E A Haan

University of Adelaide, Tarndarnya, South Australia, Australia

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Publications (133)907.15 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: AKT3 (v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 3) is located at chromosome 1q44 and encodes a 479 amino acid protein, a member of the protein kinase B (PKB) family. This gene is frequently involved in 1q44 deletion syndrome in patients with microcephaly, intellectual disability, and dysmorphic features. Phenotype and genotype studies of patients with 1q44 deletion syndrome have suggested that deletion of the AKT3 gene is responsible for the microcephaly in these patients. However, the phenotype of pure AKT3 deletion has not been studied.We report on a 1q44 deletion involving only AKT3 in a boy and his father. The boy has microcephaly, hypotonia, feeding difficulties, developmental delay, and minor dysmorphic features. His father does not have microcephaly and is of normal intelligence. We also analyzed the available information on the phenotypes of 13 individuals carrying a pure AKT3 gene deletion identified through literature review and database search. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a paternally inherited pure AKT3 deletion with full clinical description. This is also the first report to suggest that (1) AKT3 deletion is associated with microcephaly and intellectual disability with incomplete penetrance; (2) a pure AKT3 deletion is likely to be inherited in contrast to the larger 1q44 deletions, which are mostly de novo and (3) there seems to be no consistent or characteristic dysmorphism associated with pure AKT3 deletion. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A 11/2014; · 2.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: CNVs collectively have an appreciable impact on human mental health, but their large size often precludes specifying the underlying genes involved in the disorder. The pathogenicity of many CNVs observed in the clinic is unknown because the typical variant is also extremely rare, requiring large surveys to achieve significance in case-control cohorts 1–4 . Large-scale analyses of clinical microarray data from children with developmental delay, intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are now possible and have been used to catalog regions of human dosage imbalance. In most cases, multiple candidate genes still underlie the smallest region of overlap. In contrast, exome sequencing studies of parent-child trios provide the necessary specificity to discover de novo truncating mutations—that is, nonsense and frameshift indel mutations—with gene-level specificity 5–14 . Because of the extreme locus heteroge-neity of such diseases, however, relatively few recurrences have been reported, as surveys of tens of thousands of exomes are still prohibitively expensive. As large-scale deletions and truncating mutations result in the same dosage imbalance for critical genes, we reasoned that systematically integrating both classes of muta-tion would improve power in discovering genes associated with developmental delay. Here we have constructed one of the larg-est CNV morbidity maps of individuals with intellectual disability, developmental delay and/or ASD, both as a clinical resource for pathogenic CNVs and also to identify genes potentially sensitive to dosage imbalance. We then integrated these data with published exome sequencing data and used next-generation sequencing methods to rapidly resequence candidate genes in individuals with unexplained developmental delay. Using this approach, we identified pathogenic mutations in new genes with both statistical significance and clinical relevance. Refining analyses of copy number variation identifies specific genes associated with developmental delay
    Nature Genetics 09/2014; · 29.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a complex disorder characterised by a broad range of clinical manifestations, differential pathological signatures, and genetic variability. Mutations in three genes-MAPT, GRN, and C9orf72-have been associated with FTD. We sought to identify novel genetic risk loci associated with the disorder. METHODS: We did a two-stage genome-wide association study on clinical FTD, analysing samples from 3526 patients with FTD and 9402 healthy controls. To reduce genetic heterogeneity, all participants were of European ancestry. In the discovery phase (samples from 2154 patients with FTD and 4308 controls), we did separate association analyses for each FTD subtype (behavioural variant FTD, semantic dementia, progressive non-fluent aphasia, and FTD overlapping with motor neuron disease [FTD-MND]), followed by a meta-analysis of the entire dataset. We carried forward replication of the novel suggestive loci in an independent sample series (samples from 1372 patients and 5094 controls) and then did joint phase and brain expression and methylation quantitative trait loci analyses for the associated (p<5 × 10(-8)) single-nucleotide polymorphisms. FINDINGS: We identified novel associations exceeding the genome-wide significance threshold (p<5 × 10(-8)). Combined (joint) analyses of discovery and replication phases showed genome-wide significant association at 6p21.3, HLA locus (immune system), for rs9268877 (p=1·05 × 10(-8); odds ratio=1·204 [95% CI 1·11-1·30]), rs9268856 (p=5·51 × 10(-9); 0·809 [0·76-0·86]) and rs1980493 (p value=1·57 × 10(-8), 0·775 [0·69-0·86]) in the entire cohort. We also identified a potential novel locus at 11q14, encompassing RAB38/CTSC (the transcripts of which are related to lysosomal biology), for the behavioural FTD subtype for which joint analyses showed suggestive association for rs302668 (p=2·44 × 10(-7); 0·814 [0·71-0·92]). Analysis of expression and methylation quantitative trait loci data suggested that these loci might affect expression and methylation in cis. INTERPRETATION: Our findings suggest that immune system processes (link to 6p21.3) and possibly lysosomal and autophagy pathways (link to 11q14) are potentially involved in FTD. Our findings need to be replicated to better define the association of the newly identified loci with disease and to shed light on the pathomechanisms contributing to FTD
    The Lancet Neurology 07/2014; 3(7):686-99. · 21.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Folate-sensitive fragile sites (FSFS) are a rare cytogenetically visible subset of dynamic mutations. Of the eight molecularly characterized FSFS, four are associated with intellectual disability (ID). Cytogenetic expression results from CGG tri-nucleotide-repeat expansion mutation associated with local CpG hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing. The best studied is the FRAXA site in the FMR1 gene, where large expansions cause fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited ID syndrome. Here we studied three families with FRA2A expression at 2q11 associated with a wide spectrum of neurodevelopmental phenotypes. We identified a polymorphic CGG repeat in a conserved, brain-active alternative promoter of the AFF3 gene, an autosomal homolog of the X-linked AFF2/FMR2 gene: Expansion of the AFF2 CGG repeat causes FRAXE ID. We found that FRA2A-expressing individuals have mosaic expansions of the AFF3 CGG repeat in the range of several hundred repeat units. Moreover, bisulfite sequencing and pyrosequencing both suggest AFF3 promoter hypermethylation. cSNP-analysis demonstrates monoallelic expression of the AFF3 gene in FRA2A carriers thus predicting that FRA2A expression results in functional haploinsufficiency for AFF3 at least in a subset of tissues. By whole-mount in situ hybridization the mouse AFF3 ortholog shows strong regional expression in the developing brain, somites and limb buds in 9.5-12.5dpc mouse embryos. Our data suggest that there may be an association between FRA2A and a delay in the acquisition of motor and language skills in the families studied here. However, additional cases are required to firmly establish a causal relationship.
    PLoS Genetics 04/2014; 10(4):e1004242. · 8.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: With a wealth of disease-associated DNA variants being recently reported, the challenges of providing their functional characterization are mounting. Previously, as part of a large systematic resequencing of the X chromosome in 208 unrelated families with nonsyndromic X-linked intellectual disability, we identified three unique variants (two missense and one protein truncating) in USP9X. To assess the functional significance of these variants, we took advantage of the Usp9x knockout mouse we generated. Loss of Usp9x causes reduction in both axonal growth and neuronal cell migration. Although overexpression of wild-type human USP9X rescued these defects, all three USP9X variants failed to rescue axonal growth, caused reduced USP9X protein localization in axonal growth cones, and (in 2/3 variants) failed to rescue neuronal cell migration. Interestingly, in one of these families, the proband was subsequently identified to have a microdeletion encompassing ARID1B, a known ID gene. Given our findings it is plausible that loss of function of both genes contributes to the individual's phenotype. This case highlights the complexity of the interpretations of genetic findings from genome-wide investigations. We also performed proteomics analysis of neurons from both the wild-type and Usp9x knockout embryos and identified disruption of the cytoskeleton as the main underlying consequence of the loss of Usp9x. Detailed clinical assessment of all three families with USP9X variants identified hypotonia and behavioral and morphological defects as common features in addition to ID. Together our data support involvement of all three USP9X variants in ID in these families and provide likely cellular and molecular mechanisms involved.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 03/2014; 94(3):470-478. · 11.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine prospectively the frequency of pathogenic chromosomal microdeletions and microduplications in a large group of referred patients with developmental delay (DD), intellectual disability (ID) or autism spectrum disorders (ASD) within a genetic diagnostic service.First tier testing was applied using a standardised oligo-array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) platform, replacing conventional cytogenetic testing that would have been used in the past.Copy number variants (CNVs) found to be responsible for the clinical condition on the request form could all be subdivided into three groups: well established pathogenic microdeletion/microduplication/aneuploidy syndromes, predicted pathogenic CNVs as interpreted by the laboratory, and recently established pathogenic disease susceptibility CNVs. Totalled from these three groups, with CNVs of uncertain significance excluded, detection rates were: DD (13.0%), ID (15.6%), ASD (2.3%), ASD with DD (8.2%), ASD with ID (12.7%) and unexplained epilepsy with DD, ID and ASD (10.9%).The greater diagnostic sensitivity arising from routine application of array CGH, compared with previously used conventional cytogenetics, outweighs the interpretative issues for the reporting laboratory and referring clinician arising from detection of CNVs of uncertain significance. Precise determination of any previously hidden molecular defect responsible for the patient's condition is translated to improved genetic counselling.
    Pathology 12/2013; · 2.62 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Benign hereditary chorea caused by mutations in the NK2 homeobox 1 gene (NKX2-1), shares clinical features with ataxic and dyskinetic cerebral palsy (CP), resulting in the possibility of misdiagnosis. A father and his two children were considered to have ataxic CP until a possible diagnosis of benign familial chorea was made in the children in early teenage. The father's neurological condition had not been appreciated prior to examination of the affected son. Whole exome sequencing of blood derived DNA and bioinformatics analysis were performed. A 7 bp deletion in exon 1 of NKX2-1, resulting in a frame shift and creation of a premature termination codon, was identified in all affected individuals. Screening of 60 unrelated individuals with a diagnosis of dyskinetic or ataxic CP did not identify NKX2-1 mutations. BHC can be confused with ataxic and dyskinetic CP. Occasionally these children have a mutation in NKX2-1.
    European journal of medical genetics 07/2013; · 1.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background:To replicate single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations with preterm birth (PTB; birth <37 completed weeks of gestation) and synthesise currently available evidence using meta-analysis.Methods:Spontaneous PTB cases and controls were selected from an existing cohort. Candidate SNPs were taken from an existing genotype panel. A systematic review was conducted for each SNP in the panel to determine suitability as a PTB candidate. Those with significant associations previously reported in Caucasians were selected for replication. Candidate SNPs were already genotyped in cases and controls and clinical data accessed from state perinatal and cerebral palsy databases. Association analysis was conducted between each SNP and PTB and meta-analysis conducted if there were ≥three studies in the literature. Maternal and fetal SNPs were considered as separate candidates.Results:A cohort of 170 cases and 583 controls was formed. Eight SNPs from the original panel of genotyped SNPs were selected as PTB candidates and replication based on systematic literature review results. In our cohort, fetal Factor V Leiden (FVL) was significantly associated with PTB (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.31-5.17) and meta-analysis confirmed this association (OR 2.71, 95% CI 1.15-6.4).Conclusion:Replication and meta-analysis support an increased risk of PTB in Caucasians with the fetal FVL mutation.Pediatric Research (2013); doi:10.1038/pr.2013.117.
    Pediatric Research 07/2013; · 2.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: AIM: This study aims to examine single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations with cerebral palsy in a multi-variable analysis adjusting for potential clinical confounders and to assess SNP-SNP and SNP-maternal infection interactions as contributors to cerebral palsy. METHODS: A case control study including 587 children with cerebral palsy and 1154 control children without cerebral palsy. Thirty-nine candidate SNPs were genotyped in both mother and child. Data linkage to perinatal notes and cerebral palsy registers was performed with a supplementary maternal pregnancy questionnaire. History of known maternal infection during pregnancy was extracted from perinatal databases. RESULTS: Both maternal and fetal carriage of inducible nitric oxide synthase SNP rs1137933 were significantly negatively associated with cerebral palsy in infants born at less than 32 weeks gestation after adjustment for potential clinical confounders and correction for multiple testing (odds ratio 0.55, 95% confidence interval 0.38-0.79; odds ratio 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.4-0.82, respectively). Analysis did not show any statistically significant SNP-SNP or SNP-maternal infection interactions after correction for multiple testing. CONCLUSIONS: Maternal and child inducible nitric oxide synthase SNPs are associated with reduced risk of cerebral palsy in infants born very preterm. There was no evidence for statistically significant SNP-SNP or SNP-maternal infection interactions as modulators of cerebral palsy risk.
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 06/2013; · 1.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent studies have established the role of rare copy number variants (CNVs) in several neurological disorders but the contribution of rare CNVs to cerebral palsy (CP) is not known. Fifty Caucasian families having children with CP were studied using two microarray designs. Potentially pathogenic, rare (<1% population frequency) CNVs were identified, and their frequency determined, by comparing the CNVs found in cases with 8329 adult controls with no known neurological disorders. Ten of the 50 cases (20%) had rare CNVs of potential relevance to CP; there were a total of 14 CNVs, which were observed in <0.1% (<8/8329) of the control population. Eight inherited from an unaffected mother: a 751-kb deletion including FSCB, a 1.5-Mb duplication of 7q21.13, a 534-kb duplication of 15q11.2, a 446-kb duplication including CTNND2, a 219-kb duplication including MCPH1, a 169-kb duplication of 22q13.33, a 64-kb duplication of MC2R, and a 135-bp exonic deletion of SLC06A1. Three inherited from an unaffected father: a 386-kb deletion of 12p12.2-p12.1, a 234-kb duplication of 10q26.13, and a 4-kb exonic deletion of COPS3. The inheritance was unknown for three CNVs: a 157-bp exonic deletion of ACOX1, a 693-kb duplication of 17q25.3, and a 265-kb duplication of DAAM1. This is the first systematic study of CNVs in CP, and although it did not identify de novo mutations, has shown inherited, rare CNVs involving potentially pathogenic genes and pathways requiring further investigation.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 22 May 2013; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2013.93.
    European journal of human genetics: EJHG 05/2013; · 3.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is caused by heterogeneous pathologies leading to multiple antenatal joint contractures through fetal akinesia. Understanding the pathophysiology of this disorder is important for clinical care of the affected individuals and genetic counseling of the families. We thus aimed to establish the genetic basis of an AMC subtype that is associated with multiple dysmorphic features and intellectual disability (ID). We used haplotype analysis, next-generation sequencing, array comparative genomic hybridization, and chromosome breakpoint mapping to identify the pathogenic mutations in families and simplex cases. Suspected disease variants were verified by cosegregation analysis. We identified disease-causing mutations in the zinc-finger gene ZC4H2 in four families affected by X-linked AMC plus ID and one family affected by cerebral palsy. Several heterozygous females were also affected, but to a lesser degree. Furthermore, we found two ZC4H2 deletions and one rearrangement in two female and one male unrelated simplex cases, respectively. In mouse primary hippocampal neurons, transiently produced ZC4H2 localized to the postsynaptic compartment of excitatory synapses, and the altered protein influenced dendritic spine density. In zebrafish, antisense-morpholino-mediated zc4h2 knockdown caused abnormal swimming and impaired α-motoneuron development. All missense mutations identified herein failed to rescue the swimming defect of zebrafish morphants. We conclude that ZC4H2 point mutations, rearrangements, and small deletions cause a clinically variable broad-spectrum neurodevelopmental disorder of the central and peripheral nervous systems in both familial and simplex cases of both sexes. Our results highlight the importance of ZC4H2 for genetic testing of individuals presenting with ID plus muscle weakness and minor or major forms of AMC.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 04/2013; · 11.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Yunis-Varón syndrome (YVS) is an autosomal-recessive disorder with cleidocranial dysplasia, digital anomalies, and severe neurological involvement. Enlarged vacuoles are found in neurons, muscle, and cartilage. By whole-exome sequencing, we identified frameshift and missense mutations of FIG4 in affected individuals from three unrelated families. FIG4 encodes a phosphoinositide phosphatase required for regulation of PI(3,5)P2 levels, and thus endosomal trafficking and autophagy. In a functional assay, both missense substitutions failed to correct the vacuolar phenotype of Fig4-null mouse fibroblasts. Homozygous Fig4-null mice exhibit features of YVS, including neurodegeneration and enlarged vacuoles in neurons. We demonstrate that Fig4-null mice also have small skeletons with reduced trabecular bone volume and cortical thickness and that cultured osteoblasts accumulate large vacuoles. Our findings demonstrate that homozygosity or compound heterozygosity for null mutations of FIG4 is responsible for YVS, the most severe known human phenotype caused by defective phosphoinositide metabolism. In contrast, in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4J (also caused by FIG4 mutations), one of the FIG4 alleles is hypomorphic and disease is limited to the peripheral nervous system. This genotype-phenotype correlation demonstrates that absence of FIG4 activity leads to central nervous system dysfunction and extensive skeletal anomalies. Our results describe a role for PI(3,5)P2 signaling in skeletal development and maintenance.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 04/2013; · 11.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 has been established as a common cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). However, the minimum repeat number necessary for disease pathogenesis is not known. The aims of our study were to determine the frequency of the C9ORF72 repeat expansion in two FTD patient collections (one Australian and one Spanish, combined n = 190), to examine C9ORF72 expansion allele length in a subset of FTD patients, and to examine C9ORF72 allele length in 'non-expansion' patients (those with <30 repeats). The C9ORF72 repeat expansion was detected in 5-17% of patients (21-41% of familial FTD patients). For one family, the expansion was present in the proband but absent in the mother, who was diagnosed with dementia at age 68. No association was found between C9ORF72 non-expanded allele length and age of onset and in the Spanish sample mean allele length was shorter in cases than in controls. Southern blotting analysis revealed that one of the nine 'expansion-positive' patients examined, who had neuropathologically confirmed frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 pathology, harboured an 'intermediate' allele with a mean size of only ∼65 repeats. Our study indicates that the C9ORF72 repeat expansion accounts for a significant proportion of Australian and Spanish FTD cases. However, C9ORF72 allele length does not influence the age at onset of 'non-expansion' FTD patients in the series examined. Expansion of the C9ORF72 allele to as little as ∼65 repeats may be sufficient to cause disease.
    PLoS ONE 02/2013; 8(2):e56899. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The clinical significance of chromosomal microdeletions and microduplications was predicted based on their gene content, de novo or familial inheritance and accumulated knowledge recorded on public databases. A patient group comprised of 247 cases with epilepsy and its common co-morbidities of developmental delay, intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders, and congenital abnormalities was reviewed prospectively in a diagnostic setting using a standardized oligo-array CGH platform. Seventy-three (29.6%) had copy number variations (CNVs) and of these 73 cases, 27 (37.0%) had CNVs that were likely causative. These 27 cases comprised 10.9% of the 247 cases reviewed. The range of pathogenic CNVs associated with seizures was consistent with the existence of many genetic determinants for epilepsy. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B Neuropsychiatric Genetics 11/2012; · 3.27 Impact Factor
  • Jozef Gecz, Eric Haan
    The Lancet 09/2012; · 39.21 Impact Factor
  • Michael J Davies, Eric A Haan
    The Medical journal of Australia 09/2012; 197(5):259-60. · 2.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The extent to which birth defects after infertility treatment may be explained by underlying parental factors is uncertain. We linked a census of treatment with assisted reproductive technology in South Australia to a registry of births and terminations with a gestation period of at least 20 weeks or a birth weight of at least 400 g and registries of birth defects (including cerebral palsy and terminations for defects at any gestational period). We compared risks of birth defects (diagnosed before a child's fifth birthday) among pregnancies in women who received treatment with assisted reproductive technology, spontaneous pregnancies (i.e., without assisted conception) in women who had a previous birth with assisted conception, pregnancies in women with a record of infertility but no treatment with assisted reproductive technology, and pregnancies in women with no record of infertility. Of the 308,974 births, 6163 resulted from assisted conception. The unadjusted odds ratio for any birth defect in pregnancies involving assisted conception (513 defects, 8.3%) as compared with pregnancies not involving assisted conception (17,546 defects, 5.8%) was 1.47 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33 to 1.62); the multivariate-adjusted odds ratio was 1.28 (95% CI, 1.16 to 1.41). The corresponding odds ratios with in vitro fertilization (IVF) (165 birth defects, 7.2%) were 1.26 (95% CI, 1.07 to 1.48) and 1.07 (95% CI, 0.90 to 1.26), and the odds ratios with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) (139 defects, 9.9%) were 1.77 (95% CI, 1.47 to 2.12) and 1.57 (95% CI, 1.30 to 1.90). A history of infertility, either with or without assisted conception, was also significantly associated with birth defects. The increased risk of birth defects associated with IVF was no longer significant after adjustment for parental factors. The risk of birth defects associated with ICSI remained increased after multivariate adjustment, although the possibility of residual confounding cannot be excluded. (Funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council and the Australian Research Council.).
    New England Journal of Medicine 05/2012; 366(19):1803-13. · 54.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Intrauterine infection is a risk factor for cerebral palsy. Previous work reported a high frequency of viral DNA in newborn screening cards from cerebral palsy cases and controls possibly due to contamination. Methods: Retrospective case-control study using improved methodologies to minimize contamination during PCR-based detection of viral DNA sequences. Newborn screening cards of 339 Caucasian children with cerebral palsy and 594 controls were examined. Viruses tested were herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 (HSV1 and 2), varicella zoster virus (VZV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), human herpes viruses 6, 7 and 8 (HHV6, HHV7 and HHV8), and parvovirus B19. Genotyping was performed on DNA extracted from dried blood spots. Results: CMV and EBV were detected in 5 (1.5%) and 3 (0.9%) of 339 cases, respectively, but not in controls (p = 0.047 and 0.006). Frequencies of detection of the other viruses examined were similar for cases and controls. DNA from at least one of the nine viruses tested was found in 4.4% of cases and 3.1% of controls [OR 1.4 95% CI (0.71-2.76)]. Conclusion: Evidence of congenital viral infection was uncommon in cases of cerebral palsy and controls. However, CMV and EBV were significantly associated with cerebral palsy.
    The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine: the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians 02/2012; 25(10):2078-81. · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies have suggested associations between certain genetic variants and susceptibility to cerebral palsy (CP). This study was designed to assess established and novel maternal and child genetic and epidemiologic risk factors for CP along with their interactions. DNA from 587 case and 1154 control mother-child pairs was analyzed. A panel of 35 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were examined and included SNPs in genes associated with (1) thrombophilia, (2) inflammation, and (3) risk factors for CP (eg, preterm birth). Comparisons were specified a priori and made by using a χ(2) test. There were 40 fetal and 28 maternal associations with CP when analyzed by CP subtype, gestational age, genotypes of apolipoprotein E, and haplotypes of mannose-binding-lectin. After Bonferroni correction for multiple testing, no fetal or maternal candidate SNP was associated with CP or its subtypes. Only fetal carriage of prothrombin gene mutation remained marginally associated with hemiplegia in term infants born to mothers with a reported infection during pregnancy. Odds ratio directions of fetal SNP associations were compared with previously reported studies and confirmed no trend toward association. Except for the prothrombin gene mutation, individual maternal and fetal SNPs in our candidate panel were not found to be associated with CP outcome. Past reported SNP associations with CP were not confirmed, possibly reflecting type I error from small numbers and multiple testing in the original reports.
    PEDIATRICS 02/2012; 129(2):e414-23. · 5.30 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

3k Citations
907.15 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2003–2014
    • University of Adelaide
      • • School of Paediatrics and Reproductive Health
      • • Discipline of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
      Tarndarnya, South Australia, Australia
  • 1996–2011
    • Women`s and Children`s Hospital
      Tarndarnya, South Australia, Australia
  • 2007–2008
    • Flinders University
      • Department of Rehabilitation and Aged Care
      Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
  • 1988–1993
    • Royal Adelaide Hospital
      • Department of Genetic Medicine
      Tarndarnya, South Australia, Australia
  • 1990
    • Wellington Hospital
      Веллингтон, England, United Kingdom