Hyun-Joo Kong

National Cancer Center Korea, Kōyō, Gyeonggi Province, South Korea

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Publications (24)49.93 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: In recent years, some reports have suggested that papillary thyroid cancers are more frequently associated with lymphocytic thyroiditis or Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This study investigated a potential increase in the prevalence of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis among papillary thyroid cancer patients.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(6):e99054. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although the cancer stage at diagnosis is the most important prognostic factor for patients' survival, there are few population-based estimates of stage-specific survival outcome, especially in Asian countries. Our study aims to estimate stage-specific survival for Korean patients. We analyzed the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database data on 626,506 adult patients aged ≥ 20 years, who were diagnosed between 2006 and 2010 with stomach, colorectal, liver, lung, breast, cervix, prostate, and thyroid cancers. Patients were followed up to December 2011, and the 5-year relative survival rates (RSRs) were calculated for gender and age group by Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) stage at diagnosis. The 5-year RSRs for all localized-stage cancers, except for lung and liver, exceeded 90% with that for thyroid cancer being the highest at 100.4%. These values for distant stage liver, lung, and stomach cancers were very dismal at 2.5%, 4.8%, and 5.5%, respectively, while it was 69.1% for thyroid cancer, and was in the range of 18.3-36.4% for colorectal, cervix, breast and prostate cancers. Overall, the 5-year RSRs for all cancer types decreased with aging across all the disease stages with exception of prostate cancer, which suggests biologic difference in these cancer types in a young age group. When compared with US SEER data, Korean patients had better stage-specific survival rates for stomach, colorectal, liver, and cervical cancers. Korean cancer patients showed relatively favorable stage distribution and 5-year RSRs, which suggests potential contribution of the national cancer screening program.
    Cancer Research and Treatment 09/2013; 45(3):162-71. · 1.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This article gives an overview of nationwide cancer statistics, including incidence, mortality, survival and prevalence, and their trends in Korea based on 2010 cancer incidence data. Incidence data from 1993 to 2010 were obtained from the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database, and vital status was followed until 31 December 2011. Mortality data from 1983 to 2010 were obtained from Statistics Korea. Crude and age-standardized rates for incidence, mortality, prevalence, and relative survival were calculated. In total, 202,053 cancer cases and 72,046 cancer deaths occurred during 2010, and 960,654 prevalent cancer cases were identified in Korea as of 1 January 2011. The incidence of all cancers combined showed an annual increase of 3.3% from 1999 to 2010. The incidences of liver and cervical cancers have decreased while those of thyroid, breast, prostate and colorectal cancers have increased. Notably, thyroid cancer, which is the most common cancer in Korea, increased by 24.2% per year rapidly in both sexes. The mortality of all cancers combined showed a decrease by 2.7% annually from 2002 to 2010. Five-year relative survival rates of patients who were diagnosed with cancer from 2006 to 2011 had improved by 22.9% compared with those from 1993 to 1995. While the overall cancer incidence in Korea has increased rapidly, age-standardized cancer mortality rates have declined since 2002 and survival has improved.
    Cancer Research and Treatment 03/2013; 45(1):1-14. · 1.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To estimate the current cancer burden in Korea, cancer incidence and mortality rates were projected for the year 2013. Cancer incidence data from 1999 to 2010 were obtained from the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database, and cancer mortality data from 1993 to 2011 were obtained from Statistics Korea. Cancer incidence in 2013 was projected by fitting a linear regression model to observed age-specific cancer incidence rates against observed years, then multiplying the projected age-specific rates by the age-specific population. For cancer mortality, a similar procedure was used, except that a Joinpoint regression model was used to determine at which year the linear trend changed significantly. In total, 247,732 new cancer cases and 74,179 cancer deaths are projected to occur in Korea in 2013. For all sites combined, the crude incidence rates are projected to be 489.8 and 492.2, and the age-standardized incidences to be 350.4 and 318.4 per 100,000 for males and females, respectively. Cancer has become an important public health concern in Korea, and as the Korean population ages, the cancer burden will continue to increase.
    Cancer Research and Treatment 03/2013; 45(1):15-21. · 1.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our study aims to describe changes in carcinoma in situ (CIS) and invasive cervical carcinoma (ICC) in Korean women diagnosed between 1993 and 2009. All cases of CIS and invasive cervical carcinoma diagnosed from 1993 to 2009 in the Korean National Cancer Incidence database were analyzed. Age-standardized rates (ASRs) and annual percent changes (APCs) in incidence rates were compared according to age and histological type. Additionally, we used Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) to know the association between screening rate for cervical cancer and incidence rate of cervical cancer. Between 1993 and 2009, 72,240 cases of ICC were reported in Korea. Total incidence rate of ICC was 14.7 per 100,000 females. ASRs of ICC declined 3.8% per year, from 19.3 per 100,000 in 1993 to 10.5 per 100,000 in 2009. Although the overall incidence rate of adenocarcinoma remained stable, invasive squamous cell carcinoma showed a decreasing trend (APC -4.2%). For women aged 60-79 years, ASRs for squamous cell carcinoma increased from 1993 to 2001, and decreased from 2001 to 2009 (APC: -4.6%). Total 62,300 cases of CIS were diagnosed from 1993 to 2009. Total incidence rate of CIS was 12.2 per 100,000 females. ASRs of CIS increased 5.7% per year, from 7.5 per 100,000 in 1993 to 19.0 per 100,000 in 2009. Adenocarcinoma in situ increased 13.2% per year. There was a strong positive correlation between screening rate for cervical cancer and incidence rate for CIS (p-value = 0.03) whereas screening rate showed a strong negative correlation with incidence rate for squamous ICC (p-value = 0.04). The increasing trend in CIS, coupled with a decreasing trend in ICC, suggests the important role of cervix cancer screening. The incidence of adenocarcinoma showed a plateau, but the incidence of adenocarcinoma in situ showed an increasing trend.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(8):e72012. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Primary brain tumors are relatively uncommon but particularly lethal cancers. Although survival is useful for monitoring the effects of early cancer detection and treatment, there are few population-based estimates of survival for subjects with brain tumors, especially in Asian countries. Using the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database, 4,721 newly diagnosed cases of histologically confirmed malignant primary brain tumors from 1999 to 2004 were analyzed for observed survival. For trend analyses of glioblastomas, we included 2,751 glioblastoma cases diagnosed between 1999 and 2007. We compared survival by age group and histological type by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. For all ages and all brain tumor types in Korea, five-year survival was 37.5 %. For each histological type of brain tumor survival of pediatric and younger adult populations was much better than that of older adults. Five-year survival for glioblastoma, astrocytoma, anaplastic astrocytoma, and oligodendroglioma was 8.9, 51.6, 25.2, and 73.5 %, respectively. Two-year survival for glioblastoma increased from 18.6 % for cases diagnosed in 1999-2001 to 21.3 % for cases diagnosed in 2002-2004 and to 24.7 % for cases diagnosed in 2005-2007. These results may help clinicians and patients to assess long-term prognoses for brain tumors, and the data presented here could serve as master control data set for single-arm clinical trials, especially in Asian populations.
    Journal of Neuro-Oncology 06/2012; 109(2):301-7. · 3.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study overviews nationwide cancer statistics, including incidence, mortality, survival, and prevalence, and their trends in Korea based on 2009 cancer incidence data. Incidence data from 1993-2009 were obtained from the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database, and vital status was followed through 31 December 2010. Mortality data from 1983-2009 were obtained from Statistics Korea. Crude rates and age-standardized rates for incidence, mortality, and prevalence; and relative survival were calculated. In total, 192,561 cancer cases and 69,780 cancer deaths were observed during 2009, and 808,503 10-year cancer prevalent cases occurred in Korea as of 1 January 2010. The incidence rate for all cancers combined showed an annual increase of 3.3% from 1999 to 2009. Stomach, liver and cervical cancers have been decreasing and thyroid, breast and colorectal cancers have been increasing at large. In particular, in 2009, colorectal cancer became the third most common cancer in females and for the first time ranked higher than stomach cancer, which had been the long-standing common cancer in Korea. While overall cancer incidence has been rapidly increasing in Korea, age-standardized cancer mortality rates have been declining since 2002, and cancer survival has been improving.
    Cancer Research and Treatment 03/2012; 44(1):11-24. · 1.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To estimate the current cancer burden in Korea, cancer incidence and mortality rates were projected for the year 2012. The cancer incidence data from 1999 to 2009 were obtained from the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database, and the cancer mortality data from 1993 to 2010 were obtained from Statistics Korea. Cancer incidence in 2012 was projected by fitting a linear regression model on observed age-specific cancer incidence rates against observed years, then multiplying the projected age-specific rates by the age-specific population. For cancer mortality, a similar procedure was applied, except that a Joinpoint regression model was used to determine at which year the linear trend significantly changed. A total of 234,727 new cancer cases and 73,313 cancer deaths are projected to occur in Korea in 2012. For all sites combined, the crude incidence rates are projected to be 465.6 and 459.7, and the age-standardized incidences to be 345.1 and 300.9 per 100,000 respectively for males and females. Cancer has become an important public health concern in Korea, and as the Korean population ages, the cancer burden will continue to increase.
    Cancer Research and Treatment 03/2012; 44(1):25-31. · 1.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The nationwide statistical analysis of hematologic malignancies in Korea has not been reported yet. The Korea Central Cancer Registry and the Korean Society of Hematology jointly investigated domestic incidence rates and prevalence of hematologic malignancies occurred between 1999 and 2008, and analyzed survival rates of patients who were diagnosed between 1993 and 2008. Data of hematologic malignancies from 1993 to 2008 were obtained from the Korean National Cancer Incidence Data base. The crude incidence rates, age-specific incidence rates, age-standardized incidence rates, annual percentage change of incidence, and prevalence from 1999-2008 were calculated. Survival rates for patients diagnosed in 1993-2008 were estimated. In 2008, a total of 8,006 cases of hematologic malignancies were occurred, which comprised 4.5% of all malignancies. In all genders, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, myeloid leukemia, and multiple myeloma were most frequent diseases. In terms of age, ages between 60 and 69 were most prevalent. From 1999 to 2008, the age-standardized incidence rates increased from 10.2 to 13.7, and the annual percentage change was 3.9%. The 5-year survival rate increased from 38.2% during 1993-1995 to 55.2% during 2004-2008. As of January 2009, number of patients with 10-year prevalence was 33,130, and with 5- to 10-year prevalence was 10,515. This is the first nationwide statistical report of hematologic malignancies in Korea. It could be used as the basic information to help investigate epidemiologic characteristics, evaluate progress during the past years, and establish future strategies for hematologic malignancies. Periodic statistical analysis of hematologic malignancies in Korea should be continued.
    The Korean journal of hematology 03/2012; 47(1):28-38.
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    ABSTRACT: Sex differences have been reported in the prognosis of certain cancers. In this study, we investigated whether Korean females display better survival rates compared with male patients for solid tumor sites. We analyzed data from the Korean National Cancer Incidence Database from 599,288 adult patients diagnosed with solid cancers between 2005 and 2009. Patients were followed until December 2010. We applied a relative excess risk (RER) model adjusting for year of follow-up, age at diagnosis, and stage at diagnosis. For all solid cancer sites combined, women displayed an 11% lower risk of death compared to men (RER 0.89; 95% CI 0.88-0.90) after adjusting for year of follow-up, age, stage, and case mix. Women showed significantly lower RERs for the following sites: head/neck, esophagus, small intestine, liver, nasal cavities, lung, bone/cartilages, melanoma of skin, soft tissue, brain and CNS, and thyroid. In contrast, women displayed a poorer prognosis than did men for colorectal, laryngeal, kidney and bladder cancer. However, the survival gaps between men and women narrowed by increase in age; female patients over 75 years of age displayed a 3% higher RER of death compared with males in this age group. Female cancer patients display an improved survival for the majority of solid tumor sites, even after adjustment for age and stage. Age at diagnosis was the major contributor to the women's survival advantage.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(12):e52457. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To estimate the current cancer burden in Korea, cancer incidence and mortality were projected for the year 2011. The cancer incidence data from 1999-2008 were obtained from the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database, and the cancer mortality data from 1993-2009 were obtained from the Korea National Statistics Office. Cancer incident cases and rates in 2011 were projected from fitting a linear regression model on observed age-specific cancer incidence rates against observed years, then multiplying the projected age-specific rates by the age-specific population. For cancer mortality, a similar procedure was applied for projection except that a Joinpoint regression model was used to determine at which year the linear trend significantly changed. A total of 216,809 new cancer cases and 71,036 cancer deaths are projected to occur in Korea in 2011. For all sites combined, the crude incidence rates are projected to be 437.9 and 420.5 and the age-standardized incidence rates are projected to be 336.5 and 279.7 per 100,000 for men and women, respectively. Cancer has become an important public health concern in Korea, and as Korea becomes an aged society, the cancer burden will continue to increase.
    Cancer Research and Treatment 03/2011; 43(1):12-8. · 1.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This paper overviews the nationwide cancer statistics including incidence, mortality, survival and prevalence, and their trends in Korea based on the year 2008 cancer incidence data. Incidence data from 1993 to 2008 were obtained from the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database, and the vital status was followed through December 31, 2009. Mortality data from 1983 to 2008 were obtained from the Korea National Statistics Office. Crude rates and age-standardized rates for incidence, mortality, prevalence and relative survival were calculated. There were 178,816 cancer cases and 68,912 cancer deaths observed during year 2008 and 724,663 10-year cancer prevalent cases as of January 1, 2009 in Korea. The incidence rate for all cancer combined showed an annual increase of 3.1% from 1999 to 2008. With significantly increasing cancer incidence, Korea faces a large cancer burden and efficient cancer control programs are essential.
    Cancer Research and Treatment 03/2011; 43(1):1-11. · 1.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cancer has been the leading cause of death in Korea. Korea is facing a very rapid change and increase in cancer incidence, which draws much attention in public health. This paper overviews the nationwide cancer statistics, including incidence, mortality, and survival rates, and their trends in Korea based on the cancer incidence data from The Korea Central Cancer Registry (KCCR) in year 2006 and 2007. In Korea, there were 153,237 cancer cases and 65,519, cancer deaths observed in 2006, and 161,920 cancer cases and 67,561 cancer deaths in 2007, respectively. The incidence rate for all cancer combined showed an annual increase of 2.8% from 1999 to 2007. Specifically, there was significant increase in the incidence of colorectal, thyroid, female breast, and prostate cancers. The number of cancer deaths has increased over the past two decades, due mostly to population aging, while the age-standardized mortality rates have decreased in both men and women since 2002. Notable improvement has been observed in the 5-yr relative survival rates for most major cancers and for all cancer combined, with the exception of pancreatic cancer. The nationwide cancer statistics in this paper will provide essential data for cancer research and evidence-based health policy in Korea.
    Journal of Korean medical science 08/2010; 25(8):1113-21. · 0.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In 2009, infection with the liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) was classified as "carcinogenic to humans" (Group 1) based on its involvement in the etiology of cholangiocarcinoma by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. However, little is known about the descriptive epidemiology of cholangiocarcinoma in Korea. We examined incidence trends of intrahepatic and extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, using data from the Korea National Cancer Incidence database for 1999-2005. The prevalence of C. sinensis infection was estimated from a recent population-based survey in rural endemic areas. Cholangiocarcinoma incidence rates are currently rising, even while primary liver cancer incidence rates are decreasing. Annual percent changes in cholangiocarcinoma incidence rates were 8% for males and 11% in females. Known areas of C. sinensis endemicity showed high incidence rates of cholangiocarcinoma. The positivity of C. sinensis eggs in stool samples from endemic areas was more than 25% of adults tested during 2005-2008. From a meta-analysis, the summary odds ratio for cholangiocarcinoma due to C. sinensis infection was 4.7 (95% confidence interval: 2.2-9.8). Approximately 10% of cholangiocarcinomas in Korea were caused by chronic C. sinensis infections. More specific policies, including health education and an extensive effort for early detection in endemic areas, are needed.
    Journal of Korean medical science 07/2010; 25(7):1011-6. · 0.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although survival rates are very useful for monitoring the effects of early cancer detection and treatment, at present there are only limited population-based estimates of long-term survival rates in Korea. Furthermore, published data are only available for 5-year survival; 10-year survival rates have hitherto not been reported. We therefore analysed data from the Korean National Cancer Incidence Database between 1993 and 2007 and followed through into 2008 to estimate long-term survival rates and trends at 5 and 10 years after diagnosis of all cancers combined. Further analysis was conducted on the 19 most common cancers in Korea. From 1993 to 2007, the 10-year relative survival rates (RSRs) for all cancer types combined were 36.3% and 56.4% in Korean men and women, respectively. The 10-year RSRs for all cancers combined improved from 29.5% and 50.5% during 1993-1998 to 39.2% and 58.9% during 1999-2007 in Korean men and women, respectively. From 1993 to 2007, the 5-year and 10-year RSRs thus improved in both sexes for the most common cancers. In the 75 years and older group, increases of the 5-year and 10-year RSR for all combined, and for most of the major cancers were lower than all other age groups. This study provides population-based estimates of long-term survival and confirms improvements of long-term survivals for all cancer sites and for most of the major cancer sites. Improvements of survival for young patients are more significant than for older patients. The results may help clinicians and patients assess long-term prognosis.
    Asian Pacific journal of cancer prevention: APJCP 01/2010; 11(6):1459-64. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cancer has been the most common cause of death in Korea since 1983 and is a major public concern. The aim of this study was to analyze the secular trend of cancer mortality in Korea from 1983 to 2007. Mortality and population data from 1983 to 2007 were obtained from the Korea Statistical Office. The annual cancer death rates for 18 age groups were estimated, and joinpoint regression was applied to detect significant changes in cancer mortality. The age-standardized mortality rate for all sites combined increased until the mid-1990s and has been decreasing thereafter, this also being the case for cancers of the esophagus, liver, lung and bladder, as well as leukemia. With stomach and uterine cancers a constant reduction was evident throughout the period. The declines in stomach, liver, and uterine cancer mortality have made major contributions to the recent overall favorable trend. Mortality for cancers of the colon and rectum and the prostate increased in the early 2000s and then leveled off, whereas female breast cancer mortality has displayed a constant increasing trend. In conclusion, overall cancer mortality is decreasing in men and women in Korea, and this trend will probably continue and improve further in line with advances in management as well as the expected impact of the national screening program for major five cancers over the next decades.
    Asian Pacific journal of cancer prevention: APJCP 01/2010; 11(6):1451-7. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cancer has been the most common cause of death in Korea since 1983 and is a major public health concern. This paper overviews the nationwide cancer statistics, including incidence, mortality, and survival rates, and their trends in Korea. In 2005, 142,610 new cancer cases and 65,117 cancer deaths occurred in Korea. The incidence rate for all cancer combined increased by 2.6% annually from 1999 to 2005. Significant increases have occurred in the incidence of colorectal, thyroid, female breast, and prostate cancers. The number of cancer deaths has increased over the past two decades, due mostly to population aging, while the age-standardized mortality rates have decreased in both men and women since 2002. Notable improvement has been observed in the 5-yr relative survival rates for most major cancers and for all cancer combined, with the exception of pancreatic cancer. The nationwide cancer statistics in this paper will provide essential data for evidence-based decisions in the national cancer control program in Korea.
    Journal of Korean medical science 12/2009; 24(6):995-1003. · 0.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To estimate the current cancer burden in Korea, newly diagnosed cancer cases and cancer incidence rates were calculated for the years 2003~2005. The cancer incidence cases and rates were calculated from the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database. Crude and age-standardized incidence rates were calculated by gender for specified cancer sites in 5-year age groups. From 2003 to 2005, 398,824 cases of cancer were newly diagnosed in Korea (218,856 in men and 179,968 in women). For all sites combined, the crude incidence rate (CR) was 300.0 and 248.2 for men and women and the age-standardized incidence rate (ASR) was 297.0 and 191.2 per 100,000, respectively. Among men, five leading cancers were stomach (CR 66.0, ASR 64.2), lung (CR 48.5, ASR 50.3), liver (CR 44.9, ASR 42.1), colon and rectum (CR 37.9, ASR 37.2), and prostate cancer (CR 12.7, ASR 13.8). Among women, five leading cancers were breast (CR 37.3, ASR 29.0), thyroid (CR 36.2, ASR 28.8), stomach (CR 34.1, ASR 25.4), colon and rectum (CR 28.0, ASR 21.1), and lung cancer (CR 17.9, ASR 12.8). In the 0~14-year-old group, leukemia was the most common in both sexes; in the 15~34 group, the most common cancer was stomach cancer for men and thyroid cancer for women; in the 35~64 group, stomach cancer for men and breast cancer for women; among those 65 and over, lung cancer for men and stomach cancer, for women, respectively. The cancer incidence rates have increased in recent years, and more cancers are expected to develop as Korea is quickly becoming an aged society. The cancer incidence statistics in this report can be used as an important source to effectively plan and evaluate the cancer control program in Korea.
    Cancer Research and Treatment 09/2009; 41(3):122-31. · 1.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In areas where hepatitis is endemic, little is known about the sexual transmission of HBV after introduction of an HBV vaccination program. We used a self-administered questionnaire and serological tests for HBsAg, anti-HBs, anti-HBc, and anti-HCV to examine the role of sexual activity, as well as sociodemographic status, lifestyle habits, and a history of vaccinations, transfusions, and surgery, in the transmission of HBV and HCV in Korea. The subjects were 865 female and 541 male university students (median age, 19 years; age range, 16-25). Overall seropositivity was 8.1% for HBsAg, 69.3% for anti-HBs, 21.3% for anti-HBc, and 0.4% for anti-HCV. Regarding HBV, 8% of the subjects were chronic carriers or had recently been infected, 22.8% were never exposed and nonvaccinated, 16.6% were exposed noncarriers, and 52.7% had most likely been vaccinated. We found a significant association between HBsAg seropositivity and history of sexual intercourse (Odds Ratio, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1-2.8). Students without serologic evidence of immunization against HBV were more likely to have become HBsAg-positive after becoming sexually active. Our findings suggest that sexual transmission does occur among adolescents and young adults who have not been vaccinated, whereas vaccination protects individuals from becoming an HBV carrier after becoming sexually active.
    Journal of Epidemiology 09/2009; 19(5):213-8. · 2.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Since the revised Cancer Act of October 2006, cancer registration was reactivated, based on the Statistics Law. The incidence of cancer during 2002 was calculated on the basis of the information available from the National Cancer Incidence Database. Crude and age-standardized rates were calculated by gender for 18 age groups (0 approximately 4, 5 approximately 9, 10 approximately 14, every five years, 85 years and over). The overall crude incidence rates (CRs) were 269.2 and 212.8 per 100,000 for males and females, and the overall age-standardized incidence rates (ASRs) were 287.8 and 172.9 per 100,000, respectively. Among males, the five leading primary cancer sites were stomach (CR 62.4, ASR 65.7), lung (CR 45.4, ASR 51.0), liver (CR 43.2, ASR 43.7), colon and rectum (CR 30.7, ASR 32.7), and prostate (CR 8.0, ASR 9.6). Among females, the most common cancer sites were breast (CR 33.1, ASR 26.9), followed by stomach (CR 32.8, ASR 26.0), colon and rectum (CR 23.1, ASR 18.5), thyroid (CR 19.1, ASR 15.7), and uterine cervix (CR 18.2, ASR 14.7). In the 0~14 age group, leukemia was the most common cancer for both genders. For males, stomach cancer was the most common cancer in the 15 approximately 64 age-group, but lung cancer was more frequent in men 65 or older. For females, thyroid cancer among the 15 approximately 34 age-group, breast cancer among 35 approximately 64 age-group and stomach cancer in women 65 years or older were the most common forms of cancer for each age group. The quality indices for the percentage of deaths, by death certificate only, were 4.7% for males and 4.5% for females. Since the National Cancer Incidence Database was started, the annual percent change of cancer cases increased by 4.8% (4.1% for males, 5.7% for females) during 1999 approximately 2002. This value reflects the increase in prostate cancer for males and breast and thyroid cancer in females during 2002. The timely reporting of improved quality of cancer registration is needed for evidence-based decisions regarding cancer control in Korea.
    Cancer Research and Treatment 12/2007; 39(4):139-49. · 1.96 Impact Factor