Gonçalo A G Pereira

São Paulo State University, San Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

Are you Gonçalo A G Pereira?

Claim your profile

Publications (77)218.1 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: High-throughput screening of physical, genetic and chemical-genetic interactions brings important perspectives in the Systems Biology field, as the analysis of these interactions provides new insights into protein/gene function, cellular metabolic variations and the validation of therapeutic targets and drug design. However, such analysis depends on a pipeline connecting different tools that can automatically integrate data from diverse sources and result in a more comprehensive dataset that can be properly interpreted.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(6):e100385. · 3.73 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Dataset: Paper3
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: One of the defining features of the fermentation process used in the production of bioethanol from sugarcane feedstock is the dynamic nature of the yeast population. Minisatellite molecular markers are particularly useful for monitoring yeast communities because they produce polymorphic PCR products that typically display wide size variations. We compared the coding sequences derived from the genome of the sugarcane bioethanol strain JAY270/PE-2 to those of the reference Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strain S288c, and searched for genes containing insertion or deletion polymorphisms larger than 24bp. We then designed oligonucleotide primers flanking nine of these sites, and used them to amplify differentially sized PCR products. We analyzed the banding patterns in the most widely adopted sugarcane bioethanol strains and in several indigenous yeast contaminants, and found that our marker set had very good discriminatory power. Subsequently, these markers were used to successfully monitor the yeast cell populations in six sugarcane bioethanol distilleries. Additionally, we showed that most of the markers described here are also polymorphic among strains unrelated to bioethanol production, suggesting that they may be applied universally in S. cerevisiae. Because the relatively large polymorphisms are detectable in conventional agarose gels, our method is well suited to modestly equipped on-site laboratories at bioethanol distilleries, therefore providing both cost and time savings.
    Journal of Biotechnology 08/2013; · 3.18 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Termites can degrade up to 90% of the lignocellulose they ingest using a repertoire of endogenous and symbiotic degrading enzymes. Termites have been shown to secrete two main glycoside hydrolases, which are GH1 (EC 3.2.1.21) and GH9 (EC 3.2.1.4) members. However, the molecular mechanism for lignocellulose degradation by these enzymes remains poorly understood. The present study was conducted to understand the synergistic relationship between GH9 (CgEG1) and GH1 (CgBG1) from Coptotermes gestroi, which is considered the major urban pest of São Paulo State in Brazil. The goal of this work was to decipher the mode of operation of CgEG1 and CgBG1 through a comprehensive biochemical analysis and molecular docking studies. There was outstanding degree of synergy in degrading glucose polymers for the production of glucose as a result of the endo-β-1,4-glucosidase and exo-β-1,4-glucosidase degradation capability of CgEG1 in concert with the high catalytic performance of CgBG1, which rapidly converts the oligomers into glucose. Our data not only provide an increased comprehension regarding the synergistic mechanism of these two enzymes for cellulose saccharification but also give insight about the role of these two enzymes in termite biology, which can provide the foundation for the development of a number of important applied research topics, such as the control of termites as pests as well as the development of technologies for lignocellulose-to-bioproduct applications.
    Insect biochemistry and molecular biology 08/2013; · 3.25 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cerato-platanins (CP) are small cysteine-rich fungal-secreted proteins involved in the various stages of the host-fungus interaction process, acting as phytotoxins, elicitors and allergens. We identified 12 CP genes (MpCP1 to 12) in Moniliophthora perniciosa's genome, the causal agent of Witches' Broom disease in cacao, and showed that they present distinct expression profiles throughout fungal development and infection. We determined the X-ray crystal structures of MpCP1, 2, 3 and 5, representative of different branches of a phylogenetic tree and expressed at different stages of the disease. Structure-based biochemistry, in combination with nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry allowed us to define specialized capabilities regarding self-assembling and the direct binding to chitin and N-acetylglucosamine tetramers (NAG), a fungal cell wall building block, and to map a previously unknown binding region in MpCP5. Moreover, fibers of MpCP2 were shown to act as expansin and facilitate basidiospore germination while soluble MpCP5 blocked NAG-induced defense response. The correlation between these roles, the fungus life cycle and its tug-of-war interaction with cacao plants is discussed.
    Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions 07/2013; · 4.31 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present the sequencing and annotation of the Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis genome, an etiological agent of human cutaneous leishmaniasis in the Amazon region of Brazil. L. (L.) amazonensis shares features with Leishmania (L.) mexicana but also exhibits unique characteristics regarding geographical distribution and clinical manifestations of cutaneous lesions (e.g. borderline disseminated cutaneous leishmaniasis). Predicted genes were scored for orthologous gene families and conserved domains in comparison with other human pathogenic Leishmania spp. Carboxypeptidase, aminotransferase, and 3'-nucleotidase genes and ATPase, thioredoxin, and chaperone-related domains were represented more abundantly in L. (L.) amazonensis and L. (L.) mexicana species. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these two species share groups of amastin surface proteins unique to the genus that could be related to specific features of disease outcomes and host cell interactions. Additionally, we describe a hypothetical hybrid interactome of potentially secreted L. (L.) amazonensis proteins and host proteins under the assumption that parasite factors mimic their mammalian counterparts. The model predicts an interaction between an L. (L.) amazonensis heat-shock protein and mammalian Toll-like receptor 9, which is implicated in important immune responses such as cytokine and nitric oxide production. The analysis presented here represents valuable information for future studies of leishmaniasis pathogenicity and treatment.
    DNA Research 07/2013; · 4.43 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Members of the pathogenesis-related protein 1 (PR-1) family are well-known markers of plant defence responses, forming part of the arsenal of the secreted proteins produced on pathogen recognition. Here, we report the identification of two cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) PR-1s that are fused to transmembrane regions and serine/threonine kinase domains, in a manner characteristic of receptor-like kinases (RLKs). These proteins (TcPR-1f and TcPR-1g) were named PR-1 receptor kinases (PR-1RKs). Phylogenetic analysis of RLKs and PR-1 proteins from cacao indicated that PR-1RKs originated from a fusion between sequences encoding PR-1 and the kinase domain of a LecRLK (Lectin Receptor-Like Kinase). Retrotransposition marks surround TcPR-1f, suggesting that retrotransposition was involved in the origin of PR-1RKs. Genes with a similar domain architecture to cacao PR-1RKs were found in rice (Oryza sativa), barrel medic (Medicago truncatula) and a nonphototrophic bacterium (Herpetosiphon aurantiacus). However, their kinase domains differed from those found in LecRLKs, indicating the occurrence of convergent evolution. TcPR-1g expression was up-regulated in the biotrophic stage of witches' broom disease, suggesting a role for PR-1RKs during cacao defence responses. We hypothesize that PR-1RKs transduce a defence signal by interacting with a PR-1 ligand.
    Molecular Plant Pathology 04/2013; · 3.88 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Members of the pathogenesis-related protein 1 (PR-1) family are well-known markers of plant defence responses, forming part of the arsenal of the secreted proteins produced on pathogen recognition. Here, we report the identification of two cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) PR-1s that are fused to transmembrane regions and serine/threonine kinase domains, in a manner characteristic of receptor-like kinases (RLKs). These proteins (TcPR-1f and TcPR-1g) were named PR-1 receptor kinases (PR-1RKs). Phylogenetic analysis of RLKs and PR-1 proteins from cacao indicated that PR-1RKs originated from a fusion between sequences encoding PR-1 and the kinase domain of a LecRLK (Lectin Receptor-Like Kinase). Retrotransposition marks surround TcPR-1f, suggesting that retrotransposition was involved in the origin of PR-1RKs. Genes with a similar domain architecture to cacao PR-1RKs were found in rice (Oryza sativa), barrel medic (Medicago truncatula) and a nonphototrophic bacterium (Herpetosiphon aurantiacus). However, their kinase domains differed from those found in LecRLKs, indicating the occurrence of convergent evolution. TcPR-1g expression was up-regulated in the biotrophic stage of witches’ broom disease, suggesting a role for PR-1RKs during cacao defence responses.We hypothesize that PR-1RKs transduce a defence signal by interacting with a PR-1 ligand.
    Molecular Plant Pathology 04/2013; · 3.88 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Eucalyptus is one of the most important sources of industrial cellulose. Three species of this botanical group are intensively used in breeding programs: E. globulus, E. grandis and E. urophylla. E. globulus is adapted to subtropical/temperate areas and is considered a source of high-quality cellulose; E. grandis grows rapidly and is adapted to tropical/subtropical climates; and E. urophylla, though less productive, is considered a source of genes related to robustness. Wood, or secondary xylem, results from cambium vascular differentiation and is mostly composed of cellulose, lignin and hemicelluloses. In this study, the xylem transcriptomes of the three Eucalyptus species were investigated in order to provide insights on the particularities presented by each of these species. Results Data analysis showed that (1) most Eucalyptus genes are expressed in xylem; (2) most genes expressed in species-specific way constitutes genes with unknown functions and are interesting targets for future studies; (3) relevant differences were observed in the phenylpropanoid pathway: E. grandis xylem presents higher expression of genes involved in lignin formation whereas E. urophylla seems to deviates the pathway towards flavonoid formation; (4) stress-related genes are considerably more expressed in E. urophylla, suggesting that these genes may contribute to its robustness. Conclusions The comparison of these three transcriptomes indicates the molecular signatures underlying some of their distinct wood characteristics. This information may contribute to the understanding of xylogenesis, thus increasing the potential of genetic engineering approaches aiming at the improvement of Eucalyptus forest plantations productivity.
    BMC Genomics 03/2013; 14. · 4.40 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Eucalyptus is one of the most important sources of industrial cellulose. Three species of this botanical group are intensively used in breeding programs: E. globulus, E. grandis and E. urophylla. E. globulus is adapted to subtropical/temperate areas and is considered a source of high-quality cellulose; E. grandis grows rapidly and is adapted to tropical/subtropical climates; and E. urophylla, though less productive, is considered a source of genes related to robustness. Wood, or secondary xylem, results from cambium vascular differentiation and is mostly composed of cellulose, lignin and hemicelluloses. In this study, the xylem transcriptomes of the three Eucalyptus species were investigated in order to provide insights on the particularities presented by each of these species. RESULTS: Data analysis showed that (1) most Eucalyptus genes are expressed in xylem; (2) most genes expressed in species-specific way constitutes genes with unknown functions and are interesting targets for future studies; (3) relevant differences were observed in the phenylpropanoid pathway: E. grandis xylem presents higher expression of genes involved in lignin formation whereas E. urophylla seems to deviates the pathway towards flavonoid formation; (4) stress-related genes are considerably more expressed in E. urophylla, suggesting that these genes may contribute to its robustness. CONCLUSIONS: The comparison of these three transcriptomes indicates the molecular signatures underlying some of their distinct wood characteristics. This information may contribute to the understanding of xylogenesis, thus increasing the potential of genetic engineering approaches aiming at the improvement of Eucalyptus forest plantations productivity.
    BMC Genomics 03/2013; 14(1):201. · 4.40 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Eucalyptus genus plays an important role in the worldwide forest industry, with highly productive plantations supplying high-quality raw material for pulp and paper, wood, and biomass that would otherwise come from native forests. Lignin and extractives are important components for wood structure and protection but they are disruptive elements with respect to some industrial processes involving paper, pulp, and biomass production. This work evaluated effects of supplementation of flavonoids on the wood composition of Eucalyptus grandis x Eucalyptus urophylla (E. urograndis), a commercial hybrid. The wood samples were analyzed for extractives and lignin contents by wet chemical analysis, and the composition of lignin monomers and the carbohydrate hexosan/pentosan ratio were determined by analytical pyrolysis. The results showed that supplementation with the flavonoids naringenin and naringenin-chalcone led to an overall reduction of the extractive content and altered the monomeric composition of lignins towards a higher syringyl content. Thus, the treatment of Eucalyptus with flavonoids results in the improvement of wood quality for technological purposes.
    Bioresources 02/2013; 8(2):174701757. · 1.31 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The ascomycete fungus Ceratocystis cacaofunesta is the causal agent of wilt disease in cacao, which results in significant economic losses in the affected producing areas. Despite the economic importance of the Ceratocystis complex of species, no genomic data are available for any of its members. Given that mitochondria play important roles in fungal virulence and the susceptibility/resistance of fungi to fungicides, we performed the first functional analysis of this organelle in Ceratocystis using integrated "omics" approaches. RESULTS: The C. cacaofunesta mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) consists of a single, 103,147-bp circular molecule, making this the second largest mtDNA among the Sordariomycetes. Bioinformatics analysis revealed the presence of 15 conserved genes and 37 intronic open read frames in C. cacaofunesta mtDNA. Here, we predicted the mitochondrial proteome (mtProt) of C. cacaofunesta, which is comprised of 1,124 polypeptides - 52 proteins that are mitochondrially encoded and 1,072 that are nuclearly encoded. Transcriptome analysis revealed 33 probable novel genes. Comparisons among the Gene Ontology results of the predicted mtProt of C. cacaofunesta, Neurospora crassa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed no significant differences. Moreover, C. cacaofunesta mitochondria were isolated, and the mtProt was subjected to mass spectrometric analysis. The experimental proteome validated 27% of the predicted mtProt. Our results confirmed the existence of 110 hypothetical proteins and 7 novel proteins of which 83 and 1, respectively, had putative mitochondrial localization. CONCLUSIONS: The present study provides the first partial genomic analysis of a species of the Ceratocystis complex and the first predicted mitochondrial protein inventory of a phytopathogenic fungus. In addition to the known mitochondrial role in pathogenicity, our results demonstrated that the global function analysis of this organelle is similar in pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi, suggesting that its relevance in the lifestyle of these organisms should be based on a small number of specific proteins and/or with respect to differential gene regulation. In this regard, particular interest should be directed towards mitochondrial proteins with unknown function and the novel protein that might be specific to this species. Further functional characterization of these proteins could enhance our understanding of the role of mitochondria in phytopathogenicity.
    BMC Genomics 02/2013; 14(1):91. · 4.40 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Recently, a new Arabidopsis thaliana master regulator of plant cell wall biosynthesis was characterized. It was named SHINE transcription factor (SHINE TF). This work searched for homologous genes in Eucalyptus grandis genome draft. RNAseq data, phylogeny analysis and qRT-PCR experiments were performed to complement SHINE gene analysis. By similarity searches using A. thaliana SHINE genes, four sequences were identified in Eucalyptus. Two of them contain all conserved motifs and characteristic features of this family, being assumed as true SHINE TFs and named EgrSHN1 and EgrSHN2. The other two sequences contain an incomplete ‘mm’ motif and were not considered true SHINE TFs, being further referred as Egr33m and Egr40m. Expression analysis revealed that EgrSHN1 is more expressed in flowers than in leaves and immature xylem, and both EgrSHN1 and EgrSHN2 are absent from adult xylem RNAseq libraries. This expression profile is similar to A. thaliana orthologues. On the other hand, Egr33m and Egr40m expression was detected in adult xylems. The phylogenetic studies indicate that both EgrSHNs were originated by gene duplication events which, together with gene loss, are hypothesized as common events in SHINE evolution. In conclusion, it is possible that the overexpression of SHINE genes in Eucalyptus xylem can generate information about wood formation processes, allowing an effective increase in forest plantation productivity.
    Plant Growth Regulation 01/2013; 69(2). · 1.67 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) infections are responsible for significant losses in the poultry industry worldwide. The disease might present as different local infections or as septicemia. Here, we present the draft genome sequences of three Brazilian APEC strains isolated from different kinds of infections. The availability of these APEC genome sequences is important for gaining a thorough understanding of the genomic features of E. coli, particularly those of this pathotype.
    Genome announcements. 01/2013; 1(2):e0011013.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Plant genomes are massively invaded by transposable elements (TEs), many of which are located near host genes and can thus impact gene expression. In flowering plants, TE expression can be activated (de-repressed) under certain stressful conditions, both biotic and abiotic, as well as by genome stress caused by hybridization. In this study, we examined the effects of these stress agents on TE expression in two diploid species of coffee, Coffea canephora and C. eugenioides, and their allotetraploid hybrid C. arabica. We also explored the relationship of TE repression mechanisms to host gene regulation via the effects of exonized TE sequences. Similar to what has been seen for other plants, overall TE expression levels are low in Coffea plant cultivars, consistent with the existence of effective TE repression mechanisms. TE expression patterns are highly dynamic across the species and conditions assayed here are unrelated to their classification at the level of TE class or family. In contrast to previous results, cell culture conditions per se do not lead to the de-repression of TE expression in C. arabica. Results obtained here indicate that differing plant drought stress levels relate strongly to TE repression mechanisms. TEs tend to be expressed at significantly higher levels in non-irrigated samples for the drought tolerant cultivars but in drought sensitive cultivars the opposite pattern was shown with irrigated samples showing significantly higher TE expression. Thus, TE genome repression mechanisms may be finely tuned to the ideal growth and/or regulatory conditions of the specific plant cultivars in which they are active. Analysis of TE expression levels in cell culture conditions underscored the importance of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathways in the repression of Coffea TEs. These same NMD mechanisms can also regulate plant host gene expression via the repression of genes that bear exonized TE sequences.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(11):e78931. · 3.73 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The yeast Dekkera bruxellensis has been recently regarded as an important microorganism for bioethanol production owing to its ability to convert glucose, sucrose, and cellobiose to ethanol. The aim of this work was to validate a new set of reference genes for gene expression analysis by quantitative real-time PCR in D. bruxellensis and compare the influence of the method of choice for quantification of mRNA levels with the reliability of our data. Three candidate reference genes, DbEFA1, DbEFB1, and DbYNA1, were used in a quantitative analysis of 4 genes of interest, DbYNR1, DbTPS1, DbADH7, and DbUBA4, based on an approach for calculating the normalization factors by means of the geNorm applet. Each reference gene was also individually used for a [Formula: see text] (comparative C(q) method) calculation of the relative expression of genes of interest. Our results showed that the 3 reference genes provided enough stability and were complementary to the normalization factors method in different culture conditions. This work was able to confirm the usefulness of a previously reported reference gene, EFA1/TEF1, and increased the set of possible reference genes in D. bruxellensis to 4. Moreover, this can improve the reliability of the analysis of the regulation of gene expression in the industrial yeast D. bruxellensis.
    Canadian Journal of Microbiology 12/2012; 58(12):1362-7. · 1.20 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the production of cellulolytic enzymes by Acremonium strictum isolated from Brazilian Biome using different substrates. Fermentations were initially carried out using commercial substrates, including microcrystalline cellulose (AVICEL® and SERVACEL®) and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). This was followed by fermentations performed using lignocellulosic biomass: sugarcane bagasse pretreated at different intensities. The fermentations were carried out in shakers at 150rpm, 30°C for 240h. Four enzyme activities were determined: CMCase, FPase, cellobiase and β-glucosidase. Among the substrates used, results showed that the sugarcane bagasse submitted to mild pretreatment was that which induced the microorganism to produce greater cellulolytic activities. This substrate was employed in the optimization study of cellulase production by A. strictum.
    Bioresource Technology 10/2012; · 4.75 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Boto, a Class II transposable element, was characterized in the Moniliophthora perniciosa genome. The Boto transposase is highly similar to plant PIF-like transposases that belong to the newest Class II superfamily known as PIF/Harbinger. Although Boto shares characteristics with PIF-like elements, other characteristics, such as the transposase intron position, the position and direction of the second ORF, and the footprint indicate that Boto belongs to a new family of the PIF/Harbinger superfamily. Southern analyses detected 6 to 12 copies of Boto in C-biotype isolates and a ubiquitous presence among the C- and S-biotypes, as well as a separation in the C-biotype isolates from Bahia State in Brazil in at least two genotypic groups, and a new insertion in the genome of a C-biotype isolate maintained in the laboratory for 6 years. In addition to PCR amplification from a specific insertion site, changes in the Boto hybridization profile after the M. perniciosa sexual cycle and detection of Boto transcripts gave further evidence of Boto activity. As an active family in the genome of M. perniciosa, Boto elements may contribute to genetic variability in this homothallic fungus. This is the first report of a PIF/Harbinger transposon in the genome of a phytopathogenic fungus.
    Microbiology 10/2012; · 3.06 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Lepikson-Neto, Gonçalo amarante Pereira
    Ref. No: BR1020120269813, Year: 10/2012
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The hemibiotrophic basidiomycete fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa, the causal agent of Witches' broom disease (WBD) in cacao, is able to grow on methanol as the sole carbon source. In plants, one of the main sources of methanol is the pectin present in the structure of cell walls. Pectin is composed of highly methylesterified chains of galacturonic acid. The hydrolysis between the methyl radicals and galacturonic acid in esterified pectin, mediated by a pectin methylesterase (PME), releases methanol, which may be decomposed by a methanol oxidase (MOX). The analysis of the M. pernciosa genome revealed putative mox and pme genes. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR performed with RNA from mycelia grown in the presence of methanol or pectin as the sole carbon source and with RNA from infected cacao seedlings in different stages of the progression of WBD indicate that the two genes are coregulated, suggesting that the fungus may be metabolizing the methanol released from pectin. Moreover, immunolocalization of homogalacturonan, the main pectic domain that constitutes the primary cell wall matrix, shows a reduction in the level of pectin methyl esterification in infected cacao seedlings. Although MOX has been classically classified as a peroxisomal enzyme, M. perniciosa presents an extracellular methanol oxidase. Its activity was detected in the fungus culture supernatants, and mass spectrometry analysis indicated the presence of this enzyme in the fungus secretome. Because M. pernciosa possesses all genes classically related to methanol metabolism, we propose a peroxisome-independent model for the utilization of methanol by this fungus, which begins with the extracellular oxidation of methanol derived from the demethylation of pectin and finishes in the cytosol.
    Fungal Genetics and Biology 09/2012; · 3.26 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

626 Citations
218.10 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2013
    • São Paulo State University
      • • Department of Pathology
      • • Departamento de Biologia (Rio Claro)
      San Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
    • Duke University Medical Center
      • Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology
      Durham, NC, United States
    • Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz
      • Departamento de Ciências Biológicas (DCB)
      Ilhéus, Estado da Bahia, Brazil
    • Universidade Federal de Viçosa (UFV)
      • Departamento de Microbiologia
      Viçosa, Estado de Minas Gerais, Brazil
  • 2007–2012
    • University of Campinas
      • • Departamento de Genética Médica
      • • Departamento de Genética e Evolução e Bioagentes
      Campinas, Estado de Sao Paulo, Brazil