Carlos V Serrano

Instituto do Coração, San Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

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Publications (74)276.55 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Low plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) are typical of acute myocardial infarction (MI) and predict risk of recurrent cardiovascular events. The potential relationships between modifications in the molecular composition and the functionality of HDL subpopulations in acute MI however remain indeterminate. and Results ST segment elevation MI (STEMI) patients were recruited within 24h after diagnosis (n=16) and featured low HDL-C (-31%, p<0.05) and acute-phase inflammation (determined as marked elevations in C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A (SAA) and interleukin-6) as compared to age- and sex-matched controls (n=10). STEMI plasma HDL and its subpopulations (HDL2b, 2a, 3a, 3b, 3c) displayed attenuated cholesterol efflux capacity from THP-1 cells (up to -32%, p<0.01, on a unit phospholipid mass basis) vs. Plasma HDL and small, dense HDL3b and 3c subpopulations from STEMI patients exhibited reduced anti-oxidative activity (up to -68%, p<0.05, on a unit HDL mass basis). HDL subpopulations in STEMI were enriched in two proinflammatory bioactive lipids, lysophosphatidylcholine (up to 3.0-fold, p<0.05) and phosphatidic acid (up to 8.4-fold, p<0.05), depleted in apolipoprotein A-I (up to -23%, p<0.05) and enriched in SAA (up to +10.2-fold, p<0.05); such changes were most marked in the HDL3b subfraction. In vitro HDL enrichment in both lysophosphatidylcholine and phosphatidic acid exerted deleterious effects on HDL functionality. In the early phase of STEMI, HDL particle subpopulations display marked, concomitant alterations in both lipidome and proteome which are implicated in impaired HDL functionality. Such modifications may act synergistically to confer novel deleterious biological activities to STEMI HDL. Our present data highlight complex changes in the molecular composition and functionality of HDL particle subpopulations in the acute phase of STEMI, and for the first time, reveal that concomitant modifications in both the lipidome and proteome contribute to functional deficiencies in cholesterol efflux and antioxidative activities of HDL particles. These findings may provide new biomarkers and new insights in therapeutic strategy to reduce cardiovascular risk in this clinical setting where such net deficiency in HDL function, mutiplied by low circulating HDL concentrations, can be expected to contribute to accelerated atherogenesis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 05/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.bbalip.2015.05.007 · 4.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Elevated B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels following acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are associated with adverse outcomes. The role of serial BNP monitoring after AMI has been poorly investigated. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of in-hospital serial BNP measurements in AMI patients. Patients with AMI (n = 1,924) were retrospectively evaluated. We selected patients with at least 2 in-hospital BNP measurements. The association between in-hospital mortality and BNP measurements (earliest, highest follow-up and the variation between measurements) were tested in multivariate models. Serial BNP levels were determined in 176 patients. Compared to the rest of the population, these patients were older and had higher mortality rates. In the adjusted models, only the highest follow-up BNP remained associated with in-hospital death (odds ratio 1.06; 95% confidence interval, CI, 1.01-1.15; p = 0.014). Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated that the highest follow-up BNP was the best predictor of in-hospital death (area under the curve = 0.75; 95% CI 0.64-0.86). Serial BNP monitoring was performed in a high-risk subgroup of AMI patients. The highest follow-up BNP was a better predictor of short-term death than the baseline and in-hospital variation values. In AMI patients, a later in-hospital BNP assessment may be more useful than an early measurement. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.
    Cardiology 04/2015; 131(2):116-121. DOI:10.1159/000375398 · 2.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate functional and compositional properties of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in subjects from a kindred of genetic apolipoprotein (apo) A-I deficiency, two homozygotes and six heterozygotes, with a nonsense mutation at APOA1 codon -2, Q[-2]X, were recruited together with age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n=11). Homozygotes displayed undetectable plasma levels of apoA-I and reduced levels of HDL-cholesterol and apoC-III (5.4% and 42.6% of controls, respectively). Heterozygotes displayed low HDL-cholesterol (21+/-9 mg/dl), low apoA-I (79+/-24 mg/dl), normal low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (132+/-25 mg/dl) and elevated triglyceride (130+/-45 mg/dl) levels. Cholesterol efflux capacity of ultracentrigufally-isolated HDL subpopulations was reduced (up to -25%, p<0.01, on a phospholipid basis) in heterozygotes vs. controls. Small, dense HDL3 and total HDL from heterozygotes exhibited diminished antioxidative activity (up to -48%, p<0.001 on a total mass basis) vs. controls. HDL subpopulations from both homozygotes and heterozygotes displayed altered chemical composition, with depletion in apoA-I, phospholipid and cholesteryl ester, enrichment in apoA-II, free cholesterol and triglyceride, and altered phosphosphingolipidome. The defective atheroprotective activities of HDL were correlated with altered lipid and apolipoprotein composition. These data reveal that atheroprotective activities of HDL particles are impaired in homozygous and heterozygous apoA-I deficiency and are intimately related to marked alterations in protein and lipid composition.
    The Journal of Lipid Research 10/2014; 55(12). DOI:10.1194/jlr.M051631 · 4.73 Impact Factor
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    Atherosclerosis 08/2014; 235(2):e299. DOI:10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2014.05.902 · 3.97 Impact Factor
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    Arquivos brasileiros de cardiologia 03/2014; 102(2):e17. DOI:10.5935/abc.20140017 · 1.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Assuming that coronary interventions, both coronary bypass surgery (CABG) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), are directed to preserve left ventricular function, it is not known whether medical therapy alone (MT) can achieve this protection. Thus, we evaluated the evolution of LV ejection fraction (LVEF) in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) treated by CABG, PCI, or MT as a post hoc analysis of a randomized controlled trial with a follow-up of 10 years. Left ventricle ejection fraction was assessed with transthoracic echocardiography in patients with multivessel CAD, participants of the MASS II trial before randomization to CABG, PCI, or MT, and re-evaluated after 10 years of follow-up. Of the 611 patients, 422 were alive after 10.32 ± 1.43 years. Three hundred and fifty had LVEF reassessed: 108 patients from MT, 111 from CABG, and 131 from PCI. There was no difference in LVEF at the beginning (0.61 ± 0.07, 0.61 ± 0.08, 0.61 ± 0.09, respectively, for PCI, CABG, and MT, P = 0.675) or at the end of follow-up (0.56 ± 0.11, 0.55 ± 0.11, 0.55 ± 0.12, P = 0.675), or in the decline of LVEF (reduction delta of -7.2 ± 17.13, -9.08 ± 18.77, and -7.54 ± 22.74). Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) during the follow-up was associated with greater reduction in LVEF. The presence of previous AMI (OR: 2.50, 95% CI: 1.40-4.45; P = 0.0007) and during the follow-up (OR: 2.73, 95% CI: 1.25-5.92; P = 0.005) was associated with development of LVEF <45%. Regardless of the therapeutic option applied, LVEF remains preserved in the absence of a major adverse cardiac event after 10 years of follow-up. http://www.controlled-trials.com. Registration number ISRCTN66068876.
    European Heart Journal 07/2013; DOI:10.1093/eurheartj/eht201 · 14.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) should be treated with statins to attain very low cholesterol levels, in order to reduce cardiovascular adverse events. More than 70% of these patients do not reach the appropriate cholesterol goal despite moderate statin doses. However, it is not known whether therapeutic uptitration with different lipid-lowering strategies has a similar "pleiotropic" effect on atherosclerotic endothelial dysfunction evaluated by measurement of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs).Objective We sought to compare, in patients with stable CAD and with a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) >70 mg/dL on treatment with simvastatin 20 mg, the effects on EPCs by increasing simvastatin to 80 mg versus adding ezetimibe 10 mg.Methods Patients (n = 68, 63 ± 9 years, 39% men) were randomly allocated to receive ezetimibe 10/simvastatin 20 mg or simvastatin 80 mg for 6 weeks. Circulating EPCs were measured by flow cytometry before and after the treatment.ResultsBoth strategies presented similar effects on metabolic parameters. The LDLs were equally reduced by ezetimibe 10/simvastatin 20 mg and simvastatin 80 mg (28.9% ± 13% vs 21.1% ± 33%; P = .46, respectively). The levels of EPCs were unaffected by ezetimibe 10/simvastatin 20 mg (median [25th, 75th]: pre- vs posttreatment, 7.0 [2.3; 13.3] vs 3.1 [0.1; 13.2] EPCs/10(4) mononuclear cells; P = .43) or simvastatin 80 mg (pre- vs posttreatment, 6.1 [2.9; 15.2] vs 4.0 [1.4; 10.7] EPCs/10(4) mononuclear cells; P = .5) ,and there were no differences between the groups on treatment effects (P = .9).Conclusions Among stable patients with CAD and with an LDL-C >70 mg/dL on simvastatin 20 mg, increasing simvastatin dose to 80 mg or adding ezetimibe 10 mg promoted similar further cholesterol reduction but did not have incremental effects on circulating EPCs. These data suggest that the effects of simvastatin moderate doses on EPCs are not increased by intensive lipid-lowering strategies (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00474123).
    Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics 06/2013; 18(5). DOI:10.1177/1074248413489771 · 3.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective. Evaluate if statin therapy prior to elective coronary stent implantation (CSI) reduces the plasma levels of markers of inflammation and of myocardial necrosis in low-risk stable coronary artery disease patients (CAD). Background. The elevation of markers of inflammation and of myocardial necrosis after percutaneous coronary intervention may interfere with clinical outcome. Among acute coronary syndrome patients, statins improve clinical outcomes when used before CSI - mostly due to reduction of CSI-related myocardial infarction. However, little is known concerning preprocedural statin therapy on the reduction of these markers in stable patients at low-risk. Methods. In this prospective, observational study, 100 patients (n=50 on statin therapy vs n=50 not on statin) with stable coronary artery disease underwent elective CSI. Inflammatory (C-reactive protein [CRP], interleukin [IL]-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and matrix metalloproteinase-9) and myocardial necrosis markers (troponin I and CK-MB) were determined before and 24 hours after CSI. Results. All patients presented a significant increase of CRP and IL-6 after CSI. However, this increase was attenuated in patients on statin therapy prior to CSI than those without statin therapy: 75% vs 150% (p<0.001) and 192% vs 300% (p<0.01). The other pro-inflammatory markers were similar for both sets of patients. Troponin I and CK-MB did not change after CSI regardless of previous statin therapy or not. Conclusions. Pretreatment with statin attenuates procedural inflammation, denoted by markedly lower increases of CRP and IL-6 levels, in elective CSI within low-risk stable CAD patients. Periprocedural myocardial injury was irrelevant and was not affected by preprocedural statin therapy in this population. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 04/2013; DOI:10.1002/ccd.24937 · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Monitoring of disease activity and the best therapeutic approach are a challenge in Takayasu arteritis (TA). When associated with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), the best interventional treatment has not been established. The objective of this study was to describe the baseline characteristics, clinical manifestations, treatment and long-term outcome of patients with TA and ACS. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed eight patients between 2004 and 2010. The following data were obtained: age, gender, clinical and electrocardiographic manifestations, Killip class, risk factors for ACS, markers of myocardial necrosis (CK-MB and troponin), creatinine clearance, left ventricular ejection fraction, inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate [ESR]), medication during hospital stay, angiographic findings, treatment (medical, percutaneous or surgical) and long-term outcome. Statistical data were expressed as percentages and absolute values. RESULTS: All eight patients were women, median age 49 years. Typical chest pain was present in 37.5%. Elevated ESR was observed in 85.7%. Three patients underwent coronary artery bypass grafting, three underwent percutaneous coronary angioplasty (two with bare-metal stents and one with a drug-eluting stent) and two were treated medically. In-hospital mortality was 25%. There were no deaths during a mean follow-up of 30 months. CONCLUSIONS: In our study, patients who were discharged home had good outcomes in long-term follow-up with medical, percutaneous or surgical treatment. ESR appears to be associated with ACS in TA.
    Revista portuguesa de cardiologia: orgao oficial da Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia = Portuguese journal of cardiology: an official journal of the Portuguese Society of Cardiology 03/2013; 32(4). DOI:10.1016/j.repce.2012.06.007 · 0.53 Impact Factor
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    Journal of the American College of Cardiology 03/2013; 61(10). DOI:10.1016/S0735-1097(13)60933-X · 15.34 Impact Factor
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    Journal of the American College of Cardiology 03/2013; 61(10). DOI:10.1016/S0735-1097(13)61218-8 · 15.34 Impact Factor
  • World Journal of AIDS 01/2013; 03(03):207-215. DOI:10.4236/wja.2013.33028
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    Clinics (São Paulo, Brazil) 09/2012; 67(9):1117-21. DOI:10.6061/clinics/2012(09)21 · 1.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Although the release of cardiac biomarkers after percutaneous (PCI) or surgical revascularization (CABG) is common, its prognostic significance is not known. Questions remain about the mechanisms and degree of correlation between the release, the volume of myocardial tissue loss, and the long-term significance. Delayed-enhancement of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) consistently quantifies areas of irreversible myocardial injury. To investigate the quantitative relationship between irreversible injury and cardiac biomarkers, we will evaluate the extent of irreversible injury in patients undergoing PCI and CABG and relate it to postprocedural modifications in cardiac biomarkers and long-term prognosis. METHODS/DESIGN: The study will include 150 patients with multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD) with left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) and a formal indication for CABG; 50 patients will undergo CABG with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB); 50 patients with the same arterial and ventricular condition indicated for myocardial revascularization will undergo CABG without CPB; and another 50 patients with CAD and preserved ventricular function will undergo PCI using stents. All patients will undergo CMR before and after surgery or PCI. We will also evaluate the release of cardiac markers of necrosis immediately before and after each procedure. Primary outcome considered is overall death in a 5-year follow-up. Secondary outcomes are levels of CK-MB isoenzyme and I-Troponin in association with presence of myocardial fibrosis and systolic left ventricle dysfunction assessed by CMR. DISCUSSION: The MASS-V Trial aims to establish reliable values for parameters of enzyme markers of myocardial necrosis in the absence of manifest myocardial infarction after mechanical interventions. The establishments of these indices have diagnostic value and clinical prognosis and therefore require relevant and different therapeutic measures. In daily practice, the inappropriate use of these necrosis markers has led to misdiagnosis and therefore wrong treatment. The appearance of a more sensitive tool such as CMR provides an unprecedented diagnostic accuracy of myocardial damage when correlated with necrosis enzyme markers. We aim to correlate laboratory data with imaging, thereby establishing more refined data on the presence or absence of irreversible myocardial injury after the procedure, either percutaneous or surgical, and this, with or without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass.
    BMC Cardiovascular Disorders 08/2012; 12(1):65. DOI:10.1186/1471-2261-12-65 · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: Atherosclerotic plaques progress in a highly individual manner. Plaque eccentricity has been associated with a rupture-prone phenotype and adverse coronary events in humans. Endothelial shear stress (ESS) critically determines plaque growth and low ESS leads to high-risk lesions. However, the factors responsible for rapid disease progression with increasing plaque eccentricity have not been studied. We investigated in vivo the effect of local hemodynamic and plaque characteristics on progressive luminal narrowing with increasing plaque eccentricity in humans. Methods: Three-dimensional coronary artery reconstruction using angiographic and intravascular ultrasound data was performed in 374 patients at baseline (BL) and 6-10 months later (FU) to assess plaque natural history as part of the PREDICTION Trial. A total of 874 coronary arteries were divided into consecutive 3-mm segments. We identified 408 BL discrete luminal narrowings with a throat in the middle surrounded by gradual narrowing proximal and distal to the throat. Local BL ESS was assessed by computational fluid dynamics. The eccentricity index (EI) at BL and FU was computed as the ratio of max to min plaque thickness at the throat. Mixed-effects logistic regression was used to investigate the effect of BL variables on the combined endpoint of substantial worsening of luminal narrowing (decrease in lumen area >1.8 mm2 or >20%) with an increase in plaque EI. Results: Lumen worsening with an increase in plaque EI was evident in 73 luminal narrowings (18%). Independent predictors of worsening lumen narrowing with plaque EI increase were low BL ESS (<1 Pa) distal to the throat (odds ratio [OR] =2.2 [95% CI: 1.3-3.7]; p=0.003) and large BL plaque burden (>51%) at the throat (OR=1.7 [95% CI: 1.0-2.8]; p=0.051). The incidence of worsening lumen narrowing with increasing plaque eccentricity was 30% in the presence of both predictors versus 15% in luminal narrowings without this combination of characteristics (OR=2.4 [95% CI: 1.4-4.3]; p=0.002). Conclusions: Low local ESS independently predicts areas with rapidly progressive luminal narrowing and increasing plaque eccentricity. Coronary regions manifesting an abrupt anatomic change, i.e., at highest risk to cause an adverse event, can be identified early by assessment of ESS and plaque burden.
    European Heart Journal 08/2012; 33(suppl 1):355. DOI:10.1093/eurheartj/ehs282 · 14.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is the most common systemic autoimmune disease, occurring more frequently in women, usually aged between 16 and 55 years1,2. Although classically the kidneys are the organs most affected in SLE, cardiopulmonary circulation and the heart may also be affected significantly3. In this context, the occurrence of acute pulmonary edema associated with lupus myocarditis is rare and specific immunosuppressive therapy remains unclear.
    Arquivos brasileiros de cardiologia 05/2012; 98(5):e78-81. DOI:10.1590/S0066-782X2012000500016 · 1.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Acute respiratory failure is present in 5% of patients with acute myocardial infarction and is responsible for 20% to 30% of the fatal post-acute myocardial infarction. The role of inflammation associated with pulmonary edema as a cause of acute respiratory failure post-acute myocardial infarction remains to be determined. We aimed to describe the demographics, etiologic data and histological pulmonary findings obtained through autopsies of patients who died during the period from 1990 to 2008 due to acute respiratory failure with no diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction during life. This study considers 4,223 autopsies of patients who died of acute respiratory failure that was not preceded by any particular diagnosis while they were alive. The diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction was given in 218 (4.63%) patients. The age, sex and major associated diseases were recorded for each patient. Pulmonary histopathology was categorized as follows: diffuse alveolar damage, pulmonary edema, alveolar hemorrhage and lymphoplasmacytic interstitial pneumonia. The odds ratio of acute myocardial infarction associated with specific histopathology was determined by logistic regression. In total, 147 men were included in the study. The mean age at the time of death was 64 years. Pulmonary histopathology revealed pulmonary edema as well as the presence of diffuse alveolar damage in 72.9% of patients. Bacterial bronchopneumonia was present in 11.9% of patients, systemic arterial hypertension in 10.1% and dilated cardiomyopathy in 6.9%. A multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant positive association between acute myocardial infarction with diffuse alveolar damage and pulmonary edema. For the first time, we demonstrated that in autopsies of patients with acute respiratory failure as the cause of death, 5% were diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. Pulmonary histology revealed a significant inflammatory response, which has not previously been reported.
    Clinics (São Paulo, Brazil) 03/2012; 67(3):213-7. DOI:10.6061/clinics/2012(03)02 · 1.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report on a 30-year-old female patient, with biological mitral valve prosthesis due to symptomatic mitral stenosis and a history of acute myocardial infarction and generalized tonic-clonic seizure episodes, visual hallucinations, cerebral thromboembolic events and, at present, chorea and acute carditis. The patient was diagnosed with active rheumatic fever (RF), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). The combination of three unusual diagnoses in the same patient makes this a unique case, modifying patient treatment and prognosis.
    Arquivos brasileiros de cardiologia 02/2012; 98(2):e28-31. DOI:10.1590/S0066-782X2012000200016 · 1.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is increasing interest in autoimmune diseases, especially their relationship with cardiovascular disease. Rheumatoid arthritis in particular has been considered an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease in recent years. Various studies have aimed to clarify important aspects of risk stratification and treatment options in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and specific therapies are being studied that promise to reduce their long-term cardiovascular risk. We performed a wide-ranging review of the literature to highlight the importance of atherosclerotic and inflammatory mechanisms in coronary artery disease. We also suggest strategies for risk stratification and treatment of cardiovascular disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.
    Revista portuguesa de cardiologia: orgao oficial da Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia = Portuguese journal of cardiology: an official journal of the Portuguese Society of Cardiology 01/2012; 31(3):225-32. DOI:10.1016/j.repce.2012.01.011 · 0.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the impact of hyperglycemia in different age-groups of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS :A total of 2,027 patients with AMI were categorized into one of five age-groups: <50 years (n = 301), ≥50 and <60 (n = 477), ≥60 and <70 (n = 545), ≥70 and <80 (n = 495), and ≥80 years (n = 209). Hyperglycemia was defined as initial glucose ≥115 mg/dL. The adjusted odds ratios for hyperglycemia predicting hospital mortality in groups 1-5 were, respectively, 7.57 (P = 0.004), 3.21 (P = 0.046), 3.50 (P = 0.003), 3.20 (P < 0.001), and 2.16 (P = 0.021). The adjusted P values for correlation between glucose level (as a continuous variable) and mortality were 0.007, <0.001, 0.043, <0.001, and 0.064. The areas under the ROC curves (AUCs) were 0.785, 0.709, 0.657, 0.648, and 0.613. The AUC in group 1 was significantly higher than those in groups 3-5. The impact of hyperglycemia as a risk factor for hospital mortality in AMI is more pronounced in younger patients.
    Diabetes care 01/2012; 35(1):150-2. DOI:10.2337/dc11-1170 · 8.57 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

976 Citations
276.55 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1991–2014
    • Instituto do Coração
      San Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
    • University of São Paulo
      • Faculty of Medicine (FM)
      San Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • 2009–2012
    • Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo
      San Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
    • Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein
      San Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • 2006
    • Senac São Paulo
      San Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • 1999
    • Texas Heart Institute
      Houston, Texas, United States
  • 1996
    • Johns Hopkins Medicine
      • Department of Medicine
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
    • National Institute on Aging
      • Laboratory of Cardiovascular Science (LCS)
      Baltimore, MD, United States