Isao Serizawa

Gifu Pharmaceutical University, Gihu, Gifu, Japan

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Publications (23)120.58 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), can be induced by the immunization of mice with myelin antigens in the form of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is required for the development of individual mononuclear phagocyte populations and is involved in the immune response. We previously reported that Ki20227 (N-{4-[(6,7-dimethoxy-4-quinolyl)oxy]-2-methoxyphenyl}-N'-[1-(1,3-thiazole-2-yl)ethyl]urea) is a highly selective M-CSF receptor (c-fms) tyrosine kinase inhibitor. In our current study, we investigated whether Ki20227 has suppressive effects upon EAE and indeed found that this drug significantly reduced the severity of this disease both preventively and therapeutically. Notably also, Ki20227 treatments inhibited the turn-over/expansion of myeloid cells provoked by the immunization and subsequent MOG-specific T cell responses in our EAE animal model. These findings suggest that M-CSF plays a pivotal role in the development of EAE and that Ki20227 and its derivatives may be candidate drugs for the treatment of human MS.
    Journal of Neuroimmunology 04/2008; 195(1-2):73-80. · 3.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is important in the development of macrophages and osteoclasts. Previous studies have also shown that CD11b(+) myeloblasts and osteoclasts play key roles during inflammation and bone destruction in arthritic lesions. In this study, we investigated whether N-{4-[(6,7-dimethoxy-4-quinolyl)oxy]-2-methoxyphenyl}-N'-[1-(1,3-thiazole-2-yl)ethyl] urea (Ki20227), an inhibitor of the M-CSF receptor (c-Fms), suppressed disease progression in a type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. We found that Ki20227 inhibited M-CSF-dependent reactions, such as lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha production, which were enhanced by M-CSF in vitro. Oral administration of Ki20227 in vivo prevented inflammatory cell infiltration and bone destruction, and consequently suppressed disease progression. In addition, the number of CD11b(+), Gr-1(+), and Ly-6G(+) cells in the spleen decreased in the Ki20227-treated mice, and the CII-induced cytokine production in splenocytes isolated from the Ki20227-treated arthritic mice was also reduced. These observations indicate that Ki20227 might exert its therapeutic effects in the CIA mouse model by suppressing the M-CSF-dependent accumulation of both inflammatory and osteoclast cells, as well as by inhibiting inflammatory cytokine production. Hence, inhibitors of the c-Fms tyrosine kinase might act as anti-inflammatory or anti-osteolytic agents against arthritis.
    European Journal of Immunology 02/2008; 38(1):283-91. · 4.97 Impact Factor
  • Clinical Immunology - CLIN IMMUNOL. 01/2008; 127.
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    ABSTRACT: The effectiveness of a new antibody treatment on arthritis-associated osteolysis was studied by using CIA mice. GGT, a newly identified bone-resorbing factor, was upregulated in arthritic joints. We generated monoclonal antibodies against GGT and injected them into CIA mice. Mice treated with antibodies showed a reduction in osteoclast number and bone erosion. Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) acts as a bone-resorbing factor that stimulates osteoclast formation. GGT expression has been detected in active lymphocytes that accumulate at inflammation sites, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We hypothesize that GGT is an effective target for suppression of arthritis-related osteoclastogenesis and joint destruction. Here, we describe the therapeutic effect of neutralizing antibodies against GGT on joint destruction using a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. GGT expression in the synovium of RA patients and CIA mice was determined by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Monoclonal antibodies were generated against recombinant human GGT (GGT-mAbs) using BALB/c mice. Antibody treatment was performed by intraperitoneal injections of GGT-mAbs into CIA mice. Effects of antibody treatment on arthritis and bone erosion were evaluated by incidence score, arthritis score, and histopathological observations. The role of GGT in osteoclast development was examined by using the established osteoclastogenic culture system. GGT expression was significantly upregulated in inflamed synovium. Immunohistochemistry revealed that GGT was present in lymphocytes, plasma cells, and macrophages, as well as capillaries. Injection of GGT-mAbs significantly decreased the number of osteoclasts and attenuated the severity of joint destruction in CIA mice. In vitro examination showed that GGT enhanced RANKL-dependent osteoclast formation. GGT stimulated the expression of RANKL in osteoblasts and its receptor RANK in osteoclast precursors, respectively. This study indicates that inflamed synovial tissue-derived GGT acts as a risk factor for joint destruction and that the antibody-mediated inhibition of GGT significantly decreases osteoclast number and bone erosion in CIA mice. GGT antagonists might be novel therapeutic agents for attenuating joint destruction in RA patients.
    Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 01/2008; 22(12):1933-42. · 6.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We previously reported that 4C8 monoclonal antibody (mAb) provides a costimulatory signal to human CD4+ T cells and consequently induces regulatory T (Treg) cells, which are hypo-responsive and suppress the polyclonal response of bystander CD4+ cells in a contact-dependent manner. In this study, we identified the antigen of 4C8 mAb as CD52. Costimulation with Campath-1H, a humanized anti-CD52 mAb, also induced Treg cells. Anti-CD52-induced Treg cells suppressed the proliferation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells provided with polyclonal or allogeneic stimulation. When Treg cells were induced from Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) treated cells, they suppressed the response to SEB more efficiently than that to another superantigen, SEA. Furthermore, anti-CD52-induced Treg cells could be expanded by culture with IL-2 followed by CD52-costimulation, and co-injection of expanded Treg cells suppressed lethal xenogeneic graft versus host disease (GvHD) reactions in SCID mice caused by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs).
    Clinical Immunology 10/2006; 120(3):247-59. · 3.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the present study, we examined the inhibitory effects of the beta2-adrenoceptor agonists isoproterenol, salbutamol, fenoterol, and clenbuterol, on the release of chemical mediators from cultured human mast cells after prolonged treatment with the agonists. Although preincubation of sensitized mast cells for 10 min with beta2-adrenoceptor agonists potently inhibited mediator release, prolongation of the preincubation period up to 240 min attenuated the inhibition. The attenuation of histamine release inhibition was potent when compared with that of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) and cysteinyl leukotriene (LT) release inhibition. In contrast, forskolin inhibited mediator release and the inhibition increased gradually in proportion to the preincubation period. The reduced inhibition by the beta2-adrenoceptor agonists was compensated for by simultaneous treatment with cholera toxin. The beta2-adrenoceptor agonists elevated intracellular cAMP levels after 10-min incubation and the elevated levels were almost comparable to those after 240-min incubation. Forskolin elevated the intracellular cAMP levels more potently after incubation for 240 min than after 10 min. When mast cells were incubated for 3 d with the beta2-adrenoceptor agonists, similar attenuation of mediator release inhibition was observed. Elevation of intracellular cAMP levels was also attenuated, although beta2-adrenoceptor mRNA expression was potentiated. The present results collectively indicate that the attenuation of mediator release inhibition by beta2-adrenoceptor agonists under the present experimental conditions involves uncoupling between beta2-adrenoceptors and Gs proteins. Furthermore, the beta2-adrenoceptor desensitization causes differential attenuating effects on the inhibition of histamine, PGD2, and LT release, suggesting that downstream events involved in each inhibitory pathway have different sensitivity to receptor desensitization.
    Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin 11/2004; 27(10):1549-54. · 1.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: NKT cells represent a unique subset of immunoregulatory T cells that recognize glycolipid Ags presented by the MHC class I-like molecule CD1d. Because of their immunoregulatory properties, NKT cells are attractive targets for the development of immunotherapies. The prototypical NKT cell ligand alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer), originally isolated from a marine sponge, has potent immunomodulatory activities in mice, demonstrating therapeutic efficacy against metastatic tumors, infections, and autoimmune diseases, but also has a number of adverse side effects. In vivo administration of alpha-GalCer to mice results in the rapid activation of NKT cells, which is characterized by cytokine secretion, surface receptor down-regulation, expansion, and secondary activation of a variety of innate and adaptive immune system cells. In this study, we have evaluated the in vivo immune response of mice to a set of structural analogues of alpha-GalCer. Our results show that, contrary to current thinking, beta-anomeric GalCer can induce CD1d-dependent biological activities in mice, albeit at lower potency than alpha-anomeric GalCer. In addition, we show that the response of NKT cells to distinct GalCer differs not only quantitatively, but also qualitatively. These findings indicate that NKT cells can fine-tune their immune responses to distinct glycolipid Ags in vivo, a property that may be exploited for the development of effective and safe NKT cell-based immunotherapies.
    The Journal of Immunology 10/2004; 173(6):3693-706. · 5.52 Impact Factor
  • Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin - BIOL PHARM BULL. 01/2004; 27(10):1549-1554.
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Although β-adrenergic receptor agonists inhibit antigen-induced release of histamine, leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2 from human lung fragments, dispersed human lung mast cells and human skin mast cells, subcellular mechanisms for the inhibition of histamine release by β-adrenergic receptor agonists are not well delineated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory mechanisms of β-adrenergic receptor agonists for human mast cell histamine release using human cultured mast cells.Methods: Human mast cells were obtained by culturing umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells in the presence of stem cell factor and interleukin-6. Cultured mast cells were sensitized with human myeloma IgE and stimulated with antihuman IgE.Results: Stimulation of mast cells induced the elevation of intracellular cytosolic free Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]i) and the translocation of protein kinase C (PKC) from the cytosol to the cell membrane, followed by the release of stored histamine. Isoproterenol, sal­butamol and dibutyryl cAMP inhibited both the histamine release and PKC translocation, whereas they failed to affect the elevation of [Ca2+]i. H-89, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, abrogated the inhibition.Conclusions: The present results suggest that PKA activation induced by β-adrenergic receptor agonists plays a crucial role in inhibiting IgE-mediated histamine release from human cultured mast cells through suppressing PKC translocation.
    Allergology International 08/2002; 51(3):197 - 203.
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    ABSTRACT: Diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice is mediated by pathogenic T-helper type 1 (Th1) cells that arise because of a deficiency in regulatory or suppressor T cells. Vα14–Jα15 natural killer T (NKT) cells recognize lipid antigens presented by the major histocompatibility complex class I-like protein CD1d (refs. 3,4). We have previously shown that in vivo activation of Vα14 NKT cells by α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) and CD1d potentiates Th2-mediated adaptive immune responses. Here we show that α-GalCer prevents development of diabetes in wild-type but not CD1d-deficient NOD mice. Disease prevention correlated with the ability of α-GalCer to suppress interferon-γ but not interleukin-4 production by NKT cells, to increase serum immunoglobulin E levels, and to promote the generation of islet autoantigen-specific Th2 cells. Because α-GalCer recognition by NKT cells is conserved among mice and humans, these findings indicate that α-GalCer might be useful for therapeutic intervention in human diseases characterized by Th1-mediated pathology such as Type 1 diabetes.
    Nature Medicine 01/2001; 7(9):1052-1056. · 22.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Human cultured mast cells (HCMC) secrete histamine, sulfidoleukotrienes (LTs), and prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)), and produce a variety of cytokines after aggregation of high-affinity receptors for IgE (FcepsilonRI). With respect to the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinases (JNKs), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) are known. To investigate the roles of these kinase pathways for mediator release from human mast cells, we examined the participation of the activation of these kinases in mediator release, using 1,4-diamino-2, 3-dicyano-1,4-bis(2-aminophenylthio)butadiene (U0126), an ERK pathway inhibitor, and 4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-imid azo le (SB203580), a p38 MAPK pathway inhibitor. U0126 inhibited ERK activation, LT and PGD(2) release, and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) production after stimulation of HCMC. SB203580, on the other hand, potentiated JNK activation and GM-CSF production. The findings of the present study demonstrated that: (i) the release of arachidonic acid metabolites is mediated by the ERK pathway; (ii) GM-CSF production may be driven by both the ERK and JNK pathways; and (iii) the p38 MAPK pathway negatively regulates the JNK pathway. This suggests that MAPK pathways play important roles in mediator release from human mast cells.
    Biochemical Pharmacology 09/2000; 60(4):589-94. · 4.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a newly discovered subset of lymphocytes. It appears that this subset has potential as important regulators of immune responses. But because there are relatively few NKT cells in lymphoid organs and because of technical difficulties in detecting NKT cells in most mouse strains, the roles of NKT cells have not been fully identified and little attention has been paid to the roles of NKT cells in immunological experiments in which NK1.1- strains were used. To examine the existence of functional NKT cells in various strains of experimental mice, including NK1.1- strains, we utilized alpha-galactosylceramide (KRN7000) which is thought to react specifically with NKT cells. Indeed, we could confirm that early cytokine (IL-4 and IFN-gamma) secretion at 2 h after the injection of KRN7000 was dependent on NKT cells. With this in vivo system, we have successfully detected the presence of functional NKT cells in various mouse strains, including AKR/N, BALB/c, C3H/HeJ, C3H/HeN, C57BL/6, C.B-17, CBA/N, NC, NOD, SJL, W/Wv, aly/aly and aly/+. Notable increases of serum IL-4 were detected in W/Wv and aly/+ strains, and defective response of IFN-gamma in SJL mice and that of IL-4 in NOD mice were observed. This is the first report to show the functional significance of NKT cells in cytokine secretion in various mouse strains in response to a ligand for the T cell receptor of NKT cells.
    Experimental Animals 08/2000; 49(3):171-80. · 1.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Immunization of BALB/c mice with alum-adsorbed OVA, followed by three bronchoprovocations with aerosolized OVA, resulted in the development of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and allergic inflammation in the lung accompanied by severe infiltration of eosinophils into airways. In this murine asthma model, administration of monoclonal anti-IL-5 Ab before each Ag challenge markedly inhibited airway eosinophilia, but the treatment did not affect the development of AHR. Immunization and aerosol challenges with OVA following the same protocol failed to induce AHR in the mast cell-deficient W/Wv mice, but induced AHR in their congenic littermates, i.e., WBB6F1 (+/+) mice. No significant difference was found between the W/Wv mice and +/+ mice with respect to the IgE and IgG1 anti-OVA Ab responses and to the airway eosinophilia after Ag provocations. It was also found that reconstitution of W/Wv mice with bone marrow-derived mast cells cultured from normal littermates restored the capacity of developing Ag-induced AHR, indicating that lack of mast cells was responsible for the failure of W/Wv mice to develop Ag-induced AHR under the experimental conditions. However, the OVA-immunized W/Wv mice developed AHR by increasing the frequency and Ag dose of bronchoprovocations. The results suggested that AHR could be developed by two distinct cellular mechanisms. One would go through mast cell activation and the other is IgE/mast cell independent but an eosinophil/IL-5-dependent mechanism.
    The Journal of Immunology 05/2000; 164(7):3855-61. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Flavonoids have a variety of activities including anti-allergic activities, and are known to inhibit histamine release from human basophils and murine mast cells. The effects of luteolin, a flavone, on the immunoglobulin (Ig) E-mediated allergic mediator release from human cultured mast cells (HCMCs) were investigated and compared with those of baicalein and quercetin. HCMCs were sensitized with IgE, and then treated with flavonoids before challenge with antihuman IgE. The amount of released mediators was determined as was mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ concentration, protein kinase C (PKC) translocation and phosphorylation of intracellular proteins were detected after anti-IgE stimulation. Luteolin, baicalein and quercetin inhibited the release of histamine, leukotrienes (LTs), prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from HCMC in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, the three flavonoids inhibited A23187-induced histamine release. As concerns Ca2+ signalling, luteolin and quercetin inhibited Ca2+ influx strongly, although baicalein did slightly. With regard to PKC signalling, luteolin and quercetin inhibited PKC translocation and PKC activity strongly, although baicalein did slightly. The suppression of Ca2+ and PKC signallings might contribute to the inhibition of mediator release. The activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), that were activated just before the release of LTs and PGD2 and GM-CSF mRNA expression in IgE-mediated signal transduction events, were clearly suppressed by luteolin and quercetin. In contrast, the flavonoids did not affect the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) pathway. These results indicate that luteolin is a potent inhibitor of human mast cell activation through the inhibition of Ca2+ influx and PKC activation.
    Clinical & Experimental Allergy 05/2000; 30(4):501-8. · 4.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Liver metastasis of primary tumors is clinically a major problem. We examined the antitumor activity of KRN7000, an alpha-galactosylceramide, in mice with liver metastasis of the B16 melanoma. KRN7000 significantly inhibited tumor growth in the liver, and its potency was similar to that of interleukin-12. The KRN7000 administration resulted in a high percentage of cured mice, which acquired tumor-specific immunity. To study what kinds of antitumor effector cells participated in killing tumor cells, we then performed immunohistological analysis of tumor-infiltrating cells, and found that KRN7000 induced marked invasion of NK1.1+ cells, CD8+ cells, and F4/80+ cells (macrophages) into B16 tumor nodules. In addition, it appeared that KRN7000-treated, liver-associated macrophages possessed strong lytic activity against tumor cells. These results suggest that NK cells, NK1.1+ T (NKT) cells, cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and macrophages play an important role in killing tumor cells in the liver, and that KRN7000 may be useful for the treatment of cancer liver metastasis.
    Oncology Research Featuring Preclinical and Clinical Cancer Therapeutics 02/2000; 12(2):51-8. · 1.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: NK T cells recognize glycolipid Ags such as alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer) presented by the MHC class I-like molecule CD1d. In this paper we have studied the in vivo effects of alpha-GalCer on the generation of adaptive immune responses. Treatment of mice with alpha-GalCer resulted in rapid activation of NK T cells and production of the cytokines IL-4 and IFN-gamma. However, after this initial stimulation, NK T cells became polarized for the production of IL-4. Further, as soon as 6 days after alpha-GalCer injection, a marked increase in serum IgE levels was observed. Administration of alpha-GalCer at the time of priming of mice with protein Ag resulted in the generation of Ag-specific Th2 cells and a profound increase in the production of IgE. Collectively, these findings indicate that alpha-GalCer may be useful for modulating immune responses toward a Th2 phenotype during prophylaxis and therapy.
    The Journal of Immunology 10/1999; 163(5):2373-7. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: NK T cells recognize glycolipid Ags such as a-galactosylcer- amide (a-GalCer) presented by the MHC class I-like molecule CD1d. In this paper we have studied the in vivo effects of a-GalCer on the generation of adaptive immune responses. Treatment of mice with a-GalCer resulted in rapid activation of NK T cells and production of the cytokines IL-4 and IFN-g. However, after this initial stimulation, NK T cells became po- larized for the production of IL-4. Further, as soon as 6 days after a-GalCer injection, a marked increase in serum IgE lev- els was observed. Administration of a-GalCer at the time of priming of mice with protein Ag resulted in the generation of Ag-specific Th2 cells and a profound increase in the produc- tion of IgE. Collectively, these findings indicate that a-GalCer may be useful for modulating immune responses toward a Th2 phenotype during prophylaxis and therapy. The Journal of Immunology, 1999, 163: 2373-2377.
    The Journal of Immunology 09/1999; 163(5). · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: CD1 molecules represent a distinct lineage of antigen-presenting molecules that are evolutionarily related to the classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecules. Unlike the classical MHC products that bind peptides, CD1 molecules have evolved to bind lipids and glycolipids. Murine and human CD1d molecules can present glycolipid antigens such as alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer) to CD1d-restricted natural killer (NK) T cells. Using CD1d knockout mice we demonstrated that CD1d expression is required for the development of NK T cells. These animals were also deficient in the rapid production of interleukin-4 and interferon-gamma in response to stimulation by anti-CD3 antibodies. Despite these defects, CD1d knockout animals were able to generate strong T-helper type 1 (TH1) and TH2 responses. Spleen cells from these animals neither proliferated nor produced cytokines in response to stimulation by alpha-GalCer. Repeated injection of alpha-GalCer into wild-type but not CD1d mutant mice was able to clear metastatic tumors. We further showed that alpha-GalCer can inhibit disease in diabetes-prone non-obese diabetic mice. Collectively, these findings with CD1d knockout animals indicate a critical role for CD1d-dependent T cells in various disease conditions, and suggest that alpha-GalCer may be useful for therapeutic intervention in these diseases.
    Immunological Reviews 07/1999; 169:31-44. · 12.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cultured human mast cells are known to resemble human lung mast cells in terms of the profiles of intracellular protease, the characteristics of histamine release, and the pharmacologic properties. The role of cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in chemical mediator release and cytokine production by human mast cells was determined. We investigated the effects of cAMP-elevating agents on IgE-mediated chemical mediator release and cytokine production by cultured human mast cells. We also examined the relationship between intracellular cAMP levels and the inhibition of chemical mediator release or cytokine production by various drugs. beta-agonists significantly suppressed IgE-mediated release of histamine, leukotrienes, and PGD2 (chemical mediators) and the production of GM-CSF, IL-5 and macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (cytokines). Phosphodiesterase inhibitors (theophylline, rolipram, and cilostazol) had no effect on chemical mediators but suppressed cytokine production. Dibutyryl cAMP significantly suppressed both chemical mediator release and cytokine production, suggesting that their induction was regulated by intracellular cAMP. Elevation of cAMP by beta-agonists at 10 minutes after treatment correlated well with the inhibition of histamine release. There was a significant relationship between cAMP elevation at 180 minutes and the inhibition of GM-CSF production at 360 minutes by beta-agonists, rolipram, or cilostazol. Although 100 micromol/L theophylline significantly inhibited GM-CSF production, it had no effect on cAMP. Elevation of cAMP may be responsible for the inhibitory effect of beta-agonists, rolipram, and cilostazol on chemical mediator release and cytokine production by cultured human mast cells. In contrast, theophylline may inhibit GM-CSF production independently of cAMP.
    Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology 06/1999; 103(5 Pt 2):S421-8. · 12.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Human cultured mast cells (HCMC) release histamine and sulfidoleukotrienes (LTs) upon IgE-FcepsilonRI-mediated mast cell activation. We analyzed the Ca2+ and PKC signaling in HCMC and compared it to that in rodent mast cells. In HCMC, after IgE-mediated stimulation, an elevation of [Ca2+]i and PKC translocation to the membrane fraction was observed. As concerns Ca2+ signaling, 1) IgE-mediated histamine and LTs release was abolished after Ca2+ depletion, and the reconstitution of Ca2+ recovered the release of histamine and LTs. As regards PKC signaling, 1) staurosporine inhibited IgE-mediated mediator release. 2) PKC-downregulated mast cells did not release histamine and LTs. A23187 and PMA synergistically potentiated the activation of extracellular-regulated kinase and synergistically induced histamine and LTs release. These results demonstrated that HCMC might be useful for analysis of the signal transduction pathway for mediator release, such as histamine and LTs.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 05/1999; 257(3):895-900. · 2.28 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
120.58 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1998–2004
    • Gifu Pharmaceutical University
      • Department of Pharmacology
      Gihu, Gifu, Japan
  • 2000
    • Nippon Veterinary and Animal Science University
      • Division of Laboratory Animal Science
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan