Eiji Matsuda

National Cancer Center, Japan, Edo, Tōkyō, Japan

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Publications (6)21.73 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: 1,2-diacylglycerol (1,2-DAG) is involved in cell proliferation as an activator of protein kinase C (PKC) and has been shown to stimulate growth of cancer cells, raising the possibility of a role in tumor promotion. Ingested DAG oil, containing 70% 1,3-DAG and 30% 1,2-DAG, is digested and considered to be safe as edible oil. However, DAG may directly contact with oral cavity mucosa in undigested form. The present study was conducted to examine the effects of DAG oil on carcinogenesis in c-Ha-ras proto-oncogene transgenic (Tg) rats administered 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO, 10 ppm) in their drinking water for 10 weeks for initiation of mainly upper digestive organs. DAG oil added in basal diet at 5.5%, 2.75%, 1.38% and 0% with total fat made up to 5.5% with triacylglycerol (TAG) was administered during the initiation and post-initiation period. The study was terminated at week 12 (Tg females) and 20 (Tg males, wild females and males). The fatty acid composition of DAG oil was similar to TAG (linoleic acid 46.6% and oleic acid 38.9%). In Tg male rats, DAG oil administration was associated with significant increase (P<0.05) in the incidence of squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the tongue (5.5% DAG, 43.8%; 2.75% DAG, 20%; 1.38% DAG, 14.3%; 0%, 12.3%) with the Cochran-Armitage trend test and also number of tumors in coefficients for linear contrast trend tests. Tongue SCC induction of wild males and all females was not significant. The present results suggest that DAG oil may have enhancing and/or promotion potential for tongue carcinogenesis in male Tg featuring elevated ras expression.
    Food and Chemical Toxicology 06/2007; 45(6):1013-9. · 3.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bovine lactoferrin, a multifunctional glycoprotein, has been shown to strongly inhibit development of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced rat colon tumors. Little, however, is known about the inhibitory mechanisms. We have demonstrated recently that lactoferrin enhances the expression of a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family, Fas, in the colon mucosa during both early and late stages of carcinogenesis. Thus, Fas could be involved in bovine lactoferrin-mediated inhibition of tumor development. To investigate this possibility, we studied the influence of bovine lactoferrin on Fas-mediated apoptosis with regard to expression of Fas, activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3, and DNA fragmentation in the colon mucosa of AOM-treated rats. Western blot analysis demonstrated a >2.5-fold increase in Fas protein expression, as well as elevation of the active forms of both caspase-8 and caspase-3. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed Fas-positive cells and apoptotic cells preferentially within the proximal colon region, clearly at the site of bovine lactoferrin-mediated tumor inhibition. These results suggest that apoptosis caused by elevated expression of Fas is involved in chemoprevention by lactoferrin of colon carcinogenesis.
    Carcinogenesis 11/2004; 25(10):1961-6. · 5.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lactoferrin, an iron-binding glycoprotein, exhibits suppressive effects on development of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced tumors in the rat colon, but the mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of lactoferrin on the gene expression of 10 apoptosis-related molecules in colon mucosa of AOM-treated rats during early and late stages of colon carcinogenesis by reverse transcription PCR. Here we document that a death-inducing receptor, Fas, and a pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member, Bid, are increased in the colon mucosa in proportion to decreases in AOM-induced aberrant crypt foci by lactoferrin. Similarly, increased expression of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member, Bax, was also observed in AOM-induced tumors in rats fed by lactoferrin. These results indicate that Fas and pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 members participate in the lactoferrin action and may contribute to suppressive effects on tumor development in the rat colon.
    Cancer Letters 10/2004; 213(1):21-9. · 5.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Increasing attention is being paid to the possibility of applying cancer chemopreventive agents for individuals at high risk of neoplastic development. For this purpose by natural compounds have practical advantages with regard to availability, suitability for oral application, regulatory approval and mechanisms of action. Candidate substances such as phytochemicals present in foods and their derivatives have been identified by a combination of epidemiological and experimental studies. Plant constituents include vitamin derivatives, phenolic and flavonoid agents, organic sulfur compounds, isothiocyanates, curcumins, fatty acids and d-limonene. Examples of compounds from animals are unsaturated fatty acids and lactoferrin. Recent studies have indicated that mechanisms underlying chemopreventive potential may be combinations of anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, immune-enhancing, and anti-hormone effects, with modification of drug-metabolizing enzymes, influence on the cell cycle and cell differentiation, induction of apoptosis and suppression of proliferation and angiogenesis playing roles in the initiation and secondary modification stages of neoplastic development. Accordingly, natural agents are advantageous for application to humans because of their combined mild mechanism. Here we review naturally occurring compounds useful for cancer chemprevention based on in vivo studies with reference to their structures, sources and mechanisms of action.
    Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics 09/2004; 19(4):245-63. · 2.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our transgenic (Tg) strain carrying copies of the human c-Ha-ras proto-oncogene is highly susceptible to 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced mammary carcinogenesis, possibly due to activation of the transgene, and can be used in medium-term bioassay models to test for modifying effects of estrogenic environmental compounds on tumor development. The present study was conducted to assess the influence of dietary feeding of the endocrine disruptors atrazine and nonylphenol on DMBA-induced carcinogenesis in c-Ha-ras Tg rats. Animals of both sexes were given a single oral dose of DMBA (25 mg/kg body weight) at 50 days of age and thereafter received soybean-free diet containing 5, 50 or 500 ppm atrazine, or 10, 25, 100 or 250 ppm nonylphenol. In female Tg rats, atrazine at a dose of 5 ppm increased the incidences of mammary adenomas and adenocarcinomas (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05), while 50 ppm increased the adenocarcinoma incidence (P < 0.05). In males, skin tumor development, in contrast, was significantly decreased at the highest dose. Nonylphenol at 10 ppm increased adenocarcinoma and total mammary tumor multiplicity in female Tg rats (P < 0.05), but there was no dose dependence, a significant quadratic dose-response trend rather being observed (P < 0.05). In vitro, atrazine did not cause proliferation of MCF-7 cells at any of a range of doses tested. These results suggest that endocrine disruptors may enhance mammary carcinogenesis, but only in a certain limited dose range under the present experimental conditions. The doses applied, moreover, were all extremely high compared to the possible environmental human exposure levels.
    Cancer Science 06/2004; 95(5):404-10. · 3.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have previously demonstrated that oral administration of bovine lactoferrin (bLF) markedly inhibits lung metastatic colony formation, and that this inhibition was possibly due to the activation of T and NK cells. Furthermore, we found that interleukin-18 (IL-18) is induced in epithelial cells of the small intestine by bLF. The present study was undertaken to confirm cytokine production in response to bLF and to assess the underlying mechanisms. Markedly elevated IL-18 levels were found in the small intestine 1-3 h after a single administration of bLF, its pepsin hydrolysate (bLFH), or bTF. Importantly, while IL-18 was significantly increased after a regimen of seven daily administrations of bLF or bLFH, administration of bTF over the course of seven days had little or no effect. In addition to IL-18, a significant increase in caspase-1 activity and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was found in the small intestine after administration of bLF. Similarly, in peritoneal macrophages, bLF markedly enhanced caspase-1 activity and IL-18 levels. Finally, a caspase-1 inhibitor significantly decreased bLF mediated induction of IL-18 in vitro. (bTF had no effect on either caspase-1 or IFN-gamma or on IL-18 in vitro.) These results demonstrate the possibility that elevation of caspase-1 activity by bLF and its hydrolysate may be important for production of mature IL-18 in vivo, and thus in potentiating the killing activity of T and NK cells against tumor cells.
    Cytokine 02/2004; 25(1):36-44. · 2.52 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

148 Citations
21.73 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2004
    • National Cancer Center, Japan
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
    • Tokyo University of Science
      • Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan