S Dauvois

Laval University, Québec, Quebec, Canada

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Publications (29)147.42 Total impact

  • Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 12/2006; 586(1):174 - 187. · 4.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have characterized two distinct binding sites, called site 1 and site 2, in the nuclear protein RIP-140 which interact with the ligand binding domain of the estrogen receptor both in solution and when the receptor is bound to DNA. Both sites are capable of independently interacting with other nuclear receptors, including the thyroid hormone and retinoic acid receptors, but they are not identical since the interaction with retinoid X receptor is mediated primarily by site 1. The interaction is enhanced by agonists but not by antagonists, and the in vitro binding activities to a number of mutant receptors correlate with their abilities to stimulate transcription in vivo. When RIP-140 is fused to heterologous DNA binding domains, it is able to stimulate the transcription of reporter genes in both yeast and mammalian cells. Thus, RIP-140 is likely to function as a bridging protein between receptors and the basal transcription machinery and thereby stimulate the transcription of target genes.
    Molecular and Cellular Biology 12/1996; 16(11):6029-36. · 5.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: MCF-7 human breast cancer cells express functional estrogen receptor and grow in response to estrogen stimulation. G(1)-synchronized MCF-7 cells, made quiescent by exposure to the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor Simvastatin in estrogen-free medium, readily resume cell cycle progression upon stimulation with 17beta-estradiol (E(2)), even under conditions where polypeptide growth factor-triggered signal transduction pathways are inhibited by the continuous presence of Simvastatin in the culture medium. Under these conditions, cyclin D(1) gene transcription is transiently induced within the first 1-9 h of stimulation, as shown by the accumulation of cyclin D(1) mRNA and protein (p36(D(1))) in the cell and by enhanced expression of stably transfected D(1) promoter-luciferase hybrid genes. Estrogen-induced p36(D(1)) associates readily with p32(cdk2) and p34(cdk4), but not with p31(cdk5), which is however abundantly expressed in these cells. Only p36(D(1))-p34(cdk4) complexes are activated by E(2), as detected in cell extracts by immunoprecipitation with anti-D(1) antibodies followed by assessment of phosphotransferase activity toward the retinoblastoma (Rb) gene product and by analysis of p105(Rb) phosphorylation in vivo. An estrogen-responsive regulatory region has been mapped within the first 944 bp upstream of the transcriptional startsite of the human D(1) gene. Sequence analysis of this DNA region reveals that the cis-acting elements responsive to estrogen are likely to be different in this case from the canonical EREs.
    Oncogene 07/1996; 12(11):2315-24. · 7.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A conserved region in the hormone-dependent activation domain AF2 of nuclear receptors plays an important role in transcriptional activation. We have characterized a novel nuclear protein, RIP140, that specifically interacts in vitro with this domain of the estrogen receptor. This interaction was increased by estrogen, but not by anti-estrogens and the in vitro binding capacity of mutant receptors correlates with their ability to stimulate transcription. RIP140 also interacts with estrogen receptor in intact cells and modulates its transcriptional activity in the presence of estrogen, but not the anti-estrogen 4-hydroxytamoxifen. In view of its widespread expression in mammalian cells, RIP140 may interact with other members of the superfamily of nuclear receptors and thereby act as a potential co-activator of hormone-regulated gene transcription.
    The EMBO Journal 09/1995; 14(15):3741-51. · 9.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The estrogen receptor (ER) stimulates transcription of target genes by means of its two transcriptional activation domains, AF-1 in the N-terminal part of the receptor and AF-2 in its ligand-binding domain. AF-2 activity is dependent upon a putative amphipathic alpha-helix between residues 538 and 552 in the mouse ER. Point mutagenesis of conserved hydrophobic residues within this region reduces estrogen-dependent transcriptional activation without affecting hormone and DNA binding significantly. Here we show that these mutations dramatically alter the pharmacology of estrogen antagonists. Both tamoxifen and ICI 164,384 behave as strong agonists in HeLa cells expressing the ER mutants. In contrast to the wild-type ER, the mutant receptors maintain nuclear localization and DNA-binding activity after ICI 164,384 treatment. Structural alterations in AF-2 caused by gene mutations such as those described herein or by estrogen-independent signaling pathways may account for the insensitivity of some breast cancers to tamoxifen treatment.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 06/1995; 92(10):4206-10. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The ligand binding domain of the estrogen receptor contains a hormone-dependent transcriptional activation function. To investigate the mechanism by which it stimulates transcription, we have expressed fusion proteins containing either the wild-type or a transcriptionally defective form of this domain fused to glutathione-S-transferase and searched for proteins that specifically interact in vitro. By far-Western blotting, three proteins of 160, 140, and 80 kDa expressed in different mammalian cells (HeLa, ZR75-1, and COS-1) were shown to associate directly with the wild-type receptor in the presence of estrogen. Two additional proteins appeared to interact indirectly with the hormone binding domain since they were detected only by a pull-down assay. All of these interactions were abolished by antiestrogens, such as 4-hydroxytamoxifen, ICI 164384, or ICI 182780, which inhibit hormone-dependent transcription. Moreover, they were not observed with the transcriptionally defective form of the receptor even in the presence of estrogen. Thus, since the ability of these proteins to interact with the hormone binding domain correlates with its transcriptional activity, one or more of them may contribute to hormone-dependent transcriptional activation by the estrogen receptor.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 11/1994; 91(21):10009-13. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Whether the same or distinct steroid sulphatases (STS) are involved in the hydrolysis of alkyl and aryl steroid sulphates remains controversial. We have examined the ability of a placental steroid sulphatase to hydrolyse oestrone sulphate and/or dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHA-S) by expressing the enzyme in COS-1 cells. Using either intact cells or broken cell preparations, the expressed sulphatase was found to hydrolyse both oestrone sulphate and DHA-S. The catalysis of oestrone sulphate and DHA-S by the expressed sulphatase was almost completely abolished by the steroid sulphatase inhibitor, oestrone-3-O-sulphamate. It is concluded that both alkyl and aryl steroid sulphates can be hydrolysed by the same steroid sulphatase.
    The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 08/1994; 50(1-2):101-4. · 3.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Estradiol (E2) is well known as stimulator of the growth of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced mammary tumors. The effect of estrone (E1), however, has not been described in this model of human breast cancer. As E1 is the predominant estrogen precursor in postmenopausal women, we have investigated the effect of this steroid and, simultaneously, the potential role of the enzyme required for interconversion of the weak estrogen E1 into the potent estrogen E2, namely 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, in the growth of DMBA-induced mammary carcinoma in the rat. Treatment for 20 days of ovariectomized animals bearing DMBA-induced mammary tumors with twice daily doses of 0.375, 0.75, 1.5, and 3.0 micrograms E1 increased total tumor area by 48%, 101%, 116%, and 129%, respectively. Treatment with the highest dose of E1 increased progesterone receptor levels by 20.4- and 2.3-fold in the DMBA-induced tumors and uterus, respectively. After treatment with E1, the concentration of this steroid was similar in the serum and tumor tissue, whereas concentrations of E2 were approximately 3-fold higher in the tumor tissue compared to serum. Treatment with a 1.0-microgram dose of E1 caused a 60% increase in tumoral 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in ovariectomized animals, thus favoring E2 formation from E1 in tumors. In addition, treatment with the 1.0-microgram dose of E1 or 0.1 microgram E2 gave similar stimulatory effects on tumor growth and uterine weight in ovariectomized animals; the values were comparable to those found in intact animals. The present data indicate that ovariectomized rats bearing DMBA-induced mammary tumors and treated with E1 can be a useful model of postmenopausal breast cancer.
    Endocrinology 04/1994; 134(3):1352-7. · 4.72 Impact Factor
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    S Dauvois, R White, M G Parker
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    ABSTRACT: The mouse estrogen receptor was shown to be constantly shuttling between the nucleus and cytoplasm although under steady-state conditions it is detected predominantly in the cell nucleus in both the absence and presence of estradiol. Shuttling was demonstrated by monitoring the transfer of protein between nuclei in heterokaryons and by examining the subcellular distribution of mutant receptors. In the presence of the partial antiestrogen 4-hydroxytamoxifen the receptor was retained in the nucleus whereas it accumulated in the cytoplasm when cells were treated with the pure antiestrogen ICI 182780. The effect of the pure antiestrogen was to inhibit nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of the receptor by blocking its nuclear uptake. Thus although ligand binding is not required by the estrogen receptor to undergo nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, this process can be disrupted by the binding of a pure antiestrogen.
    Journal of Cell Science 01/1994; 106 ( Pt 4):1377-88. · 5.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The hormone binding domain of the estrogen receptor is required not only for binding estradiol but also to form stable homodimers of the protein and mediate transcriptional activation by the receptor. Residues that are essential for estrogen binding are also involved in dimerization, suggesting that the hormone-binding pocket is at or near the dimer interface. Distinct hydrophobic and charged residues are essential for hormone-dependent transcriptional activation, and these appear to be conserved by other members of the nuclear receptor family. We have found that the pure antiestrogens ICI 164384 and ICI 182780 increase the turnover of the receptor compared with that in the presence of estradiol. Because it is likely that the pure antiestrogens bind to a similar region of the receptor as that of estradiol, we propose that they inhibit receptor dimerization by means of their 7 alpha alkyl-amide extension. It appears that as a consequence nuclear uptake is inhibited and the receptor more rapidly degraded in the cytoplasm.
    Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 07/1993; 684:119-26. · 4.38 Impact Factor
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    N D Arbuckle, S Dauvois, M G Parker
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    ABSTRACT: We have investigated the effect of a series of steroidal oestrogen antagonists, related to ICI 164,384, on the DNA binding activity of mouse oestrogen receptors expressed in insect cells. The analogues possess different side chains at the 7-position of the B ring in the steroid. Inhibition was observed when the length of the side-chain was 15-16 carbon atoms but not 10 or 20 carbon atoms and only when the 7 alpha isomer was used. The DNA binding activity of receptors expressed in COS-1 cells was also inhibited after extended periods of incubation with antioestrogens but not that of the human receptor in breast cancer cell-extracts. We have proposed that ICI 164,384 might disrupt receptor dimerisation, and therefore the variation in its ability to inhibit DNA binding activity may reflect differences in dimer stability. Since the DNA binding activity of in vitro translated receptors was inhibited when they were translated in the presence of the antioestrogen we suggest that ICI 164,384 might prevent the formation of receptor dimers without necessarily being able to disrupt preformed dimers.
    Nucleic Acids Research 09/1992; 20(15):3839-44. · 8.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The ability of estrogens to stimulate the transcriptional activity of the estrogen receptor can be inhibited by a diverse range of estrogen antagonists. Here we show that the antiestrogen ICI 164,384, N-(n-butyl)-11-[3,17 beta-dihydroxy-estra-1,3,5(10)-trien-7 alpha-yl]N-methylundecanamide, rapidly reduces the levels of receptor protein transiently expressed in cells without affecting receptor mRNA abundance. The reduction in the levels of receptor protein is dose dependent, reversible by estradiol, and mediated by the hormone-binding domain of the receptor. Pulse-chase experiments indicate that the half-life of the receptor is reduced from approximately 5 hr in the presence of estradiol to less than 1 hr by ICI 164,384. A similar reduction in estrogen receptor levels is demonstrated in human breast cancer cells treated with ICI 164,384. We discuss the possibility that the increased turnover of the receptor might be a consequence of impaired receptor dimerization.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 06/1992; 89(9):4037-41. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    R Roy, S Dauvois, F Labrie, A Belanger
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    ABSTRACT: The non-aromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT) has been shown to exert a potent inhibitory effect on the proliferation of some human breast cancer cell lines. DHT, however, has little or no significant inhibition on MCF-7 cell proliferation in either the presence or absence of estradiol (E2). Since the metabolism of DHT into non-active compounds may be responsible for the observed lack of androgenic effect in this cell line, we have investigated the metabolic fate of labeled DHT in MCF-7 cells. A time course incubation was performed with 1 nM [3H]DHT and analysis of the various metabolites formed revealed a time-dependent increase in glucuronidated steroids which was stimulated more than 4-fold by 0.1 nM E2. The major glucuronidated steroid was androstane-3 alpha, 17 beta-diol in both control and E2-stimulated cells, comprising 22 +/- 1.2% and 30 +/- 0.6% of the total radioactivity in the medium, respectively. Other steroid glucuronides observed included DHT, androstane-3 beta,17 beta-diol, and androsterone, all of which were elevated in the E2-treated cells relative to control values. The present data show that E2 exerts a stimulatory effect on the glucuronidation of androgens and their metabolites in the estrogen-dependent breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Since glucuronidation is an effective means of cellular elimination of active steroids, such a pathway may be considered as a possible site of regulation of breast cancer cell growth by hormones.
    The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 04/1992; 41(3-8):579-82. · 3.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have recently demonstrated that physiological levels of androgens exert direct and potent inhibitory effects on the growth of human breast cancer ZR-75-1 cells in vivo in nude mice as well as in vitro under both basal and estrogen-stimulated conditions. The inhibitory effect of androgens has also been confirmed on the growth of dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced mammary carcinoma in the rat. Such observations are in close agreement with the clinical data showing that androgens and the androgenic compound medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) have beneficial effects in breast cancer in women comparable to other endocrine therapies, including tamoxifen. Although the inhibitory action of androgens on cell proliferation in estrogen-induced ZR-75-1 cells results, in part, from their suppressive effect on expression of the estrogen receptor, the androgens also exert a direct inhibitory effect independent of estrogens. Androgens cause a global slowing effect on the duration of the cell cycle. These observations support clinical data showing that androgenic compounds induce an objective remission after failure of antiestrogen therapy as well as those indicating that the antiproliferative action of androgens is additive to that of antiestrogens. We have also recently demonstrated in ZR-75-1 human breast cancer cells the antagonism between androgens and estrogens on the expression of GCDFP-15 and GCDFP-24 which are two major proteins secreted in human gross cystic disease fluid. The effects of androgens and estrogens as well as those of progestins and glucocorticoids on GCDFP-15 and GCDFP-24 mRNA levels and secretion are opposite to those induced by the same steroids on cell growth in ZR-75-1 cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
    Cancer Detection and Prevention 02/1992; 16(1):31-8. · 2.52 Impact Factor
  • N.D. Arbuckle, S Dauvois, M. Parker
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    ABSTRACT: Nucleic Acids Research, 20, pp. 3839–3844 (1992) Please note that there is an error in the name of one of the antioestrogens, ICI 165, 889. This should read: ICI 165, 889: N- n -butyl-8-(3, 17β-dihydroxyoestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-7α-yl)-pentanamide.
    01/1992;
  • R ROY, S DAUVOIS, F LABRIE, A BELANGER
    Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology - J STEROID BIOCHEM MOL BIOL. 01/1992; 41:579-582.
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    ABSTRACT: The effects of the androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and of the androgenic steroid medroxyprogesterone acetate were studied on the growth of human ZR-75-1 breast carcinoma in athymic mice. The possibility of additive inhibitory effects of DHT and the new steroidal antiestrogen N-n-butyl, N-methyl-11-[16' alpha-chloro-3',17' alpha-dihydroxyestra-1',3',5'(10')trien-7' alpha-yl]undecanamide (EM-170) was also investigated on tumor growth. Removal of the high dose 17 beta-estradiol (E2) implants used to optimally stimulate initial ZR-75-1 tumor development in ovariectomized mice led to a progressive decrease in tumor area to 50.2 +/- 8% (SEM) of original tumor size 40 days after E2 deprivation. Additional treatment with the androgen DHT led to a more rapid fall in tumor volume, which already reached 57% of pretreatment values at 11 days. Whereas physiological implants of E2 led to a progressive increase in tumor size to about 180% above original size after 40 days, physiological plasma levels (205 +/- 37.2 pg/ml or approximately 0.67 nM) of DHT completely reversed the stimulatory effect of E2. Similar inhibitory effects on E2-stimulated tumor growth were achieved with the synthetic androgenic steroid medroxyprogesterone acetate. When the steroidal antiestrogen EM-170 at the dose of 30 micrograms/day was used simultaneously with DHT, tumor area was further reduced from 99.0 +/- 9.5% (DHT alone) to 58.8 +/- 18% when both DHT and EM-170 were administered together for 40 days compared with 169 +/- 22.2% in control E2-stimulated animals. The present data show that the androgen DHT as well as medroxy-progesterone acetate are potent inhibitors of E2-stimulated human ZR-75-1 breast cancer cell growth in vivo. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of DHT can be further increased by addition of the antiestrogen EM-170, thus suggesting the interest of combining these 2 classes of compounds acting, at least partially, through different mechanisms, in order to improve breast cancer therapy in women.
    Cancer Research 07/1991; 51(12):3131-5. · 8.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have investigated the effects of the pure antiestrogen EM-139 and the nonaromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT) alone or in combination with estradiol (E2) on cell proliferation and cell kinetic parameters in human ZR-75-1 breast cancer cells. Following a 24- to 30-h exposure to E2, a decrease in the proportion of G0-G1 cells was observed, this effect being accompanied by the well-known stimulatory effect of the estrogen on cell proliferation at later time intervals. By contrast, DHT or EM-139 alone inhibited basal cell proliferation without a significant influence on cell cycle distribution. Moreover, pretreatment with DHT for 8 days, while decreasing ZR-75-1 cell number, did not cause a loss in E2 sensitivity. In fact, as early as after 24 h of E2 treatment, a decrease in the G0-G1 cell fraction accompanied by a corresponding increase of the S-phase was observed in both control and DHT-pretreated cells. When added concomitantly with E2, DHT or EM-139 inhibited the E2 stimulatory effect on cell proliferation, but only EM-139 significantly reversed the G0-G1 decrease induced by E2. Although DHT and EM-139 did not affect the distribution of ZR-75-1 cells between the different phases of the cell cycle, continuous labeling with 5'-bromodeoxyuridine showed that EM-139 and DHT had a global slowing effect on the duration of the cell cycle, thus explaining the potent inhibitory effect of these compounds on cell proliferation. The present data demonstrate that DHT and EM-139 are both potent inhibitors of the stimulatory effect on E2 on cell proliferation, their main action being related to a general increase in the duration of the cell cycle.
    Cancer Research 07/1991; 51(11):2797-802. · 8.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have recently demonstrated that physiological concentrations of androgens cause a marked inhibition of basal and 17β-estradiol (E2)-induced cell growth in ZR-75-1 human breast cancer cells. Moreover, these steroids exert effects on GCDFP-15 (gross cystic disease fluid protein-15) expression that are opposite to their above-indicated actions on cell proliferation. The synthetic progestin R5020 (17,21-dimethyl-19-nor-4,9-pregnadiene-3,20-dione), on the other hand, causes a potent inhibition of E2-induced ZR-75-1 cell growth. In order to further characterize the hormonal regulation of GCDFP-15 expression and to better understand the antagonism between progestin and estrogen action in breast cancer cells, we have studied the effect of R5020 on both GCDFP-15 expression and cell growth in ZR-75-1 cells. After a 10-day incubation, the 4-fold stimulatory effect of 1 nM E2 on cell growth was 60% decreased by maximal effective concentrations of R5020 (> 1 nM) while, in the absence of E2, R5020 had no effect. The mitogenic action of E2 was accompanied by a 75% inhibition of GCDFP-15 secretion while nanomolar concentrations of R5020 induced 1.4- and 5.2-fold increases in GCDFP-15 secretion in control and E2-treated ZR-75-1 cells, respectively. While E2 caused a marked inhibition of GCDFP-15 mRNA levels, R5020 induced a maximal 2- to 3-fold increase (above control) in GCDFP-15 mRNA accumulation in cells simultaneously incubated with E2. In the presence of E2, the effect of R5020 on cell growth and GCDFP-15 secretion was 70–90% blocked by concomitant exposure to the antihormone RU486 while simultaneous exposure to the pure antiandrogen OH-flutamide exerted a small but significant interference with the antiestrogenic effect of R5020 on these two parameters. The present data show that in the presence of E2, R5020 exerts a potent stimulatory effect on GCDFP-15 expression which is primarily mediated through specific interaction with the progesterone receptor with a minor role of the androgen receptor. In analogy with our previous observations with androgens and estrogens, the effects of the progestin R5020 on GCDFP-15 expression are opposite to their action on cell growth. Such data also suggest that the glycoprotein GCDFP-15 could well be a good biochemical marker to follow the response to androgens and/or progestins as well as antiestrogens in the therapy of advanced breast cancer.
    Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology 11/1990; · 4.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have previously demonstrated that androgens are potent inhibitors of breast cancer cell proliferation under both basal and estrogen-induced incubation conditions, while they suppress expression of the estrogen and progesterone receptors. To better understand the mechanisms responsible for the antagonism between androgens and estrogens in breast cancer and to obtain a new tumor marker for the actions of these two steroids, we have investigated the effects of androgens and estrogens on expression of the major protein found in human breast gross cystic disease fluid, namely GCDFP-24. This study was performed in ZR-75-1 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. After a 9-day incubation period, physiological concentrations of 17 beta-estradiol stimulated proliferation of ZR-75-1 and MCF-7 cells by 2- to 3.5-fold while simultaneously exerting a marked 70-90% inhibition of GCDFP-24 secretion. The estrogenic effects on GCDFP-24 secretion and cell proliferation were both competitively blocked by simultaneous incubation with the new steroidal pure antiestrogen EM-139. On the other hand, a maximal concentration (10 nM) of the nonaromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone decreased by 50% the proliferation of ZR-75-1 cells; the half-maximal inhibitory effect was exerted at 0.01 nM. The androgen exerted a 3- to 4-fold stimulatory effect on GCDFP-24 secretion at an EC50 value of 0.01 nM. The effect of dihydrotestosterone on these parameters was competitively blocked by simultaneous incubation with the pure antiandrogen OH-flutamide. The present data show that the effects of estrogens and androgens in ZR-75-1 cells on GCDFP-24 secretion and cell growth are opposite. Similarly, in MCF-7 cells, estrogens stimulate cell growth, while GCDFP-24 secretion is inhibited. The present data also suggest that GCDFP-24 could well be a good biochemical marker for monitoring the response to androgenic and antiestrogenic compounds in the therapy of advanced breast cancer.
    Endocrinology 07/1990; 126(6):3223-31. · 4.72 Impact Factor