Liisa M Jantunen

Stockholm University, Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden

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Publications (64)192.34 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Sea ice facilitates delivery of organic contaminants to the Arctic marine food web. • Organic contaminants are concentrated in brine, under-ice seawater, and melt ponds. • We model contaminant concentrations in melt ponds based on air concentrations. • CUPs pose a risk of increased exposures via dry deposition to melt ponds. • Dry deposition to melt ponds is important loading route of CUPs to the Arctic Ocean. For decades sea ice has been perceived as a physical barrier for the loading of contaminants to the Arctic Ocean. We show that sea ice, in fact, facilitates the delivery of organic contaminants to the Arctic marine food web through processes that: 1) are independent of contaminant physical–chemical properties (e.g. 2–3-fold increase in exposure to brine-associated biota), and 2) depend on physical–chemical properties and, therefore, differen-tiate between contaminants (e.g. atmospheric loading of contaminants to melt ponds over the summer, and their subsequent leakage to the ocean). We estimate the concentrations of legacy organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and current-use pesticides (CUPs) in melt pond water in the Beaufort Sea, Canadian High Arctic, in 2008, at near-gas exchange equilibrium based on Henry's law constants (HLCs), air concentrations and exchange dynamics. CUPs currently present the highest risk of increased exposures through melt pond loading and drain-age due to the high ratio of melt pond water to seawater concentration (Melt pond Enrichment Factor, MEF), which ranges from 2 for dacthal to 10 for endosulfan I. Melt pond contaminant enrichment can be perceived as a hypothetical 'pump' delivering contaminants from the atmosphere to the ocean under ice-covered condi-tions, with 2–10% of CUPs annually entering the Beaufort Sea via this input route compared to the standing stock in the Polar Mixed Layer of the ocean. The abovementioned processes are strongly favored in first-year ice compared to multi-year ice and, therefore, the dynamic balance between contaminant inventories and con-taminant deposition to the surface ocean is being widely affected by the large-scale icescape transition taking place in the Arctic.
    Science of The Total Environment 01/2015; 506-507:444. · 3.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Concentrations of organobromine (BFRs), organochlorine (CFRs) and organophosphate esters flame retardants and plasticizers (PFRs) in air were monitored for over one year at an urban site in Toronto, Canada during 2010–2011. The mean value for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs) (gas + particle phase) was 38 pg/m3 with BDE-47 and BDE-99 as the dominant congeners. The mean concentrations in air for ∑non-BDE (BFRs and CFRs), was 9.6 pg/m3 – about four times lower than the BDEs. The brominated FRs: TBP-AE, BTBPE, EH-TBB, BEH-TEBP and the chlorinated syn- and anti-DP were detected frequently, ranging from 87% to 96%. Highest concentrations in air among all flame retardant classes were observed for the Σ-PFRs. The yearly mean concentration in air for ΣPFRs was 2643 pg/m3 with detection frequency higher than 80%. Except for TBP-AE and b- DBE-DBCH, non-BDEs (BFRs, CFRs and PFRs) were mainly associated with the particle phase. BDE concentrations in air were positively correlated with temperature indicating that volatilization from local sources was an important factor controlling levels in air. This correlation did not hold for most BFRs, CFRs and PFRs which were mainly on particles. For these compounds, air concentrations in Toronto are likely related to emissions from point sources and advective inputs. This study highlights the importance of urban air monitoring for FRs. Urban air can be considered a sentinel for detecting changes in the use and application of FRs in commercial products.
    Atmospheric Environment 12/2014; 99:140–147. · 3.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Organophosphate compounds are ubiquitous in the environment and to better understand and predict their environmental transport and fate, well-defined physical-chemical properties are needed. The subcooled liquid-phase vapor pressures at 298.15 K (p298) were determined for 11 chlorinated and nonchlorinated phosphate flame retardants (PFRs) by the capillary gas chromatography retention time method (GC-RT). Values of log (p298/Pa) ranged from −5.22 to −1.32 and enthalpies of vaporization (ΔlgH/kJ·mol–1) ranged from 82.0 to 109. Log (p298/Pa) by GC-RT showed good overall agreement with estimates using the Modified Grain Method (EpiSuite) and with the mean of experimental and in silico literature values, whereas values for the chlorinated PFRs appeared to be overestimated. SPARC modeling seriously underestimated p298, especially for the less volatile compounds. The Junge–Pankow adsorption model at 288.15 K predicted that most of the PFRs would be predominantly in the particulate phase in urban air and distributed between the particulate and gaseous phases in background air.
    Journal of Chemical & Engineering Data 04/2014; 59(5):1441–1447. · 2.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Heterogeneous reactions between OH radicals and emerging flame retardant compounds coated on inert particles have been investigated. Organophosphate esters (OPEs) including tri-phenyl phosphate (TPhP), tris-2-ethylhexyl phosphate (TEHP) and tris-1,3-dichloro-2-propyl phosphate (TDCPP) were coated on (NH4)2SO4 particles and exposed to OH radicals in a photo-chemical flow tube at 298 K and (38.0±2.0) % RH. The degradation of these particle-bound OPEs was observed as a result of OH exposure, as measured using a Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. The derived second-order rate constants (k2) for the heterogeneous loss of TPhP, TEHP and TDCPP were (2.1±0.19)×10-12, (2.7±0.63)×10-12 and (9.2±0.92)×10-13 cm3 molecule-1 s-1, respectively, from which approximate atmospheric lifetimes are estimated to be 5.6 (5.2-6.0), 4.3 (3.5-5.6), and 13 (11-14) days. Additional coating of the OPE coated particles with an OH radical active species further increased the lifetimes of these OPEs. These results represent the first reported estimates of heterogeneous reaction rate constants for these species. The results demonstrate that particle bound OPEs are highly persistent in the atmosphere with regard to OH radical oxidation, consistent with the assumption that OPEs can undergo medium or long-range transport, as previously proposed on the basis of field measurements. Finally, these results indicate that future risk assessment and transport modeling of emerging priority chemicals with semi to low-volatility must consider particle phase heterogeneous loss processes when evaluating environmental persistence.
    Environmental Science & Technology 01/2014; 48:1041-1048. · 5.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Loadings from Toronto, Canada to Lake Ontario were quantified and major sources and pathways were identified, with the goal of informing opportunities for loading reductions. The contaminants were polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers, (PBDEs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polycyclic musks (PCMs). Loadings were calculated from measured concentrations for three major pathways: atmospheric processes, tributary runoff, and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents. Although atmospheric deposition to the Great Lakes has received the greatest attention, this was the dominant loading pathway for PCBs only (17±5.3 kg/y or 66% of total loadings). PCB loadings reflected elevated urban PCB air concentrations due to, predominantly, primary emissions. These loadings contribute to consumption advisories for nearshore fish. PBDE loadings to the lake, again from mainly primary emissions, were 48% (9.1±1.3 kg/y) and 42% (8.0±5.7 kg/y) via tributaries and WWTPs, respectively, consistent with emissions deposited and subsequently washed-off of urban surfaces and emissions to the sewage system. PAHs loadings of 1600±280 kg/y (71%) from tributaries were strongly associated with vehicle transportation and impervious surfaces. PCM loadings were 83% (±140 kg/y) from WWTP final effluent, reflecting their use in personal care products. Opportunities for source reduction lie in reducing the current inventories of in-use PCBs and PBDE-containing products, reducing vehicle emissions of PAHs and use of PAHs in the transportation network (e.g., pavement sealants), and improving waste water treatment technology.
    Environmental Science and Technology 01/2014; · 5.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Archived specimens of the scavenging amphipod Eurythenes gryllus, collected from 2075-4250 m below the surface on five expeditions to the western and central Arctic Ocean between 1983-1998, were analyzed for total mercury (sum-Hg), methyl mercury (MeHg), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other industrial or byproduct organochlorines (chlorobenzenes, pentachloroanisole, octachlorostyrene), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Median sum-Hg concentrations ranged from 70 to 366 ng g-1 wet weight (ww). MeHg concentrations (3.55 to 23.5 ng g-1 ww) accounted for 1.7 to 20.1% (median 3.7%) of sum-Hg. Sum-Hg and MeHg were positively and significantly correlated with ww (sum-Hg r2 = 0.18, p = 0.0004, n=63; MeHg r2 = 0.42, p = 0.0004, n=25), but not significantly with δ13C nor δ15N. Median concentrations of total persistent organic pollutants (POPs) ranged from 9750-156000 ng g-1 lipid weight, with order of abundance: sum-TOX (chlorobornanes quantified as technical toxaphene) > sum-PCBs > sum-DDTs > sum-chlordanes > sum-mirex compounds > sum-PBDEs ~ sum-chlorobenzenes ~ octachlorostyrene > alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane ~ hexachlorobenzene ~ pentachloroanisole. Enantioselective accumulation was found for the chiral OCPs o,p'-DDT, cis- and trans-chlordane, nonachlor MC6 and oxychlordane. Lipid-normalized POPs concentrations were elevated in amphipods with lipid percentages ≤10%, suggesting that utilization of lipids resulted in concentration of POPs in the remaining lipid pool. Multidimensional Scaling (MDS) analysis using log-transformed physiological variables and lipid-normalized organochlorine concentrations distinguished amphipods from the central vs. western arctic stations. This distinction was also seen for PCB homologs, while profiles of other compound classes were more related to specific stations rather than central-west differences.
    Environmental Science & Technology 04/2013; · 5.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Elimination of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) under national and international regulations reduces "primary" emissions, but "secondary" emissions continue from residues deposited in soil, water, ice and vegetation during former years of usage. In a future, secondary source controlled world, POPs will follow the carbon cycle and biogeochemical processes will determine their transport, accumulation and fate. Climate change is likely to affect mobilisation of POPs through e.g., increased temperature, altered precipitation and wind patterns, flooding, loss of ice cover in polar regions, melting glaciers, and changes in soil and water microbiology which affect degradation and transformation. Chiral compounds offer advantages for following transport and fate pathways because of their ability to distinguish racemic (newly released or protected from microbial attack) and nonracemic (microbially degraded) sources. This paper discusses the rationale for this approach and suggests applications where chiral POPs could aid investigation of climate-mediated exchange and degradation processes. Multiyear measurements of two chiral POPs, trans-chlordane and α-HCH, at a Canadian Arctic air monitoring station show enantiomer compositions which cycle seasonally, suggesting varying source contributions which may be under climatic control. Large-scale shifts in the enantioselective metabolism of chiral POPs in soil and water might influence the enantiomer composition of atmospheric residues, and it would be advantageous to include enantiospecific analysis in POPs monitoring programs.
    Mass spectrometry (Tokyo, Japan). 01/2013; 2(Spec Iss):S0019.
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    ABSTRACT: Elimination of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) under national and international controls reduces “primary” emissions, but “secondary” emissions continue from residues deposited in soil, water, ice and vegetation during former years of high usage. Secondary sources are expected to dominate in the future, when POPs transport and accumulation will be controlled by air–surface exchange and the biogeochemical cycle of organic carbon. Climate change is likely to affect mobilization of POPs through, e.g., increased temperature, loss of ice cover in polar regions, melting glaciers and changes in soil and water microbiology which affect degradation and transformation. Chiral compounds offer advantages for following transport and fate pathways because of their ability to distinguish racemic (newly released or protected from microbial attack) and nonracemic (microbially altered) sources. Here we explain the rationale for this approach and suggest applications where chiral POPs could aid investigation of climate–mediated exchange and degradation processes. Examples include distinguishing agricultural vs. non–agricultural and recently used vs. residual pesticides, degradation and sequestration processes in soil, historical vs. recent atmospheric deposition, sources in arctic air and influence of ice cover on volatilization.
    Atmospheric Pollution Research 10/2012; 3(4):371-382. · 1.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The air-sea gas exchange of alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane (α-HCH) in the Canadian Arctic was estimated using a micrometeorological approach and the commonly used Whitman two-film model. Concurrent shipboard measurements of α-HCH in air at two heights (1 and 15 m) and in surface seawater were conducted during the Circumpolar Flaw Lead study in 2008. Sampling was carried out during eight events in the early summer time when open water was encountered. The micrometeorological technique employed the vertical gradient in air concentration and the wind speed to estimate the flux; results were corrected for atmospheric stability using the Monin-Obukhov stability parameter. The Whitman two-film model used the concentrations of α-HCH in surface seawater, in bulk air at 1 and 15 m above the surface, and the Henry's law constant adjusted for temperature and salinity to derive the flux. Both approaches showed that the overall net flux of α-HCH was from water to air. Mean fluxes calculated using the micrometeorological technique ranged from -3.5 to 18 ng m(-2) day(-1) (mean 7.4), compared to 3.5 to 14 ng m(-2) day(-1) (mean 7.5) using the Whitman two-film model. Flux estimates for individual events agreed in direction and within a factor of two in magnitude for six of eight events. For two events, fluxes estimated by micrometeorology were zero or negative, while fluxes estimated with the two-film model were positive, and the reasons for these discrepancies are unclear. Improvements are needed to shorten air sampling times to ensure that stationarity of meteorological conditions is not compromised over the measurement periods. The micrometeorological technique could be particularly useful to estimate fluxes of organic chemicals over water in situations where no water samples are available.
    Environmental Science and Pollution Research 07/2012; 19(6):1908-14. · 2.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Shipboard measurements of organohalogen compounds in air and surface seawater were conducted in the Canadian Arctic in 2007-2008. Study areas included the Labrador Sea, Hudson Bay, and the southern Beaufort Sea. High volume air samples were collected at deck level (6 m), while low volume samples were taken at 1 and 15 m above the water or ice surface. Water samples were taken within 7 m. Water concentration ranges (pg L(-1)) were as follows: α-hexachlorocyclohexane (α-HCH) 465-1013, γ-HCH 150-254, hexachlorobenzene (HCB) 4.0-6.4, 2,4-dibromoanisole (DBA) 8.5-38, and 2,4,6-tribromoanisole (TBA) 4.7-163. Air concentration ranges (pg m(-3)) were as follows: α-HCH 7.5-48, γ-HCH 2.1-7.7, HCB 48-71, DBA 4.8-25, and TBA 6.4 - 39. Fugacity gradients predicted net deposition of HCB in all areas, while exchange directions varied for the other chemicals by season and locations. Net evasion of α-HCH from Hudson Bay and the Beaufort Sea during open water conditions was shown by air concentrations that averaged 14% higher at 1 m than 15 m. No significant difference between the two heights was found over ice cover. The α-HCH in air over the Beaufort Sea was racemic in winter (mean enantiomer fraction, EF = 0.504 ± 0.008) and nonracemic in late spring-early summer (mean EF = 0.476 ± 0.010). This decrease in EF was accompanied by a rise in air concentrations due to volatilization of nonracemic α-HCH from surface water (EF = 0.457 ± 0.019). Fluxes of chemicals during the southern Beaufort Sea open water season (i.e., Leg 9) were estimated using the Whitman two-film model, where volatilization fluxes are positive and deposition fluxes are negative. The means ± SD (and ranges) of net fluxes (ng m(-2) d(-1)) were as follows: α-HCH 6.8 ± 3.2 (2.7-13), γ-HCH 0.76 ± 0.40 (0.26-1.4), HCB -9.6 ± 2.7 (-6.1 to -15), DBA 1.2 ± 0.69 (0.04-2.0), and TBA 0.46 ± 1.1 ng m(-2) d(-1) (-1.6 to 2.0).
    Environmental Science & Technology 02/2011; 45(3):876-81. · 5.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Enantiomeric analysis can be used as a complementary tool for source apportionment of chiral compounds, particularly for alpha-HCH. In this study we used archived samples from studies related to the distribution of POPs in air-water and air-soil-grass systems. Such approach is based on the behaviour of chiral compounds released into the atmosphere from a primary source, when they are expected to show racemic or close to racemic composition. Contrarily, when chiral compounds have been reemitted from secondary sources (e.g. water or soil), their enantiomeric signatures are frequently non-racemic and are similar to the signature of the secondary source. To show such evidence, extracts from passive air samples deployed throughout Europe were analyzed for the enantiomers of alpha-HCH. The proximity to a large water body showed a high impact on the enantiomeric signatures: Baltic air had enantiomeric fractions (EFs) <0.500, while Mediterranean air had predominantly EFs >0.500. Similarly, Atlantic air showed a latitude influence: above 50 degrees N most EFs <0.500, whereas at latitudes below 50 degrees N, EFs were >0.500. A similar trend was also observed for EFs of alpha-HCH measured in air samples from a latitudinal transect during an Atlantic cruise. This transect shows that samples from higher latitudes (above 40 degrees N) have EF <0.500, whereas in the more southern samples (African coast and Southern Atlantic), there is no clear trend for EFs. Inland air samples showed a large range in EF values, with racemic signatures for samples with the highest alpha-HCH concentrations and an increasing spread in the EFs for lower alpha-HCH concentrations. As expected, the EF values of alpha-HCH in air, soils and grass were also impacted by latitude. Correlations between EFs and geographic characteristics of the sampling locations, as well as alpha-HCH concentrations, alpha-/gamma-isomer ratios, or temperature suggest that enantioselective analysis can give additional information on the distribution and sources of alpha-HCH in the environment.
    Environment international 02/2010; 36(4):316-22. · 6.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mecoprop, dichlorprop and metolachlor concentrations and enantiomer signatures were determined in Ontario streams in 2006-2007 and compared to results from 2003 to 2004. Median concentrations of dichlorprop and metolachlor were not significantly different between the two campaigns, but mecoprop was higher in 2006-2007. Concentrations of mecoprop and dichlorprop in Lake Ontario surface water were 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than stream averages. Enantiomer fractions (EFs) > 0.5 of mecoprop in high-concentration stream water samples during 2006-2007 were related to replacement of racemic mecoprop by single (+) enantiomer mecoprop-P after 2004. EFs <0.5 in low-concentration samples suggested enantioselective degradation and/or interconversion. Metolachlor profiles were expressed as SF, the fraction of herbicidally active/(active + inactive) stereoisomers. Samples with higher concentrations of metolachlor had SFs similar to S-metolachlor which is enriched in the active stereoisomers. Low concentrations were associated with lower and more variable SFs, suggesting mixed input of racemic and S-metolachlor or stereoselective degradation.
    Environmental Pollution 12/2009; 158(5):1842-9. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Surface seawater and boundary layer atmospheric samples were collected on the FS Polarstern during cruise ARKXX in the North Atlantic and Arctic Ocean in 2004. Samples were analyzed for persistent organic pollutants (POPs), with a focus on organochlorine pesticides, including hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), chlordanes, DDTs, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In addition, the enantiomer fractions (EFs) of pesticides, notably alpha-HCH and cis-chlordane (CC), were determined. Concentrations of dissolved HCB increased from near Europe (approximately 1-2 pg/L) toward the high Arctic (4-10 pg/L). For dissolved HCB, strongest correlations were obtained with the average air or water temperature during sampling, not latitude. In the western Arctic Ocean, surface waters with elevated concentrations of HCB (5-10 pg/ L) were flowing out of the Arctic Ocean as part of the East Greenland current In contrast to dissolved compounds, atmospheric POPs did not display trends with temperature. Air-water exchange gradients suggested net deposition for all compounds, though HCB was closest to air-water equilibrium. EFs for alpha-HCH in seawater ranged from 0.43 to 0.50, except for two samples from 75 degrees N in the East Greenland Sea, with EFs of 0.31 and 0.37. Lowest EF (0.47) for CC were also at 75 degrees N, other samples had EFs from 0.49 to 0.52. It is suggested that samples from around 75 degrees N in the Greenland Gyre represented a combination of surface and older/deeper Arctic water.
    Environmental Science and Technology 09/2009; 43(15):5633-9. · 5.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The enantiomeric signatures of organochlorine pesticides were measured in air masses from Okinawa, Japan and three remote locations in the Pacific Northwestern United States: Cheeka Peak Observatory (CPO), a marine boundary layer site on the Olympic Peninsula of Washington at 500 m above sea level (m.a.s.l); Mary's Peak Observatory (MPO), a site at 1250 m.a.s.l in Oregon's Coast range; and Mt. Bachelor Observatory (MBO), a site at 2763 m.a.s.l in Oregon's Cascade range. The enantiomeric signatures of composite soil samples, collected from China, South Korea, and the western U.S. were also measured. The data from chiral analysis was expressed asthe enantiomeric fraction, defined as (+) enantiomer/(sum of the (+) and (-) enantiomers), where a racemic composition has EF = 0.5. Racemic alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane (alpha-HCH) was measured in Asian air masses at Okinawa and in Chinese and South Korean soils. Nonracemic alpha-HCH (EF = 0.528 +/- 0.0048) was measured in regional air masses at CPO, and may reflect volatilization from the Pacific Ocean and regional soils. However, during trans-Pacific transport events at CPO, the alpha-HCH EFs were significantly more racemic (EF = 0.513 +/- 0.0003, p < 0.001). Racemic alpha-HCH was consistently measured at MPO and MBO in trans-Pacific air masses that had spent considerable time in the free troposphere. The alpha-HCH EFs in CPO, MPO, and MBO air masses were negatively correlated (p = 0.0017) with the amount of time the air mass spent above the boundary layer, along the 10-day back air mass trajectory, prior to being sampled. This suggests that, on the West coast of the U.S., the alpha-HCH in the free troposphere is racemic. Racemic signatures of cis- and trans-chlordane were measured in air masses at all four air sampling sites, suggesting that Asian and U.S. urban areas continue to be sources of chlordane that has not yet been biotransformed.
    Environmental Science and Technology 05/2009; 43(8):2806-11. · 5.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Air samples were collected in southern Mexico in 2002–2004 to determine the extent of contamination with organochlorine (OC) pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The ΣDDTs ranged from 239 to 2360 pg m−3. Other prominent OC pesticides were endosulfans, toxaphene and lindane. Pesticides detected in lower concentrations include chlordanes, dieldrin, and heptachlor. Proportions of DDT compounds suggested fresh use of DDT in some locations and a mix of fresh and aged residues at others. Ratios of trans-chlordane/cis-chlordane were consistent with fresh chlordane usage or emission of residues from former termiticide applications. The ΣPCBs was relatively low at all sites. Concentrations of OC pesticides measured with passive samplers agreed well with those measured using high-volume samplers. Air back trajectory analysis suggests a complex pattern of regional atmospheric transport.
    Atmospheric Environment 12/2008; · 3.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chiral signatures of organochlorine pesticides were measured in air masses on Okinawa Japan and three remote locations in the Pacific Northwestern U.S.: Cheeka Peak Observatory (CPO), a coastal site on the Olympic Peninsula of Washington at 500 m; Mary's Peak Observatory (MPO), a site at 1250 m in Oregon's Coast range; and Mt. Bachelor Observatory (MBO), a site at 2300 m in Oregon's Cascade range. The chiral signature of composite soil samples collected from agricultural areas in China and South Korea were also measured. Racemic alpha-HCH was measured in Asian air masses and soil from China and South Korea. Non-racemic (enantiomer fraction (EF) = 0.528 ± 0.0048) alpha-HCH was measured in regional air masses at CPO, a marine boundary layer site, and may reflect volatilization from the Pacific Ocean and regional soils. However, during trans-Pacific transport events at CPO, the EFs were significantly (p-value
    AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts. 12/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: Parallel air and water samples were taken on lakes Superior, Huron, Erie and Ontario between 1996 and 2000 to determine the occurrence and levels of hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), trans-chlordane (TC), cis-chlordane (CC), dieldrin (DIEL) and the metabolite heptachlor exo-epoxide (HEPX). Concentrations in the water varied greatly among the lakes, but air concentrations were similar, thus resulting fugacity ratios varied by lake and compound. The enantiomer fraction, EF = (+)/[(+) + (−)], was determined for α-HCH, TC, CC and HEPX. Enantioselective degradation of (+)α-HCH was found in water of all the lakes where the depletion was greatest for Lake Superior, which has the longest water residence time. Preferential loss of (+)TC and enrichment of (+)HEPX were found in lakes Superior and Ontario, with similar EFs in both lakes. CC was racemic in Lake Superior and showed depletion of the (+) enantiomer in Lake Ontario. Depletion of (+)α-HCH, (+)TC and enrichment of (+)HEPX was seen in all air samples. CC varied from depletion of the (+) or (−) enantiomer and was racemic in some cases. Higher concentrations of α-HCH in the air over Lake Superior were correlated with less racemic composition, providing evidence of water-to-air exchange. Fugacity ratios for the HCHs approached equilibrium conditions within a factor of 2, with slight excursions toward net volatilization or deposition, where generally higher excursions were seen for the cyclodienes.
    Atmospheric Environment 11/2008; · 3.06 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
192.34 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • Stockholm University
      • Department of Applied Environmental Science
      Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden
  • 2010
    • University of Antwerp
      Antwerpen, Flanders, Belgium
  • 2009
    • University of Rhode Island
      • Graduate School of Oceanography
      Kingston, RI, United States
  • 2003–2008
    • Environment Canada
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • 1998–2003
    • University of Toronto
      • Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada