Fernanda Miori Pascon

University of Campinas, Conceição de Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil

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Publications (35)25.37 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the push-out bond strength (PBS) to root dentin of composite relined fiber glass posts cemented into the roots of extracted bovine teeth using different adhesive cementation protocols. Method: Eighteen roots of bovine teeth were used (n=6). Crowns were removed and roots were embedded in polystyrene resin blocks and sectioned, leaving the root portion with 20 mm. Dental root canals were prepared using burs system provided by fiber post manufacturer (WhitePost, FGM), allowing a uniform post space. Posts were silanated (Prosil, FGM) and the root canal was lubricated with a water-soluble glycerin gel to allow the fiber posts relined with composite resin (Z100, 3M ESPE). Three adhesive cementation protocols were evaluated: etch-and rinse adhesive system (Scotchbond Multi Purpose, 3M ESPE) followed by RelyX ARC resin cement (3M ESPE) (SBMP+ARC); self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem 2, 3M ESPE) (RU2) and multi-mode adhesive (Scothbond Universal, 3M ESPE) followed by resin cement (RelyX Ultimate, 3M ESPE) (SBU+ULT). Roots were sectioned and evaluated at four depths (cervical to apical), by push-out test, which was performed in a universal testing machine (Instron 4411) until bond failure (0.5mm/min). Data were analyzed using a two-way split-plot ANOVA and Tukey test (p≤0.05). Result: Table 1. Means (SD) of PBS according to the group and depth (I=cervical;II=cervical/medium;III-medium/apical;IV-apical). Depth Group SBMP+ARC RU2 SBU+ULT I 5.8 (1.8)Aa 7.8 (1.8)Aa 6.5 (3.4)Aa II 4.1 (2.2)Aab 6.23 (1.7)Aab 7.1 (2.7)Aab III 3.9 (2.5)Abc 5.1 (1.2)Abc 5.7 (3.3)Abc IV 3.1 (1.7)Ac 4.1 (2.0)Ac 3.1 (1.8)Ac Means followed by different letters (upper case in the row and lower case in the columns) are significant different (p<0,05). Conclusion: No statistical differences were found in PBS for different adhesive cementation techniques of relining fiber glass posts to dentin roots. PBS decreased according to increasing depth of fiber glass posts for all cementing systems tested.
    AADR Annual Meeting & Exhibition 2014; 03/2014
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the effects of chemical agents on the physical properties and structure of primary pulp chamber dentin using surface roughness, microhardness tests, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Twenty-five primary teeth were sectioned exposing the pulp chamber and were divided into five groups (n = 5): NT, no treatment; SH1, 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl); SH1U, 1% NaOCl + Endo-PTC®; SH1E, 1% NaOCl + 17% EDTA; and E, 17% EDTA. After dentin treatment, the specimens were submitted to roughness, microhardness testing, and SEM analysis. Roughness and microhardness data were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (P < 0.05). The SH1E group showed the highest roughness, followed by the E group (P < 0.05) when compared with the NT, SH1, and SH1U groups. Microhardness values of SH1 and SH1U showed no significant difference as compared to the NT (control) group (P > 0.05). Microhardness values could not be obtained in the EDTA groups (SH1E and E). The presence of intertubular dentin with opened dentin tubules was observed in the NT, SH1, and SH1U groups. SH1E showed eroded and disorganized dentin with few opened tubules and the intertubular/peritubular dentin was partially removed. Considering the physical and structural approaches and the chemical agents studied, it can be concluded that NaOCl and NaOCl associated with Endo-PTC® were the agents that promoted the smallest changes in surface roughness, microhardness, and structure of the pulp chamber dentin of primary teeth.
    Microscopy Research and Technique 01/2014; 77(1):52-6. · 1.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated structural and molecular issues of dentin caries-like lesions produced by different artificial models (ACL) compared with natural caries lesions (NCL). One hundred twenty-four sound occlusal dentin blocks and 47 carious blocks were obtained and surface hardness was analyzed (SH1). They were assigned to groups according to ACL: GB: Biological; GC: Chemical; GIS: In situ; GNC: natural caries (control). Blocks from groups 1, 2 and 3 were submitted to caries lesion induction. NCL and ACL blocks were submitted to surface hardness (SH 2), FT-Raman and µEDXRF analysis. All blocks were longitudinally sectioned and one of the halves was submitted to cross-sectional hardness (CSH) and the other to SEM analysis. SH1 and SH2 data were submitted to t test (unpaired and paired, respectively), CSH and SEM data to two-way and one-way ANOVA respectively, and Tukey and t tests, respectively (p<0.05). Data from FT-Raman/µEDXRF were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Dunnett multiple-comparisons test (a=0.05). GB and GNC showed lowest SH2 values that were significantly different from GC and GIS. Regarding CSH, GB and GNC showed no significant difference between them. SEM showed similar caries lesion depth for GB and GNC, being significantly higher than for GC and GIS. µEDXRF showed similar values of calcium and phosphate for GB and GNC; GNC values were significantly different from GIS. No significant difference was found among the groups concerning phosphate, carbonate and CH bonds values. For collagen type I, GC values were significantly different compared to other groups. It may be concluded that caries-like lesions produced by GB were the closest model to NCL.
    Brazilian dental journal 12/2013; 24(6):610-8.
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the effect of fluoride and non-fluoride sealants on hardness decrease (HD) and marginal adaptation (MA) on enamel substrates after cariogenic challenge. METHODS: Occlusal enamel blocks, from human third molars, were randomly divided into six groups (n=12), according to occlusal fissures condition (S - sound; C - caries-like lesion; CF - caries-like lesion+topical fluoride) and sealants (F - FluroShield; H - Helioseal Clear Chroma). Lesion depths were 79.3±33.9 and 61.3±23.9 for C and CF groups, respectively. Sealants were placed on occlusal surface and stored at 100% humidity (37°C; 24h/d). HD was measured by cross-sectional microhardness analysis at the sealant margin distances: -1 (under sealant), 0 (sealant margin), 1, 2 (outer sealant). Sealant MA was observed by polarized light microscopy and scored according to: 0 - failure (no sealant MA or total sealant loss); 1 - success (sealant MA present). MA and HD were analysed by ANOVA-R and mixed model analysis, respectively. RESULTS: For HD (ΔS), F values (6900.5±3686.6) were significantly lower than H values (8534.6±5375.3) regardless of enamel substrates and sealant margin distances. Significant differences were observed among sealant margin distances: -1 (5934.0±3282.6)<0 (8701.5±6175.7)=1 (8473.2±4299.4)=2 (7761.5±4035.1), regardless of sealant and substrate. MA was similar for all groups (p≥0.05). CONCLUSION: MA was not affected by sealant type or substrate condition, whereas enamel HD was favourably impacted by fluoride in the sealant. In addition, sealants were more effective as a physical barrier than as its chemical potency in reducing enamel HD. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Sealing with a fluoride material is a recommended procedure to prevent caries of occlusal permanent molars in high-caries-risk patients, even though those exhibiting white spot lesions, since the enamel hardness decrease when fluoride sealant was used in vitro.
    Journal of dentistry 10/2012; · 3.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We examine the morphological and chemical changes in the pulp chamber dentin after using endodontic agents by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman), and micro energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μEDXRF). Thirty teeth were sectioned exposing the pulp chamber and divided by six groups (n=5): NT-no treatment; CHX-2% chlorhexidine; CHXE-2% chlorhexidine+17% EDTA; E-17% EDTA; SH5-5.25% NaOCl; SH5E-5.25% NaOCl+17% EDTA. The inorganic and organic content was analyzed by FT-Raman. μEDXRF examined calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) content as well as Ca/P ratio. Impressions of specimens were evaluated by SEM. Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (p<0.05). Differences were observed among groups for the 960 cm(-1) peak. Ca and P content differences were significant (SH5>NT=SH5E>CHX>E>CHXE). CHXE and E presented the highest Ca/P ratio values compared to the other groups (p<0.05). The SEM images in the EDTA-treated groups had the highest number of open tubules. Erosion in the tubules was observed in CHX and SH5E groups. Endodontic agents change the inorganic and organic content of pulp chamber dentin. NaOCl used alone, or in association with EDTA, was the most effective agent considering chemical and morphological approaches.
    Journal of Biomedical Optics 07/2012; 17(7):075008. · 2.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to verify the effects of chemical agents, frequently used in endodontics, on the microhardness, surface roughness and structure of the primary pulp chamber dentin. Method: Twenty-five sound anterior primary teeth were selected. The crowns were sectioned longitudinally to expose the pulp chamber. The specimens were divided into 5 groups (n=5) according to the agents: NT–no treatment (control group), SH1-1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), SH1U-1% NaOCl+urea peroxide, SH1E-1% NaOCl+17% EDTA, E-17% EDTA, and submitted to microhardness (VHN) testing, surface roughness and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (p<.05). SEM images obtained were described qualitatively. Result: VHN values of SH1 (11.46) and SH1U (14.74) showed no significant difference compared to control group (NT) (16.16). VHN could not be measured in EDTA groups. SH1E (1.17) showed the highest values of roughness, followed by E (0.61). NT (0.25), SH1 (0.18) and SH1U (0.15) showed no differences among them (p>.05). Major alterations were observed for the SH1E and E with exposure of dentin tubules and reduction of intertubular dentin. Conclusion: It could be concluded that sodium hypochlorite used alone or associated with urea peroxide was a better agent than others considering mechanical and structural approaches to the primary pulp chamber primary dentin.
    IADR General Session 2012; 06/2012
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of different filling materials and cleaning agents on root dentin of primary teeth on the bond strength of a glass fiber post. Method: One hundred twenty roots of primary bovine teeth were selected and endodontically prepared. The roots were divided into four groups according to the filling materials (n=30): G1- Control (no material); G2- Calen® past + zinc oxide; G3- Vitapex® past; G4- Calcipex II® past. After 7 days, the filling materials were removed and the roots were subdivided according to the cleaning agents (n=10): SA- No cleaning (control); SB- 70% ethanol; SC- Tergenform®. Glass fiber posts were luted using dual polymerized resin cement RelyX ARC® after acid etching, rinsing and application of adhesive system Adper Single Bond 2®. After 7 days, samples were sectioned into 1-mm thick slabs and push-out test was performed in a universal machine. Result: Data obtained were submitted to two-way ANOVA (filling materials x cleaning agents) and Tukey test was applied for comparison between groups at 5% significance level. It was observed an interaction between the studied factors (p<0.001). The highest values were observed for the combinations: Calen®+OZ with 70% ethanol (12.21±2.73), followed by Vitapex® with Tergenform® (7.98±1.98), Control without cleaning (7.88±3.25), Calcipex II® with Tergenform® (7.46±2.29), Calcipex II® without cleaning (6.28±3.45), Vitapex® without cleaning (6.12±2.82), with no significant difference between groups. The lowest values were observed for group Control with Tergenform® (4.37±3.07). Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the different filling materials and cleaning agents influenced the bond strength; when the Calen® past with zinc oxide was chose for root canal filling the best cleaning agent was 70% ethanol, while for the Vitapex® and Calcipex II® pastes, the best cleaning agent was Tergenform® or without cleaning.
    IADR General Session 2012; 06/2012
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of glass and silica fillercontent on push-out bond strength and film thickness of experimental composites cured with polywave and single-peak LEDs. Methods: Experimental composites containing BisGMA, BisEMA, UDMA and TEGDMA as organic matrix were manipulated, with the camphorquinone/amine system as the initiator. For the inorganic filler, four different composites were investigated: only Br-Al-Si glass fillers (C1), Br-Al-Si glass/SiO2 90:10 (C2), Br-Al-Si glass/SiO2 80:20 (C3) and Br-Al-Si glass/SiO2 70:30 (C4). The viscosity evaluation was done by film thickness of the non-polymerized experimental composites between glass plates (n=4). For the push-out bond strength, cavities were made on the buccal surface of bovine teeth (n=10). After that, teeth were restored with each one of the experimental composites (C1-C4) and photocured by LEDs (Bluephase G2 – polywave or Radii-Cal – single-peak). The energy dose was standardized at 36 J. After 24 hours , specimens were tested using the Inston machine. Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey tests (α=0.05) . Results: the polywave and single-peak LEDs showed no difference for the bond strength values. However, C4 presented the higher bond strength values compared to C1 and C2. The composite C3 showed similar bond strength results compared to C4, C1 and C2 (p ≤ 0.001). The film thickness showed statistical differences in the decreasing way C4 > C3 > C2 > C1. Conclusions: The LED curing units did not influence the bond strength of the experimental composites. The higher the content of colloidal silica, higher the viscosity of the resin composite and push-out bond strength values.
    IADR General Session 2012; 06/2012
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To evaluate the effects of chemical agents on the removal of the smear layer and permeability in the primary root dentin. Method: Fifty primary roots were distributed in 6 groups: 5.25% Sodium Hypochlorite, 5.25% Sodium Hypochlorite + 17% EDTA, 2% Chlorhexidine, 2% Chlorhexidine + 17% EDTA, 17% EDTA, and Saline Solution. The canals were instrumented and irrigated. The roots were dyed, washed, sectioned and the permeability index was measured. The hemisections were prepared for scanning electron microscopy evaluation. The amount of smear layer was scored in: 1 = no smear layer; 2 = moderate smear layer; and 3 = heavy smear layer. Data were submitted to ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, Student-Newman-Keuls and t tests (p<.05). Result: Significant differences were observed for the cervical and apical thirds for the 2% Chlorhexidine (p=0.03), 2% Chlorhexidine + 17% EDTA (p=0.027), Saline Solution (p=0.038) and 5.25% Sodium Hypochlorite (p=0.0008) groups. The Saline Solution group showed heavy smear layer in all thirds. Root canals treated with 5.25% Sodium Hypochlorite + 17% EDTA showed great cleaning in the cervical, middle and apical thirds. Conclusion: Sodium hypochlorite associated with EDTA produces the best root canal cleaning and the highest permeability in all thirds for primary teeth.
    AADR Annual Meeting 2012; 03/2012
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To evaluate the clinical performance of two conventional glass-ionomer sealants in high caries risk children. Methods: Using a single-blind split-mouth randomized design, 413 sealants were applied on sound permanent first molars of 112 children (6-8 years old) after parental consent. Ketac Molar® (3M/ESPE) and Maxxion® (FGM) were applied respectively on 195 and 218 teeth by "press finger technique" in a school environment. Teeth were evaluated at 6-, 12-, 18-, 24-month intervals with regard to retention and caries development. The same calibrated dentist performed the baseline and follow-up examinations under natural light, using CPI probes and mirrors, after tooth brushing and gauze-drying (Kappa > 0.84). Clinical success was determined by the absence of caries development. Data was performed for survival analysis using Kaplan-Meier and Log-Rank Tests (p<0.05). Results: After 24 months, 284 (69%) sealants of 88 children were evaluated, 139 with Ketac Molar and 145 with Maxxion. There were 12% of Ketac Molar and 8% of Maxxion fully and partially retained sealants. Of the original sealed surfaces 78% of Ketac Molar and 87% of Maxxion were totally lost without caries development. While 10%of Ketac Molar and 5% of Maxxion were lost with caries development. There was no significant difference between the survival times for the two sealants (p = 0.46). The probability of cumulative survival rate was 99% (95% Confidential Interval = 97.9% - 100%) that was the same for both materials. Conclusions: The clinical performance of the two glass-ionomer sealants was considered satisfactory with a high preventive caries effect within 24 months. Although the sealants placed according to the ART approach showed low retention rates, this approach seems to be appropriate for high caries risk children.
    AADR Annual Meeting 2012; 03/2012
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of chemical agents on the permeability and removal of the smear layer in the primary root dentin. Fifty roots were distributed into 6 groups: (1) 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (SH); (2) 5.25% SH+17% ethylenedia-minetetraacetic acid (SHE); (3) 2% chlorhexidine (CHX); (4) 2% CHX+17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (CHXE); (5) 17% EDTA (E); and (6) saline solution (SS). The canals were instrumented and irrigated. The roots were dyed, washed, and sectioned, and the permeability index was measured. The amount of smear layer was scored. Data were submitted to analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis, Student-Newman-Keuls and t tests (P<.05). Significant differences were observed in the cervical and apical thirds for the CHX (P=.03), CHXE (P=.027), SS (P=.038), and SH (P<.001) groups. The SS group showed a heavy smear layer in all thirds. Root canals treated with SHE showed great cleaning in the cervical, middle, and apical thirds. Sodium hypochlorite associated with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid produces the best root canal cleaning and the highest permeability in all thirds.
    Pediatric dentistry. 01/2012; 34(4):e81-5.
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to assess Knoop hardness at different depths of a dual-cured self-adhesive resin cement through different thicknesses of Empress Esthetic® ceramic.Flattened bovine dentin was embedded in resin. The cement was inserted into a rubber mold (0.8 x 5 mm) that was placed between two polyvinyl chloride plastic films and placed over the flat dentin and light cured by Elipar Trilight-QTH (800 mW/cm2) or Ultra-Lumelight-emitting diode (LED 5; 1585 mW/cm2) over ceramic disks 1.4 or 2 mm thick. The specimens(n=6) were stored for 24 hours before Knoop hardness (KHN) was measured. The data were submitted to analysis of variance in a factorial split-plot design and Tukey's test (a=0.05).There was significant interaction among the study factors. In the groups cured by the QTHunit, an increase in ceramic thickness resulted in reduced cement hardness values at all depths, with the highest values always being found in the center (1.4 mm, 58.1; 2 mm, 50.1)and the lowest values at the bottom (1.4 mm,23.8; 2 mm, 20.2). When using the LED unit, the hardness values diminished with increased ceramic thickness only on the top (1.4 mm,51.5; 2 mm, 42.3). In the group with the 1.4-mm-thick disk, the LED curing unit resulted in similar values on the top (51.5) and center(51.9) and lower values on the bottom (24.2).However, when the cement was light cured through the 2-mm disk, the highest hardness value was obtained in the center (51.8), followed by the top (42.3) and bottom (19.9),results similar to those obtained with the QTH curing unit (center > top > bottom). The hardness values of the studied cement at different depths were dependent on the ceramic thickness but not on the light curing units used.
    Operative Dentistry 12/2011; 37(2):188-94. · 1.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to provide information regarding the marginal adaptation of composite resin onlays in primary teeth previously treated with 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) (pulp irrigant) using two different resin luting agents. Forty extracted sound primary molars had their crowns prepared in a standardized machine and were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=10): G1 (1% NaOCl irrigation+EnForce); G2 (EnForce); G3 (1% NaOCl irrigation+Rely X); G4 (Rely X). The onlays were made with Z250 composite resin on plaster models. After luting, the tooth/restoration set was stored in 100% relative humidity at 37ºC for 24 h and finished with Soflex discs. Caries Detector solution was applied at the tooth/restoration interface for 5 s. The specimens were washed and four digital photos of each tooth were then taken. The extents of the gaps were measured with Image Tool 3.0 software. The percentage data were submitted to a Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05). The Relative Risk test analyzed the chance of a gap presence correlated to each group. There were no statistically significant differences (p>0.05) among the groups. The relative risk test revealed that some groups were more apt to have a presence of gaps than others. Neither the 1% NaOCl treatment nor the resin luting agents caused any alterations in the dental substrate that could have influenced the marginal adaptation of composite onlays in primary teeth.
    Journal of applied oral science: revista FOB 10/2011; 19(5):455-61. · 0.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of resin sealer on enamel substrates after cariogenic challenge. Enamel blocks were obtained from human third molars and randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 10) according to enamel substrates (S: sound, CL: caries-like lesion, or CLTF: caries-like lesion + topical fluoride application) and sealant material (F: FluroShield, or H: Helioseal Clear Chroma). Sealants were placed on enamel surfaces, stored in 100% humidity (24 h, 37°C), and longitudinally sectioned into hourglass shapes. According to the groups, pH cycling was applied and the μTBS test was performed. The fracture patterns were assessed by SEM. Regarding substrates, the highest μTBS values in MPa were observed for CLTF enamel (26.0 ± 7.6), followed by S (22.0 ± 7.4) and CL (15.5 ± 4.9). A significant interaction was found between material and pH cycling (p = 0.0395). F (23.9 ± 7.6) showed higher μTBS values than H (18.3 ± 7.5) when submitted to pH cycling. The majority of samples presented mixed failure. Enamel substrate significantly affected μTBS, with the highest values for remineralized caries-like enamel lesions. Furthermore, μTBS values were dependent on both materials and pH cycling.
    The journal of adhesive dentistry 04/2011; 13(2):131-7. · 0.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: to evaluate by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier-transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman) and micro energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (-EDXRF), the impact of endodontic irrigation solutions, during in vitro endodontic treatment, on the chemical properties of pulp chamber permanent dentin. Methods: 30 permanent anterior extracted teeth were sectioned on mesial/distal direction, ground flat, exposing the pulp chamber, and divided into 6 groups (n=5): no treatment (NT); 2% gel chlorhexidine (CHX), 2% gel chlorhexidine + 17% EDTA (CHXE), 17% EDTA (E), 5.25% NaOCl (SH5); 5.25% NaOCl + 17% EDTA (SH5E). Irrigation was carried out by 30 min in all groups. The inorganic and organic dentin content was analyzed by FT- Raman. EDXRF examined calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), and calcium/phosphorus ratio. Impressions of the specimens were submitted to SEM evaluation. Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Results: FT-Raman analysis showed no difference regarding the inorganic and organic contents among experimental groups (p>0.05), whereas EDXRF analysis demonstrated significantly superior Ca and P values for SH5>NT=SH5E>CHX>E>CHXE. For ratio Ca/P content CHXE and E presented the highest Ca/P ratio values when compared to other groups (p<0.05). SEM observations revealed different morphological features for the experimental groups. Conclusions: it could be concluded that sodium hypochlorite irrigation used alone or associated with EDTA promoted lower chemical changes in the pulp chamber of permanent teeth. FAPESP supported ≠2005/58561-1.
    IADR General Session 2011; 03/2011
  • Dental Materials - DENT MATER. 01/2011; 27.
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the influence of NaOCl irrigation and water storage on the degradation and microstructure of the resin/dentin interface of primary teeth bonded with three different adhesive systems using the microtensile bond strength test (μTBS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Ninety sound primary molars were used. Eighteen groups were formed according to different adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond 2, SB; Clearfil Protect Bond, CP; Adper Prompt L-Pop, APL) with or without 0.5% NaOCl irrigation and water-storage time (24 h, 45 days, 90 days). The middle dentin was exposed. In the NaOCl group, NaOCl irrigation was performed for 30 min, and all groups were restored with composite (Charisma). Sticks with a 1-mm2 cross-sectional area were prepared for the μTBS test. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). The failure modes, presence or absence of resin tags, and the resin/ dentin interface were evaluated by SEM, and data were analyzed using Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel statistics (p < 0.05). The μTBS of APL was significantly lower than the other groups regardless of treatment and storage time. A significant decrease of μTBS values after 90 days of water storage occurred only in the non-NaOCl irrigation groups. After 90 days of storage, resin tags partially disappeared in APL and CP, and in SB, 100% of the resin tags remained. The choice of adhesive system is one of the factors when bonding to primary dentin is considered. In this study, the etch-and-rinse and the two-bottle self-etching adhesive system produced the highest μTBS values irrespective of prior NaOCl irrigation even up to 90 days of water storage.
    The journal of adhesive dentistry 09/2010; 13(3):213-20. · 0.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To evaluate the effect of fluoride- and non-fluoride-containing occlusal sealants on enamel mineral loss and marginal adaptation of different enamel substrates after a cariogenic challenge. Methods: Enamel blocks were obtained from human third molars, and randomly divided into 6 groups (n=10), according to enamel substrates (S-sound, C-caries-like lesion or CF-caries-like lesion + topical fluoride application) and sealant material (F-FluroShield or H-Helioseal Clear Chroma). Sealants were placed on occlusal surfaces, stored in 100% humidity (24 h-37C). All groups were subjected to in situ model. The Knoop hardness number values (KHN) were evaluated by cross-section microhardness analysis at the distances: -100 (interface sealant/enamel), 0 (sealant margin), 100, 200μm. Sealant marginal adaptation was scored according to: 0 - no sealant marginal adaptation or total sealant loss; 1 - sealant marginal adaptation present. The score 0 was considered as a failure, while score 1 as success and descriptive analyze was done. Data from mineral loss were analyzed by a mixed model analysis in repeated measures design. Results: For enamel mineral loss (DS) values of F (6900.53686.6) were significantly lower to that of H (8534.65375.3). Significant differences (DS) were observed among the distances from sealant margin -100 (5934.03282.6) < 0 (8701.56175.7) = 100 (8473.24299.4) = 200 (7761.54035.1). Sealant marginal adaptation on the sound enamel was similar for both materials. Considering CF and C substrate, F (60%/70%) demonstrated higher success rates than H (40%/30%). Conclusion: F provided lower mineral loss than H, regardless substrate and showed better marginal adaptation. However, considering the different distance from sealant margin, both materials can be used as a physical barrier to inhibit of enamel mineral loss.
    IADR General Session 2010; 07/2010
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    ABSTRACT: Irrigation solutions, endodontic auxiliary chemical substance, and chelating agents used on root canal treatment might yield changes in the chemical composition and physical properties of dentin surface and can affect its interaction with adhesive materials used for coronal sealing. Thus, studies are required to evaluate chemical agents, which have minimal effects on the mechanical properties of the tooth whilst achieving the desired debridement effect. Objectives: to verify the effects of endodontic irrigants, auxiliary chemical substances and chelating agent on the microhardness (Vickers Hardness test - VHN), roughness (Ra) and morphology (Scanning Electron Microscopy - SEM) of the pulp chamber dentin in primary and permanent teeth. Methods: Extracted 50 primary and 50 permanent anterior teeth were sectioned on mesial/distal sense, ground flat and divided into groups (n=5): saline (S); 1% NaOCl (H1); 1% NaOCl+hydrogen peroxide (H1P); 1% NaOCl and 17%EDTA (H1E); 17% EDTA (E); 2% chlorhexidine (C); 2% chlorhexidine and 17% EDTA (CE); 5.25% NaOCl (H5); 5.25% NaOCl and hydrogen peroxide (H5P); 5.25%NaOCl and 17%EDTA (H5E). Irrigation was carried out by 30 min in all groups. VHN was conducted using 3 indentation before and after treatment. Ra (m) and SEM analyses were conducted after treatment. Data were submitted to ANOVA, Bonferroni, paired t and Tukey tests(p<0.05). Results: VHN could not be measured in EDTA groups. H1 (11.5/21.5) and H5 (11.7/11.9) showed lower VHN for primary and permanent teeth than, respectively, C (20.5/19.6) and S (23.1/31.9). For primary teeth, H5E (2.3) showed the highest Ra values. For permanent teeth, H1E (1.3) and H5E (1.6) showed the highest Ra values. It was observed morphological alterations when H1E, H5E, E, C, CE were used. Conclusion: Irrigants, chelanting agents and auxiliaries substances used in root canal preparation, for permanent and primary teeth, provided decreased VHN values, increased Ra values and morphological alterations on dentin surface.
    AADR Annual Meeting 2010; 03/2010
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to perform a review of the effects of infiltrants and sealers on the inhibition of enamel demineralisation. The authors searched the Cochrane Library, Embase, PubMed and Web of Science (ISI) for papers published between January 1970 and September 2008. The main search terms were 'artificial caries' or 'caries treatment' or 'caries-like lesion' or 'white spot lesion' or 'enamel demineralisation' or 'natural caries' and 'enamel' and 'sealant' or 'resin infiltration'. The inclusion criteria were studies that produced artificial non-cavitated enamel lesions before the application of sealant in in vivo or in vitro studies. Studies excluded were those that had not produced artificial non-cavitated enamel lesions before the application of sealant; had evaluated the inhibition of enamel demineralisation around restorations, sealant and orthodontic bracket/bands; had not evaluated the inhibition of enamel demineralisation after the sealant application; and had not applied sealant materials. Selected papers were given scores, from A to C, according to predetermined criteria. Eighteen studies were identified and included in the project critical appraisal. Two papers were classified as Grade A, nine as Grade B and seven as Grade C. It can be concluded that while fissure sealing acts as a diffusion barrier on the top of the lesion surface, the infiltration technique creates a barrier inside the lesion by replacing the mineral lost with a low-viscosity light-curing resin.
    Oral health & preventive dentistry 01/2010; 8(3):295-305. · 0.52 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

64 Citations
25.37 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006–2014
    • University of Campinas
      • Faculty of Dentistry from Piracicaba
      Conceição de Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil
  • 2012
    • National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases
      Maryland, United States
  • 2011
    • University of São Paulo
      San Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil