Andrew M Shedlock

Tokyo University of Agriculture, Edo, Tōkyō, Japan

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Publications (27)229.73 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: We describe the genome of the western painted turtle, Chrysemys picta bellii, one of the most widespread, abundant and well-studied turtles. We place the genome into a comparative evolutionary context, and focus on genomic features associated with tooth loss, immune function, longevity, sex differentiation and determination, and the species¿ physiological capacities to withstand extreme anoxia and tissue freezing. RESULTS: Our phylogenetic analyses confirm that turtles are the sister group to living archosaurs, and demonstrate an extraordinarily slow rate of sequence evolution in the painted turtle. The ability of the painted turtle to withstand complete anoxia and partial freezing appears to be associated with common vertebrate gene networks, and we identify candidate genes for future functional analyses. Tooth loss shares a common pattern of pseudogenization and degradation of tooth-specific genes with birds, although the rate of accumulation of mutations is much slower in the painted turtle. Genes associated with sex differentiation generally reflect phylogeny rather than convergence in sex determination functionality. Among gene families that demonstrate exceptional expansions or show signatures of strong natural selection, immune function and musculoskeletal patterning genes are consistently overrepresented. CONCLUSIONS: Our comparative genomic analyses indicate that common vertebrate regulatory networks, some of which have analogs in human diseases, are often involved in the western painted turtle¿s extraordinary physiological capacities. As these regulatory pathways are analyzed at the functional level, the painted turtle may offer important insights into the management of a number of human health disorders.
    Genome biology 03/2013; 14(3):R28. · 10.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The schizothoracine fishes, also known as "mountain carps" are widely distributed in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau and its peripheral regions. Although they provide a prime example of high altitude adaptation, the phylogenetic relationships and the divergence times among these carp lineages are still controversial. Moreover, the genetic basis for high altitude adaptation is also poorly understood. In this study, we determined the mitochondrial genomes from two species of the schizothoracine fishes, representing a "morphologically primitive" clade and "morphologically specialized" clade, respectively. The phylogenetic tree and the divergence times were estimated within the evolutionary framework of the entire order Cypriniformes. Our results indicate a polyphylyetic relationship of the schizothoracine fishes and suggest two independent migration events into the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau: one by the "morphologically primitive" clade in the Late Miocene and another by the "morphologically specialized" clade in the Eocene. Rapid speciation events of each clade from the Late Miocene to the Pliocene correspond to the timing of the geologic acceleration of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Interestingly, we found evidence for positive selection acting on the protein coding genes in the mitochondrial genomes of the "morphologically specialized" clade, implying a possible genetic basis for high altitude adaptation in this derived lineage of cypriniform fishes.
    Gene 01/2013; · 2.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Goats (Capra hircus) are one of the oldest domesticated species, and they are kept all over the world as an essential resource for meat, milk, and fiber. Although recent archeological and molecular biological studies suggested that they originated in West Asia, their domestication processes such as the timing of population expansion and the dynamics of their selection pressures are little known. With the aim of addressing these issues, the nearly complete mitochondrial protein-encoding genes were determined from East, Southeast, and South Asian populations. Our coalescent time estimations suggest that the timing of their major population expansions was in the Late Pleistocene and significantly predates the beginning of their domestication in the Neolithic era (≈10,000 years ago). The ω (ratio of non-synonymous rate/synonymous substitution rate) for each lineage was also estimated. We found that the ω of the globally distributed haplogroup A which is inherited by more than 90% of goats examined, turned out to be extremely low, suggesting that they are under severe selection pressure probably due to their large population size. Conversely, the ω of the Asian-specific haplogroup B inherited by about 5% of goats was relatively high. Although recent molecular studies suggest that domestication of animals may tend to relax selective constraints, the opposite pattern observed in our goat mitochondrial genome data indicates the process of domestication is more complex than may be presently appreciated and cannot be explained only by a simple relaxation model.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(8):e67775. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The evolution of the amniotic egg was one of the great evolutionary innovations in the history of life, freeing vertebrates from an obligatory connection to water and thus permitting the conquest of terrestrial environments. Among amniotes, genome sequences are available for mammals and birds, but not for non-avian reptiles. Here we report the genome sequence of the North American green anole lizard, Anolis carolinensis. We find that A. carolinensis microchromosomes are highly syntenic with chicken microchromosomes, yet do not exhibit the high GC and low repeat content that are characteristic of avian microchromosomes. Also, A. carolinensis mobile elements are very young and diverse-more so than in any other sequenced amniote genome. The GC content of this lizard genome is also unusual in its homogeneity, unlike the regionally variable GC content found in mammals and birds. We describe and assign sequence to the previously unknown A. carolinensis X chromosome. Comparative gene analysis shows that amniote egg proteins have evolved significantly more rapidly than other proteins. An anole phylogeny resolves basal branches to illuminate the history of their repeated adaptive radiations.
    Nature 08/2011; 477(7366):587-91. · 38.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The genomes of birds and nonavian reptiles (Reptilia) are critical for understanding genome evolution in mammals and amniotes generally. Despite decades of study at the chromosomal and single-gene levels, and the evidence for great diversity in genome size, karyotype, and sex chromosome diversity, reptile genomes are virtually unknown in the comparative genomics era. The recent sequencing of the chicken and zebra finch genomes, in conjunction with genome scans and the online publication of the Anolis lizard genome, has begun to clarify the events leading from an ancestral amniote genome--predicted to be large and to possess a diverse repeat landscape on par with mammals and a birdlike sex chromosome system--to the small and highly streamlined genomes of birds. Reptilia exhibit a wide range of evolutionary rates of different subgenomes and, from isochores to mitochondrial DNA, provide a critical contrast to the genomic paradigms established in mammals.
    Annual review of genomics and human genetics 09/2010; 11:239-64. · 11.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The teleost order Lophiiformes, commonly known as the anglerfishes, contains a diverse array of marine fishes, ranging from benthic shallow-water dwellers to highly modified deep-sea midwater species. They comprise 321 living species placed in 68 genera, 18 families and 5 suborders, but approximately half of the species diversity is occupied by deep-sea ceratioids distributed among 11 families. The evolutionary origins of such remarkable habitat and species diversity, however, remain elusive because of the lack of fresh material for a majority of the deep-sea ceratioids and incompleteness of the fossil record across all of the Lophiiformes. To obtain a comprehensive picture of the phylogeny and evolutionary history of the anglerfishes, we assembled whole mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequences from 39 lophiiforms (33 newly determined during this study) representing all five suborders and 17 of the 18 families. Sequences of 77 higher teleosts including the 39 lophiiform sequences were unambiguously aligned and subjected to phylogenetic analysis and divergence time estimation. Partitioned maximum likelihood analysis confidently recovered monophyly for all of the higher taxa (including the order itself) with the exception of the Thaumatichthyidae (Lasiognathus was deeply nested within the Oneirodidae). The mitogenomic trees strongly support the most basal and an apical position of the Lophioidei and a clade comprising Chaunacoidei + Ceratioidei, respectively, although alternative phylogenetic positions of the remaining two suborders (Antennarioidei and Ogcocephaloidei) with respect to the above two lineages are statistically indistinguishable. While morphology-based intra-subordinal relationships for relatively shallow, benthic dwellers (Lophioidei, Antennarioidei, Ogcocephaloidei, Chaunacoidei) are either congruent with or statistically indistinguishable from the present mitogenomic tree, those of the principally deep-sea midwater dwellers (Ceratioidei) cannot be reconciled with the molecular phylogeny. A relaxed molecular-clock Bayesian analysis of the divergence times suggests that all of the subordinal diversifications have occurred during a relatively short time period between 100 and 130 Myr ago (early to mid Cretaceous). The mitogenomic analyses revealed previously unappreciated phylogenetic relationships among the lophiiform suborders and ceratioid familes. Although the latter relationships cannot be reconciled with the earlier hypotheses based on morphology, we found that simple exclusion of the reductive or simplified characters can alleviate some of the conflict. The acquisition of novel features, such as male dwarfism, bioluminescent lures, and unique reproductive modes allowed the deep-sea ceratioids to diversify rapidly in a largely unexploited, food-poor bathypelagic zone (200-2000 m depth) relative to the other lophiiforms occurring in shallow coastal areas.
    BMC Evolutionary Biology 02/2010; 10:58. · 3.29 Impact Factor
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    Chris L Organ, Andrew M Shedlock
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    ABSTRACT: The two living groups of flying vertebrates, birds and bats, both have constricted genome sizes compared with their close relatives. But nothing is known about the genomic characteristics of pterosaurs, which took to the air over 70 Myr before birds and were the first group of vertebrates to evolve powered flight. Here, we estimate genome size for four species of pterosaurs and seven species of basal archosauromorphs using a Bayesian comparative approach. Our results suggest that small genomes commonly associated with flight in bats and birds also evolved in pterosaurs, and that the rate of genome-size evolution is proportional to genome size within amniotes, with the fastest rates occurring in lineages with the largest genomes. We examine the role that drift may have played in the evolution of genome size within tetrapods by testing for correlated evolution between genome size and body size, but find no support for this hypothesis. By contrast, we find evidence suggesting that a combination of adaptation and phylogenetic inertia best explains the correlated evolution of flight and genome-size contraction. These results suggest that small genome/cell size evolved prior to or concurrently with flight in pterosaurs. We predict that, similar to the pattern seen in theropod dinosaurs, genome-size contraction preceded flight in pterosaurs and bats.
    Biology letters 11/2008; 5(1):47-50. · 3.35 Impact Factor
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    Andrew M Shedlock, Daniel E Janes, Scott V Edwards
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    ABSTRACT: Phylogenomics research integrating established principles of systematic biology and taking advantage of the wealth of DNA sequences being generated by genome science holds promise for answering long-standing evolutionary questions with orders of magnitude more primary data than in the past. Although it is unrealistic to expect whole-genome initiatives to proceed rapidly for commercially unimportant species such as reptiles, practical approaches utilizing genomic libraries of large-insert clones pave the way for a phylogenomics of species that are nevertheless essential for testing evolutionary hypotheses within a phylogenetic framework. This chapter reviews the case for adopting genome-enabled approaches to evolutionary studies and outlines a program for using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries or plasmid libraries as a basis for completing "genome scans" of reptiles. We have used BACs to close a critical gap in the genome database for Reptilia, the sister group of mammals, and present the methodological approaches taken to achieve this as a guideline for designing similar comparative studies. In addition, we provide a detailed step-by-step protocol for BAC-library screening and shotgun sequencing of specific clones containing target genes of evolutionary interest. Taken together, the genome scanning and shotgun sequencing techniques offer complementary diagnostic potential and can substantially increase the scale and power of analyses aimed at testing evolutionary hypotheses for nonmodel species.
    Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.) 01/2008; 422:91-117. · 1.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present a strategy for phylogenetic marker development in non-model systems. Rather than using the traditional approach of comparing distantly related taxa to develop conserved primers for unknown species, we explore an alternative strategy that builds primers directly from a single, relatively well characterized species and applies those primers to increasingly distantly related taxa. We develop and test our protocol with turtles. Using a single BAC end-sequence library consisting of 3461 sequences totaling 2.43 million base pairs of data, we outline a procedure to flag repeat elements, followed by a BLAST approach to categorize sequences into high, low, and no similarity compartments compared to GenBank sequences. We developed and tested a panel of 96 primer pairs with a set of turtle tissues that forms a series of increasingly distantly related taxa with respect to the BAC reference species. Finally, we sequenced 11 of these newly discovered markers across a diverse set of 18 turtle species that spans the 210 million years of chelonian crown-group history and that includes representatives of most of the major clades of extant turtles. Our results indicate that large numbers of new, phylogenetically informative markers can be developed quickly and inexpensively from a single BAC, EST, or similar genomic resource, and that those markers provide reliable phylogenetic information across both shallow and deep levels of phylogenetic history. Our results also highlight the importance of screening for and managing repetitive elements found in randomly sequenced DNA fragments. We presume that our strategy should work well across any similarly divergent clade, suggesting that many-marker datasets can be developed quickly and efficiently for phylogenetic analysis.
    Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 01/2008; · 4.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Avian genomes are small and streamlined compared with those of other amniotes by virtue of having fewer repetitive elements and less non-coding DNA. This condition has been suggested to represent a key adaptation for flight in birds, by reducing the metabolic costs associated with having large genome and cell sizes. However, the evolution of genome architecture in birds, or any other lineage, is difficult to study because genomic information is often absent for long-extinct relatives. Here we use a novel bayesian comparative method to show that bone-cell size correlates well with genome size in extant vertebrates, and hence use this relationship to estimate the genome sizes of 31 species of extinct dinosaur, including several species of extinct birds. Our results indicate that the small genomes typically associated with avian flight evolved in the saurischian dinosaur lineage between 230 and 250 million years ago, long before this lineage gave rise to the first birds. By comparison, ornithischian dinosaurs are inferred to have had much larger genomes, which were probably typical for ancestral Dinosauria. Using comparative genomic data, we estimate that genome-wide interspersed mobile elements, a class of repetitive DNA, comprised 5-12% of the total genome size in the saurischian dinosaur lineage, but was 7-19% of total genome size in ornithischian dinosaurs, suggesting that repetitive elements became less active in the saurischian lineage. These genomic characteristics should be added to the list of attributes previously considered avian but now thought to have arisen in non-avian dinosaurs, such as feathers, pulmonary innovations, and parental care and nesting.
    Nature 04/2007; 446(7132):180-4. · 38.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report results of a megabase-scale phylogenomic analysis of the Reptilia, the sister group of mammals. Large-scale end-sequence scanning of genomic clones of a turtle, alligator, and lizard reveals diverse, mammal-like landscapes of retroelements and simple sequence repeats (SSRs) not found in the chicken. Several global genomic traits, including distinctive phylogenetic lineages of CR1-like long interspersed elements (LINEs) and a paucity of A-T rich SSRs, characterize turtles and archosaur genomes, whereas higher frequencies of tandem repeats and a lower global GC content reveal mammal-like features in Anolis. Nonavian reptile genomes also possess a high frequency of diverse and novel 50-bp unit tandem duplications not found in chicken or mammals. The frequency distributions of approximately 65,000 8-mer oligonucleotides suggest that rates of DNA-word frequency change are an order of magnitude slower in reptiles than in mammals. These results suggest a diverse array of interspersed and SSRs in the common ancestor of amniotes and a genomic conservatism and gradual loss of retroelements in reptiles that culminated in the minimalist chicken genome. The sequences reported in this paper have been deposited in the GenBank database (accession nos. CZ 250707-CZ 257443 and DX 390731-DX 389174).
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 03/2007; 104(8):2767-72. · 9.74 Impact Factor
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    Andrew M Shedlock
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    ABSTRACT: The emerging field of phylogenomics is influencing both the amount and type of characters being brought to bear on long-standing problems in systematic biology. Moreover, the proliferation of sequence information from genome projects in concert with the development of new informatics tools is widening access to comparative data on retroelements to a broad cross section of investigators. Motivated by this, the Society of Systematic Biologists sponsored a symposium entitled "Genome Analysis and the Molecular Systematics of Retroelements," and the resulting papers illustrate this theme of new discoveries and cover three basic areas of research: (i) the taxonomic distribution and phylogenetic structure of families of retroelements; (II) the use of SINE and LINE insertions for phylogenetic inference; and (III) the informatics and classification of repetitive elements. Contributions of each article are briefly discussed in this context and particularly fruitful directions for future research illuminated by results of this symposium are reviewed.
    Systematic Biology 01/2007; 55(6):871-4. · 12.17 Impact Factor
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    Andrew M Shedlock
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    ABSTRACT: It is unlikely that taxonomically diverse phylogenetic studies will be completed rapidly in the near future for nonmodel organisms on a whole-genome basis. However, one approach to advancing the field of "phylogenomics" is to estimate the structure of poorly known genomes by mining libraries of clones from suites of taxa, rather than from single species. The present analysis adopts this approach by taking advantage of megabase-scale end-sequence scanning of reptilian genomic clones to characterize diversity of CR1-like LINEs, the dominant family of transposable elements (TEs) in the sister group of mammals. As such, it helps close an important gap in the literature on the molecular systematics and evolution of retroelements in nonavian reptiles. Results from aligning more than 14 Mb of sequence from the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), painted turtle (Chrysemys picta), Bahamian green anole (Anolis smaragdinus), Tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus), Emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae), and Zebra Finch (Taeniopygia guttata) against a comprehensive library approximately 3000 TE-encoding peptides reflect an increasing abundance of LINE and non-long-terminal-repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposon repeat types with the age of common ancestry among exemplar reptilian clades. The hypothesis that repeat diversity is correlated with basal metabolic rate was tested using comparative methods and a significant nonlinear relationship was indicated. This analysis suggests that the age of divergence between an exemplary clade and its sister group as well as metabolic correlates should be considered in addition to genome size in explaining patterns of retroelement diversity. The first phylogenetic analysis of the largely unexplored chicken repeat 1 (CR1) 3' reverse transcriptase (RT) conserved domains 8 and 9 in nonavian reptiles reveals a pattern of multiple lineages with variable branch lengths, suggesting presence of both old and young elements and the existence of several distinct well-supported clades not apparent from previous characterization of CR1 subfamily structure in birds and the turtle. This mode of CR1 evolution contrasts with historical patterns of LINE 1 diversification in mammals and hints toward the existence of a rich but still largely unexplored diversity of nonavian retroelements of importance to advancing both comparative vertebrate genomics and amniote systematics.
    Systematic Biology 01/2007; 55(6):902-11. · 12.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The family Geoemydidae is one of three in the superfamily Testudinoidea and is the most diversified family of extant turtle species. The phylogenetic relationships in this family and among related families have been vigorously investigated from both morphological and molecular viewpoints. The evolutionary history of Geoemydidae, however, remains controversial. Therefore, to elucidate the phylogenetic relationships of Geoemydidae and related species, we applied the SINE insertion method to investigate 49 informative SINE loci in 28 species. We detected four major evolutionary lineages (Testudinidae, Batagur group, Siebenrockiella group, and Geoemyda group) in the clade Testuguria (a clade of Geoemydidae + Testudinidae). All five specimens of Testudinidae form a monophyletic clade. The Batagur group comprises five batagurines. The Siebenrockiella group has one species, Siebenrockiella crassicollis. The Geoemyda group comprises 15 geoemydines (including three former batagurines, Mauremys reevesii, Mauremys sinensis, and Heosemys annandalii). Among these four groups, the SINE insertion patterns were inconsistent at four loci, suggesting that an ancestral species of Testuguria radiated and rapidly diverged into the four lineages during the initial stage of its evolution. Furthermore, within the Geoemyda group we identified three evolutionary lineages, namely Mauremys, Cuora, and Heosemys. The Heosemys lineage comprises Heosemys, Sacalia, Notochelys, and Melanochelys species, and its monophyly is a novel assemblage in Geoemydidae. Our SINE phylogenetic tree demonstrates extensive convergent morphological evolution between the Batagur group and the three species of the Geoemyda group, M. reevesii, M. sinensis, and H. annandalii.
    Systematic Biology 01/2007; 55(6):912-27. · 12.17 Impact Factor
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    Scott V Edwards, W Bryan Jennings, Andrew M Shedlock
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    ABSTRACT: In the 14 years since the first higher-level bird phylogenies based on DNA sequence data, avian phylogenetics has witnessed the advent and maturation of the genomics era, the completion of the chicken genome and a suite of technologies that promise to add considerably to the agenda of avian phylogenetics. In this review, we summarize current approaches and data characteristics of recent higher-level bird studies and suggest a number of as yet untested molecular and analytical approaches for the unfolding tree of life for birds. A variety of comparative genomics strategies, including adoption of objective quality scores for sequence data, analysis of contiguous DNA sequences provided by large-insert genomic libraries, and the systematic use of retroposon insertions and other rare genomic changes all promise an integrated phylogenetics that is solidly grounded in genome evolution. The avian genome is an excellent testing ground for such approaches because of the more balanced representation of single-copy and repetitive DNA regions than in mammals. Although comparative genomics has a number of obvious uses in avian phylogenetics, its application to large numbers of taxa poses a number of methodological and infrastructural challenges, and can be greatly facilitated by a 'community genomics' approach in which the modest sequencing throughputs of single PI laboratories are pooled to produce larger, complementary datasets. Although the polymerase chain reaction era of avian phylogenetics is far from complete, the comparative genomics era-with its ability to vastly increase the number and type of molecular characters and to provide a genomic context for these characters-will usher in a host of new perspectives and opportunities for integrating genome evolution and avian phylogenetics.
    Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 06/2005; 272(1567):979-92. · 5.68 Impact Factor
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    Andrew M Shedlock, Kazuhiko Takahashi, Norihiro Okada
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    ABSTRACT: The value of short interspersed elements (SINEs) for diagnosing common ancestry is being expanded to examine the differential sorting of lineages through the course of speciation events. Because most SINEs are neutral markers of identical descent, are not precisely excised from the genome and have a known ancestral condition, they are advantageous for reconciling gene trees and species trees with minimal phylogenetic error. A population perspective on SINE evolution combined with coalescence theory provides a context for investigating the phenomenon of ancestral polymorphism and its role in producing incongruent SINE insertion patterns among multiple loci. Studies of human Alu repeats demonstrate the value of young polymorphic SINEs for assessing human genomic diversity and tracking ancient demographics of human populations, whereas incongruent insertion patterns revealed by older fixed SINE loci, such as those in African cichlid fishes, contain information that might help identify ancient radiations that are otherwise obscured by accumulated mutations in sequence data. Here, we review the utility of retroposons for inferring common ancestry, discuss limits to the method, and clarify confusion by providing examples from the literature that illustrate how discordant multi-locus insertion patterns of retroelements can indicate lineage-sorting events that should not be misinterpreted as phylogenetic noise.
    Trends in Ecology & Evolution 11/2004; 19(10):545-53. · 15.39 Impact Factor
  • Norihiro Okada, Andrew M Shedlock, Masato Nikaido
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    ABSTRACT: Advances in genome sciences are demonstrating the dynamic nature of noncoding DNA regions, which are comprised largely of repetitive elements with no apparent function. Retroposons are one class of mobile genetic elements that amplify and move about the genome via a copy-and-paste mechanism that employs an RNA intermediate. Short and long interspersed elements (SINEs and LINEs, respectively) are types of retroposons of particular interest because of their active role in shaping the architecture of genomes and their diagnostic value as evolutionary markers for studies of phylogeny and population biology. Although the use of SINEs and LINEs for molecular systematic studies is proliferating, a comprehensive laboratory protocol that explicitly outlines how to isolate and characterize retroposons for systematic studies in a detailed, step-by-step fashion has been lacking. The present chapter addresses this gap in the literature by focusing on the strategy for isolating new SINEs from a genomic library, the screening process, the sequencing and characterization of clones into subfamilies, quantification of copy number in host taxa, and the critical diagnosis of phylogenetically informative SINE and LINE insertion patterns. Practical limits to the method are discussed in relation to sampling design, systematic character theory, and the empirical distribution of elements observed in eukaryotic lineages. Major steps in the experimental process are illustrated with case examples from a diversity of taxonomic groups and by published results in the molecular biology and systematics literature.
    Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.) 02/2004; 260:189-226. · 1.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: SINE (short interspersed element) insertion analysis elucidates contentious aspects in the phylogeny of toothed whales and dolphins (Odontoceti), especially river dolphins. Here, we characterize 25 informative SINEs inserted into unique genomic loci during evolution of odontocetes to construct a cladogram, and determine a total of 2.8 kb per taxon of the flanking sequences of these SINE loci to estimate divergence times among lineages. We demonstrate that: (i) Odontocetes are monophyletic; (ii) Ganges River dolphins, beaked whales, and ocean dolphins diverged (in this order) after sperm whales; (iii) three other river dolphin taxa, namely the Amazon, La Plata, and Yangtze river dolphins, form a monophyletic group with Yangtze River dolphins being the most basal; and (iv) the rapid radiation of extant cetacean lineages occurred some 28–33 million years B.P., in strong accord with the fossil record. The combination of SINE and flanking sequence analysis suggests a topology and set of divergence times for odontocete relationships, offering alternative explanations for several long-standing problems in cetacean evolution.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 06/2001; 98(13):7384-7389. · 9.74 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
229.73 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013
    • Tokyo University of Agriculture
      • Faculty of Agriculture
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 2004–2010
    • Harvard University
      • Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
      Cambridge, MA, United States
  • 2007
    • National Institute for Basic Biology
      Okazaki, Aichi, Japan
  • 2001
    • Tokyo Institute of Technology
      • Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology
      Tokyo, Tokyo-to, Japan
  • 1992–1997
    • University of Washington Seattle
      • Department of Pathology
      Seattle, Washington, United States