B Simizu

Chiba University, Chiba-shi, Chiba-ken, Japan

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Publications (77)235.48 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Neuron-specific sre mRNA, which is expressed in human brain tissue by alternative splicing, is associated with neural differentiation. Neuronal c-srcN I expression may be associated with the ability of neu roblastomas to mature; furthermore, c-srcN2 mRNA is induced in chemically differentiated neuroblastoma cells in vitro. The prognosis of a patient with a neuroblastoma is strongly affected by the ability of the tumor to differentiate in vivo. In order to clarify the relationship between neuronat src mRNA expression and the clinical outcome of a neuroblastoma, we analyzed the expression of src mRNA in neuroblastoma tissues from 28 patients by SI-nuc I ease-protection assay. N-myc gene amplification was also examined by Southern blot hybridization. The clinical significance of neuronal src mRNA expression and its relevance to N-myc gene amplification was also investigated. A high ratio (more than 10%) of c-srcN2 mRNA expression was observed in all early-stage tumors and in advanced neuroblastomas with a favorable prognosis. In contrast, in advanced neuroblastomas with an aggressive clinical phenotype, c-srcN2 mRNA expression was found at a low ratio (below 10%). Genomic amplification of the N-myc gene and expression of c-srcN2 mRNAs were inversely correlated. When combined with other prognostic markers such as N-myc gene amplification, the expression of c-srcN2 mRNA may be a new biological marker to predict the prognosis of patients with neuroblastomas.
    International Journal of Cancer 07/2006; 58(6):793 - 798. · 6.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Human papillomavirus (HPV) type 6 induces benign tumors such as condyloma acuminata and laryngeal papilloma. The HPV-6 DNA has been thought to be a heterogeneous group of subtypes and variant-types. To examine sequence variations of the HPV-6 L1 ORF, we analyzed by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and by DNA sequencing 21 specimens from condyloma acuminata and laryngeal papilloma that harbor HPV-6 DNA. PCR products of HPV-6 DNA were digested with 6 restriction enzymes yielding 8 fragments, which were then analyzed by SSCP. The resolution patterns showed that the L1 coding sequences were separated into three SSCP groups, I, II, and III, and two minor groups, (I) and (III). By sequencing the five representatives of each SSCP group and by comparing these sequences with those of HPV-6a [Hofmann et al., 1995] and HPV-6b [Schwarz et al., 1983], we identified base substitutions at 20 positions in the L1 coding region and an amino acid substitution in one case.
    Journal of Medical Virology 10/1997; 53(1):19-24. · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E6 protein has a transcription-modulatory activity for a wide variety of viral promoters, a cellular target for this activity of E6 has not yet been identified. In this study, using differential hybridization, we identified a mouse fibronectin (FN) gene as a putative cellular target whose expression is up-regulated by E6. Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) assays with mouse and rat FN promoter-CAT fusion constructs indicated that HPV16 E6 transactivates the FN promoters in a p53-independent manner. Deletion and site-specific mutation analyses revealed that transactivation by HPV16 E6 depends upon a cyclic AMP response element (CRE) located at -160 relative to the start site of transcription. Gel retardation assays demonstrated that nuclear extracts from the HPV16 E6-expressing cells, compared to those from parental 10T1/2 cells, have increased binding activity to the CRE. Antibodies against c-Jun and ATF-2 disrupted this binding activity. These data indicate that HPV16 E6 transcriptionally modulates FN gene expression via the CRE by inducing the binding of the protein complexes, probably including c-Jun and ATF-2, to the CRE.
    Journal of Virology 07/1997; 71(6):4310-8. · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To clarify the molecular mechanism of phencyclidine (PCP)-induced schizophreniform psychosis in humans and of behavioral abnormalities in experimental animals, we used differential screening of a cDNA library from the cerebral cortex of rats treated with PCP. We identified a PCP-induced cDNA clone as the gene encoding glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), an enzyme central to glutamate metabolism. GDH mRNA levels significantly increased as early as 15 min following PCP administration in both the cerebral cortex and the cerebellum. This effect was observed even in the presence of a protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. In contrast to a transient increase in c-fos expression, the elevation of GDH mRNA levels lasted up to 8 days after a single PCP injection. These results suggest that GDH mRNA induction may be involved in the pathology of PCP-induced psychosis, and that GDH may be one of the candidate genes that are vulnerable in subjects with schizophrenia.
    Schizophrenia Research 07/1997; 25(3):251-8. · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The human papillomavirus type 16 E6 protein exerts a transforming activity through inactivation of tumor suppressor p53. Recently E6 has been shown to have additional transforming activities independent of p53. E6 is able to transactivate or repress several specific viral promoters. However, underlying molecular mechanisms and cellular target genes for the activity are not well understood. Using a differential hybridization technique, we identified the prothymosin alpha gene as a cellular target of E6 transactivation. E6 was able to transactivate the prothymosin alpha promoter in H358 cells lacking p53 and in C33A cells harboring a mutant p53 allele. Disruption of the E-box in intron 1 of the prothymosin alpha promoter abolished the responsiveness to E6. Then we determined if E6 up-regulates the expression of Myc, by which the prothymosin alpha promoter is transactivated through the E-box. We found that E6 is also able to transactivate the c-myc promoter in H358 cells and in C33A cells. These results suggest that E6 is able to transactivate the c-myc promoter independently of p53, and that the prothymosin alpha promoter is subsequently transactivated by Myc.
    Virology 06/1997; 232(1):53-61. · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This report demonstrates that normal human fibroblasts can be immortalized by the introduction of HPV-16 E6-E7 genes. We designed zinc-inducible expression plasmids with HPV-16 E6, E7 or both. Each plasmid was introduced into normal human fibroblasts (TIG-3 cells) using lipofection methods. Only transfectants with the HPV-16 E6-E7 zinc-inducible expression plasmid, which were cultured in medium supplemented with 100 microM ZnSO4, overcame crisis and could be cultured over 200 population doubling levels (PDLs). These cell lines showed the reactivation of telomerase after crisis, and morphological alterations were also observed.
    Microbiology and Immunology 02/1997; 41(4):313-9. · 1.55 Impact Factor
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    Y Tomita, T Shiga, B Simizu
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    ABSTRACT: A human papillomavirus type 11 (HPV-11) early gene promoter, PE1--E4, in the E7 open reading frame and involved in the transcription of E1--E4 and E1--E4, L1 mRNAs was characterized by chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) assay, gel-shift assay, in vitro transcription, and primer extension. By CAT assay with CAT-expression plasmids containing various portions of the HPV-11 genome from nucleotide position (nt) 235 to nt 743, we identified a 112-basepair (bp) sequence (nt 632-743) that had high promoter activity and a 188-bp upstream sequence from nt 395 to nt 572 that strongly suppressed activity. The 112-bp sequence contained a 7-bp repeat (7-bp Rep) with high homology to the Sp1-binding motif (BM) in the E6 promoter of HPV-11 but lacked an identifiable TATA-box. A cellular protein other than Sp1 bound to the 7-bp Rep. Removal of a 21-bp segment (nt 632-652) containing the 7-bp Rep significantly reduced activity. By in vitro transcription assay and primer extension, one of the transcription start sites was mapped to near nt 719. These results suggested that a cellular protein that binds to the 7-bp Rep may act as an activator for PE1--E4.
    Virology 12/1996; 225(2):267-73. · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The myc proto-oncogene family plays an important role in the control of cellular growth and differentiation. Mxi1, one of the Max-associated proteins, has been known to have an antagonistic action on Myc activity. The mxi1 mRNA increased during growth inhibition and differentiation, and decreased with serum stimulation in mammal cell lines. We have also found an AAAAC polymorphic repeat in the 3' non-coding region of the human mxi1 cDNAs and a difference between the mxi1 mRNA half-lives in some different cell lines.
    Gene 11/1996; 176(1-2):45-8. · 2.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Using a differential hybridization technique, we have identified a mouse cellular gene, high mobility group protein HMG-I(Y), whose expression is up-regulated by the E6 protein of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16. This gene was overexpressed in E6-expressing mouse 10T1/2 cells, but not in G418-resistant 10T1/2 cells. The expression of the HMG-I(Y) gene was up-regulated by the transient expression of E6 from a zinc-inducible human metallothionein-IIA gene promoter. Expression was found to be more efficient at a confluent cell density than at a subconfluent cell density. The up-regulation of HMG-I(Y) gene expression by E6, in particular at a confluent cell density, may be part of an altered genetic program in host cells infected with HPV-16.
    Virus Research 07/1996; 42(1-2):119-25. · 2.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The mechanism by which the E6 protein of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) transactivates heterologous virus promoters has not been established. In this study, the involvement of p53-mediated transcriptional repression in transactivation by the HPV-16 E6 protein was examined using several virus promoters. HPV-16 E6 transactivated the TATA box-containing simian virus 40 early promoter and the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat in p53-containing cells but not in p53-deficient cells. In contrast, the adenovirus E2 promoter was transactivated both in p53-containing and p53-deficient cells. These results indicate that the transactivation activity of the HPV-16 E6 protein is mediated by p53-dependent and promoter-specific p53-independent pathways.
    Journal of General Virology 04/1996; 77 ( Pt 3):459-63. · 3.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Rotaviruses were detected via electron microscopy in fecal specimens collected from school children during an outbreak of diarrhea and from a sporadic case in 1993 in Japan. All of the viruses were found to belong to human group C rotavirus by reverse passive hemagglutination assay (RPHA). These viruses replicated well in a human colon carcinoma (CaCo-2) cell line cultured in the presence of trypsin (4 micrograms/ml). This report demonstrates that human group C rotaviruses can be propagated efficiently in a cell line cultured in the presence of trypsin. The infected cells did not show any apparent cytopathic changes. However, virus was detected in the cell cytoplasm by immunofluorescence (IF) staining and in the culture supernatant by RPHA. On the basis of immune electron microscopy (IEM), virus particles collected from infected CaCo-2 cell cultures were confirmed to aggregate specifically with anti-human group C rotavirus antibody. The electrophoretic patterns of RNA segments extracted from viral particles found in the fecal specimens or infected cells were identical to those of human group C rotavirus. These results indicated that human group C rotaviruses were the causal agent of the diarrhea outbreak.
    Journal of Medical Virology 02/1996; 48(1):48-52. · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a pleiotropic cytokine that is not only a mediator in major immunologic reactions but also a growth factor of keratinocytes. We studied the IL-6 secretion in vitro of 15 human cell lines derived from both squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix. Four of the eight well differentiated SCC secreted a large amount (> 1500 pg/48 h/10(6) cells) of IL-6 in nude mice. In contrast, poorly differentiated SCC cell lines and all of the 7 adenocarcinoma cell lines secreted a small amount (< 500 pg/48 h/10(6) cells of IL-6). The expression of IL-6 mRNA of the cell lines correlated well with their IL-6 secretion potential. However, the expression of IL-6 receptor did not correlate with the IL-6 secretory potential. We also studied the IL-6 secretion of freshly isolated normal squamous epithelium and of dysplastic epithelium. In culture, two normal squamous epithelia secreted a large amount (> 2000 pg/48 h/10(6) cells), whereas 8 dysplasia epithelia secreted an extremely small amount (< 10 pg/48 h/10(6) cells). About one-third of patients with SCC had a raised serum IL-6 value. IL-6 production may help to differentiate between SCC and adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix. IL-6 regulation seems to change in the course of SCC carcinogenesis.
    Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics 02/1996; 258(1):25-33. · 1.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The myc proto-oncogene family plays an important role in the control of cellular growth and differentiation. Mxil, one of the Max-associated proteins, has been known to have an antagonistic action on Myc activity. The mxil mRNA increased during growth inhibition and differentiation, and decreased with serum stimulation in mammal cell lines. We have also found an AAAAC polymorphic repeat in the 3′ non-coding region of the human mxil cDNAs and a difference between the mxil mRNA half-lives in some different cell lines.
    Gene 01/1996; 176:45-48. · 2.20 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Medical Virology 01/1996; 48(1):48-52. · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Human papillomavirus (HPV) type 6a genomes with a large deletion in their L1 open reading frames (ORF) were found in two of five recurrent cases of laryngeal papilloma. One of these mutant HPVs had a 186 base pair (bp) deletion near the N-terminus end of the L1 ORF, which encodes a major capsid protein. The other had a 454 bp deletion at the C-terminus end of L1 at which is located a nuclear localising signal (NLS). No other large deletion or insertion was found in the remaining regions of all five HPV6a genomes. The laryngeal papillomas which harboured the mutant viruses showed typical hyperplasia and pathological changes as observed in tumours induced by the wild-type virus. The biological significance of the two large deletions in the late region of HPV6a associated with laryngeal papilloma is discussed.
    Journal of Medical Virology 12/1995; 47(3):191-7. · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Using a differential hybridization technique, the murine farnesyltransferase alpha (FTA)-encoding cDNA was cloned from a mouse 10T1/2 cell line which expresses the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E6 gene. Sequence analysis revealed that the murine 1647-bp FTA cDNA encoded 377 amino acid (aa). The murine and human sequences showed 83.2% nucleotide and 92.6% aa sequence identity.
    Gene 11/1995; 164(2):373-4. · 2.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The DNA genome of a canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) was completely sequenced and found to consist of 8607 base pairs, which were the longest of all known papillomaviruses (PVs). Its organization was similar to that of other PVs except that it lacked early gene 5 (E5) and possessed a unique long noncoding region (L-NCR) between the end of the early genes and the beginning of the late genes. COPV also possessed a short noncoding region (S-NCR) which contained a putative upper regulatory region (URR), which is commonly found in PVs. The L-NCR did not show any similarity to known PV DNAs nor other DNA sequences in the GenBank database. Nucleotide sequence analysis of COPV showed that it was closely related to human papillomavirus type 1 (HPV 1) and animal PVs associated with cutaneous lesions in rabbit, European elk, deer and cow as we reported previously.
    International Journal of Oncology 07/1995; 7(1):155-9. · 2.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To examine whether human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA is associated with esophageal cancer, frozen and paraffin-embedded neoplasms of the upper aerodigestive tract, including esophageal cancer, were investigated. DNA obtained from frozen specimens and cell lines were analyzed by both polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot hybridization. DNA from paraffin-embedded samples were analyzed strictly by PCR. DNA of HPV types 6 and 11 was detected in papillomas of the upper respiratory tract at > 50%. However, HPV DNA was infrequently detected in specimens from the upper digestive tract (31 esophageal cancers and 2 esophageal carcinoma--derived cell lines), even by PCR at a sensitivity of 0.1 copy number per cell. These results suggest that the etiologic significance of HPV infection in esophageal cancer is negligible.
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases 03/1995; 171(2):425-8. · 5.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The cloning and sequencing of the murine Mxi1 gene encoding Mxi1, one of Max-associated proteins, is described. Murine and human sequences showed 87.9% nucleotide (nt) and 90.3% amino acid (aa) sequence homology, whereas murine and zebra fish sequences showed 67.2% nt and 67.8% aa sequence homology.
    Gene 02/1995; 152(2):283-4. · 2.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) DNA was isolated from two different sources. One of these DNAs was molecularly cloned and its physical map was determined. Hybridization analyses using subgenomic fragments of bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1) and human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) as probes revealed that the cloned COPV shared moderate homology within the E1 and L1 regions of BPV-1 and HPV16, whereas homology in other regions of BPV-1 and HPV16 was low. The putative L1 gene of COPV was sequenced and several conserved regions, including antigenic epitopes which are common in other known papillomaviruses, were analyzed.
    Gene 10/1994; 146(2):261-5. · 2.20 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

753 Citations
235.48 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1971–2006
    • Chiba University
      • Department of Pediatric Surgery
      Chiba-shi, Chiba-ken, Japan
  • 1992
    • Dokkyo Medical University
      • Department of Surgery I
      Tochigi, Tochigi-ken, Japan
  • 1979
    • The University of Tokyo
      • Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences
      Tokyo, Tokyo-to, Japan