional signatures of cell wall expansion, turgor generation, and plastid biogenesis were apparent. Furthermore, light regulates the forms and protein levels of two transcription factors with opposing functions in cell proliferation, E2FB and E2FC, through the Constitutively Photomorphogenic1 (COP1), COP9-Signalosome5, and Deetiolated1 light signaling molecules. These data provide the basis for reconstruction of the regulatory networks for light-regulated meristem, leaf, and cotyledon development.
    The Plant Cell 04/2008; 20(4):947-68. · 9.58 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

4k Citations
470.38 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2014
    • Cardiff University
      • School of Biosciences
      Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom
  • 1992–2012
    • University of Cambridge
      • • Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology
      • • Department of Genetics
      Cambridge, England, United Kingdom
  • 2010
    • Lumora Ltd
      Ely, England, United Kingdom
  • 1996
    • Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
      Cold Spring Harbor, New York, United States