G Plaetinck

Ghent University, Gent, VLG, Belgium

Are you G Plaetinck?

Claim your profile

Publications (34)226.9 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The genes encoding the mature forms of mouse (mOB) and human OB (hOB) protein (also called leptin) were fused to the secretion signal coding sequence of the Escherichia coli outer membrane protein A (sOMP A). The hybrid genes were preceded by a ribosome binding site (RBS) and were expressed under transcriptional control of both the lipoprotein promoter (Plpp) and the lac promoter-operator (POlac). The recombinant fusion proteins were efficiently expressed and exported into the periplasmic compartment of E. coli cells from where they were recovered by osmotic shock as soluble mature polypeptides with the sOMP A precisely removed. Recombinant mOB and hOB proteins were also produced in Sf9 insect cells using the baculovirus expression system. Milligram quantities of both proteins were purified to homogeneity using ion-exchange, hydrophobic interaction chromatography and gel filtration and were found to be biologically active and to have antiobesity effects upon testing in genetically obese ob/ob mice.
    Protein Expression and Purification 04/1998; 12(2):249-58. · 1.43 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The leptin receptor is a class I transmembrane protein with either a short or a long cytoplasmic domain. Using chemical cross-linking we have analyzed the binding of leptin to its receptor. Cross-linking of radiolabeled leptin to different isoforms of the leptin receptor expressed on COS-1 cells reveals leptin receptor monomer, homodimer, and oligomer complexes. Cotransfection of the long and short form of the leptin receptor did not provide any evidence for the formation of heterodimer complexes. Soluble forms consisting of either the entire extracellular domain or the two cytokine receptor homologous domains of the leptin receptor were purified to homogeneity from recombinant baculovirus-infected insect cells by leptin affinity chromatography. Gel filtration chromatography showed that these proteins exist in a dimeric form. Analysis of the complex formed between soluble leptin receptor and leptin by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and data obtained from the amino acid composition of the complex provide direct evidence that the extracellular domain of the leptin receptor binds leptin in a 1:1 ratio.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 08/1997; 272(29):18304-10. · 4.65 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Leptin, a fat secreted hormone, regulates ingestive behaviour and energy balance by binding to a specific receptor. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we screened for single amino acid residues in human leptin which are critical for receptor binding and biological activity. Here we report that one of these mutants has in vivo antagonistic properties. An Arg to Gln substitution at position 128 of human leptin does not affect receptor binding but knocks out biological activity. Repeated injection of R128Q in normal C57BL/6J mice results in a progressive increase in body weight. This demonstrates that R128Q is able to interfere with the negative feedback control of endogenous leptin. This mutant could be of therapeutic use for wasting disorders, such as anorexia and cachexia, where weight gain would be beneficial.
    FEBS Letters 04/1997; 405(2):237-40. · 3.58 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Binding studies were conducted to identify the anatomical location of brain target sites for OB protein, the ob gene product. 125I-labeled recombinant mouse OB protein or alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion proteins were used for in vitro and in vivo binding studies. Coronal brain sections or fresh tissue from lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats were probed to identify potential central OB protein-binding sites. We report here that recombinant OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus. The binding of OB protein (either radiolabeled or the alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion protein) and its displacement by unlabeled OB protein was similar in lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats. These findings suggest that OB protein binds with high affinity to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus. After binding to the choroid plexus receptor, OB protein may then be transported across the blood-brain barrier into the cerebrospinal fluid. Alternatively, binding of OB protein to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus may activate afferent neural inputs to the neural network that regulates feeding behavior and energy balance or may result in the clearance or degradation of OB protein. The identification of the choroid plexus as a brain binding site for OB protein will provide the basis for the construction of expression libraries and facilitate the rapid cloning of the choroid plexus OB receptor.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 06/1996; 93(11):5668-73. · 9.81 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Binding studies were conducted to identify the anatomical location of brain target sites for OB protein, the ob gene product. 125I-labeled recombinant mouse OB protein or alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion proteins were used for in vitro and in vivo binding studies. Coronal brain sections or fresh tissue from lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats were probed to identify potential central OB protein-binding sites. We report here that recombinant OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus. The binding of OB protein (either radiolabeled or the alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion protein) and its displacement by unlabeled OB protein was similar in lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats. These findings suggest that OB protein binds with high affinity to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus. After binding to the choroid plexus receptor, OB protein may then be transported across the blood-brain barrier into the cerebrospinal fluid. Alternatively, binding of OB protein to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus may activate afferent neural inputs to the neural network that regulates feeding behavior and energy balance or may result in the clearance or degradation of OB protein. The identification of the choroid plexus as a brain binding site for OB protein will provide the basis for the construction of expression libraries and facilitate the rapid cloning of the choroid plexus OB receptor.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 05/1996; 93(11):5668-5673. · 9.81 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The receptor for interleukin-5 (IL-5) is composed of two different subunits. The IL-5 receptor alpha (IL-5R alpha) is required for ligand-specific binding while association with the beta-chain results in increased binding affinity. Murine IL-5 (mIL-5) has similar activity on human and murine cells, whereas human IL-5 (hIL-5) has marginal activity on murine cells. We found that the combined substitution of K84 and N108 on hIL-5 by their respective murine counterpart yields a molecule which is as potent as mIL-5 for growth stimulation of a murine cell line. Since the unidirectional species specificity is due only to the interaction with the IL-5R alpha subunit, we have used chimeric IL-5R alpha molecules to define regions of hIL-5R alpha involved in species-specific hIL-5 ligand binding. We found that this property is largely determined by the NH2-terminal module of hIL-5R alpha, and detailed analysis defined D56 and to a lesser extent E58 as important for binding. Moreover, two additional residues, D55 and Y57, were identified by alanine scanning mutagenesis within the same region. Based on the observed homology between the NH2-terminal module and the membrane proximal (WSXWS-containing) module of hIL-5R alpha we located this stretch of four amino acid residues (D55, D56, Y57 and E58) in the loop region that connects the C and D beta-strands on the proposed tertiary structure of the NH2-terminal module.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
    The EMBO Journal 08/1995; 14(14):3395-402. · 9.82 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Interleukin (IL)-5 binds to a cell surface receptor composed of two polypeptide chains, alpha and beta, both belonging to the hemopoietic cytokine receptor family. Mouse cells expressing common mouse beta chain (AIC2B) that were transfected with human IL-5 receptor (R)alpha cDNA proliferated in response to picomolar concentrations of human IL-5, indicating that a functional receptor was reconstituted. We show that in these cells, human (h)IL-5 as well as mouse (m)IL-3 induce tyrosine phosphorylation of beta chain and JAK 2 kinase. Phosphorylated beta receptor was co-precipitated with anti-JAK 2 antibodies, suggesting that both molecules were physically associated. IL-5 and IL-3 also induce cytosolic DNA binding activity as measured by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay using the interferon-gamma responsive region of human Fc gamma 1 gene DNA element. A deletion mutant of hIL-5R alpha lacking the cytoplasmic part could bind hIL-5 normally in association with the beta chain, but was unable to transmit a biological signal. The cytoplasmic domain was also indispensable for tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of DNA binding proteins. A membrane-proximal proline-rich element of the hIL-5R alpha cytoplasmic domain that is conserved among different members of the hemopoietic cytokine receptor family was essential for biological activity. Point mutations in this motif also knocked out IL-5-inducible JAK 2 phosphorylation.
    European Journal of Immunology 08/1995; 25(7):1857-64. · 4.97 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A characteristic feature of chronic allergic diseases such as asthma is the increase in eosinophil numbers in the inflamed tissue. In light of its specificity for the development of eosinophils, interleukin-5 (IL-5) is considered the most important cytokine involved in the regulation of eosinophilia. Hence, an antagonist for IL-5 activity is a new target for drug discovery programs. We have examined the opportunity for both a random and a rational approach for the identification of such an antagonist. The elucidation of the structure of IL-5 and the initial structure/function analysis of the ligand/receptor complex constitute a first step towards the design of antagonistic compounds. The identification of a small compound by random screening able to inhibit the IL-5/IL-5 receptor interaction indicated an important domain in the receptor. We examine here protein-based IL-5 antagonists, such as IL-5-muteins, soluble IL-5 receptor constructs, and monoclonal antibodies, for their potential as IL-5/IL-5 receptor antagonists, and the use of a murine model of eosinophil airway inflammation for their evaluation.
    Journal of Leukocyte Biology 07/1995; 57(6):813-9. · 4.57 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A detailed structure-function analysis of human interleukin 5 (hIL5) has been performed. The hIL5 receptor is composed of two different polypeptide chains, the alpha and beta subunits. The alpha subunit alone is sufficient for ligand binding, but association with the beta subunit leads to a 2- to 3-fold increase in binding affinity. The beta chain is shared with the receptors for IL3 and granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor--hence the descriptor beta C (C for common). All hIL5 mutants were analyzed in a solid-phase binding assay for hIL5R alpha interaction and in a proliferation assay using IL5-dependent cell lines for receptor-complex activation. Most residues affecting binding to the receptor alpha subunit were clustered in a loop connecting beta-strand 1 and helix B (mutants H38A, K39A, and H41A), in beta-strand 2 (E89A and R91A; weaker effect for E90A) and close to the C terminus (T109A, E110A, W111S, and I112A). Mutations at one position, E13 (Glu13), caused a reduced activation of the hIL5 receptor complex. In the case of E13Q, only 0.05% bioactivity was detected on a hIL5-responsive subclone of the mouse promyelocytic cell line FDC-P1. Moreover, on hIL5-responsive TF1 cells, the same mutant was completely inactive and proved to have antagonistic properties. Interactions of this mutant with both receptor subunits were nevertheless indistinguishable from those of nonmutated hIL5 by crosslinking and Scatchard plot analysis of transfected COS-1 cells.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 06/1995; 92(11):5194-8. · 9.81 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We have performed a detailed structure-function analysis of human interleukin 5 (hIL5) and its receptor. By testing a hIL5 mutant panel in a solid phase binding assay and a proliferation assay using hIL5 dependent cell-lines, areas on hIL5 involved in either the receptor alpha-subunit interaction or in receptor activation were identified. Epitope mapping data of a neutralizing and a non-neutralizing monoclonal antibody were in agreement with the mutant analysis. hIL5 binding areas on the IL5R alpha-subunit were identified by interspecies chimaera analysis. Finally, hIL5 mutants with reduced receptor activation potential have antagonistic properties.
    Agents and actions. Supplements 02/1995; 46:23-34.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The beta subunit (beta c) of the receptors for human granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin-3 (IL-3) and interleukin-5 (IL-5) is essential for high affinity ligand-binding and signal transduction. An important feature of this subunit is its common nature, being able to interact with GM-CSF, IL-3 and IL-5. Analogous common subunits have also been identified in other receptor systems including gp130 and the IL-2 receptor gamma subunit. It is not clear how common receptor subunits bind multiple ligands. We have used site-directed mutagenesis and binding assays with radiolabelled GM-CSF, IL-3 and IL-5 to identify residues in the beta c subunit involved in affinity conversion for each ligand. Alanine substitutions in the region Tyr365-Ile368 in beta c showed that Tyr365, His367 and Ile368 were required for GM-CSF and IL-5 high affinity binding, whereas Glu366 was unimportant. In contrast, alanine substitutions of these residues only marginally reduced the conversion of IL-3 binding to high affinity by beta c. To identify likely contact points in GM-CSF involved in binding to the 365-368 beta c region we used the GM-CSF mutant eco E21R which is unable to interact with wild-type beta c whilst retaining full GM-CSF receptor alpha chain binding. Eco E21R exhibited greater binding affinity to receptor alpha beta complexes composed of mutant beta chains Y365A, H367A and I368A than to those composed of wild-type beta c or mutant E366A. These results (i) identify the residues Tyr365, His367 and Ile368 as critical for affinity conversion by beta c, (ii) show that high affinity binding of GM-CSF and IL-5 can be dissociated from IL-3 and (iii) suggest that Tyr365, His367 and Ile368 in beta c interact with Glu21 of GM-CSF.
    The EMBO Journal 12/1994; 13(21):5176-85. · 9.82 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Using a fusion protein of the human interleukin-5-receptor alpha chain (hIL5R alpha) and the human IgG C gamma 3 chain (hIL5R alpha-h gamma 3), we have developed a solid-phase assay for high-flux screening of a collection of synthetic compounds. We report on the identification of isothiazolone derivatives as potent inhibitors of binding of interleukin-5 (IL5) to the hIL5R alpha, as measured in a solid-phase assay (soluble hIL5R alpha or hIL5R alpha-h gamma 3) or on COS-1 cells expressing the hIL5R alpha on the cell membrane. The binding of hIL4 and human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) to their respective receptors is not inhibited by the isothiazolones in similar assay systems. Scatchard analysis revealed that these compounds caused a decrease in affinity of the IL5R alpha for IL5. The inhibition of binding IL5 to its receptor by the isothiazolone derivatives is abrogated by free-sulfhydryl-containing compounds such as dithiothreitol, indicating that the isothiazolones react with the sulfhydryl group of free cysteine residues in the hIL5R alpha. Mutation of Cys66 led to a receptor which still binds hIL5, but which was insensitive to the inhibition by isothiazolones. Mutation of Cys249 and Cys296 to serine resulted in complete loss of IL-5-binding activity. The use of radio-labeled isothiazolone confirmed that Cys66, present in the first domain of the receptor, is the target for covalent modification leading to a decrease in affinity.
    European Journal of Biochemistry 11/1994; 225(2):635-40. · 3.58 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Recombinant human interleukin-5 (hIL-5) has been expressed at high levels and produced in large quantities in baculovirus infected Sf9 insect cells. The glycosylated protein was purified using immuno-affinity chromatography and gel filtration. Purified hIL-5 has been crystallized using standard vapour diffusion techniques with PEG as a coprecipitant. The crystals belong to the C2 space group and diffract to 2 A.
    FEBS Letters 10/1993; 331(1-2):49-52. · 3.58 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A murine interleukin-2 (mIL-2)-encoding cDNA, isolated from a stimulated EL4 mRNA library, was used to construct several expression plasmids directing synthesis of the mature protein in Escherichia coli. The expression was under control of either the PTrp or the PL promoter. Using these systems, a high-level expression of between 10 and 35% of the total cellular protein was obtained. The mIL-2 protein, present as insoluble inclusion bodies, could be solubilized in a chaotropic mixture and was partially purified by preparative gel filtration under denaturing conditions. After renaturation, the protein was further purified to homogeneity by anion-exchange chromatography. Depending on the fermentation, induction, and renaturation conditions, the yield ranged between 0.35 and 1 mg of purified mIL-2/g wet cells. The specific biological activity was about 10(7) units/mg and the endotoxin content < 4 ng/mg pure recombinant protein.
    Protein Expression and Purification 06/1993; 4(3):240-6. · 1.43 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Recombinant soluble human interleukin-5 receptor alpha (shIL-5R alpha) has been expressed in COS-1 cells and in baculovirus-infected cells. The protein was purified from the supernatant by chromatography on concanavalin A-Sepharose, MonoQ, and a final gel filtration step. A chimeric fusion receptor protein (hIL-5R alpha-h gamma 3) was constructed by fusion of the cDNA corresponding to the shIL-5R alpha to the cDNA corresponding to the Fc part of the human IgG C gamma 3 chain, and was expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells. The chimeric receptor was secreted as a disulfide-linked homodimer, and was purified by protein G affinity chromatography. In a solid-phase binding assay the shIL-5R alpha and the bivalent hIL-5R alpha-h gamma 3 were found to bind hIL-5 with a similar affinity, corresponding to the membrane-bound, low affinity hIL-5R alpha. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of shIL-5R alpha cross-linked to radiolabeled hIL-5, suggested that one shIL-5R alpha molecule binds to one hIL-5 homodimer molecule. Gel filtration studies of the complex formed between the shIL-5R alpha and hIL-5 pointed toward the same stoichiometry of binding. The formation of such a complex could be observed by electrophoresis in native gels. Immunoaffinity chromatography using a non-neutralizing monoclonal antibody directed against hIL-5, followed by size column chromatography, allowed the purification of the complex. The data obtained from the amino acid analysis of the constituents of the complex blotted from an SDS-polyacrylamide gel, and from the amino acid composition of the complex blotted from a native polyacrylamide gel, provided direct evidence that the shIL-5R alpha binds the hIL-5 dimer in a 1:1 ratio.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 04/1993; 268(9):6581-7. · 4.65 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: By use of a 3' extension PCR strategy, cDNA clones were isolated spanning the transmembrane region and a complete cytoplasmic domain of the human interleukin 5 receptor alpha subunit (hIL5R alpha). These cDNAs differ from previously isolated clones encoding a soluble hIL5R alpha form by a sequence switch at position 1243. When expressed in COS-1 cells, only low-affinity binding of 125I-labeled human interleukin 5 was observed. Coexpression of the hIL5R beta chain led to a 2-fold increase in binding affinity. In addition, this same cloning strategy allowed us to identify a putative second soluble isoform of hIL5R alpha. Genomic data revealed that the two soluble variants arise from either a "normal" splicing event or from the absence of splicing, whereas synthesis of the membrane-anchored form requires alternative splicing.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 09/1992; 89(15):7041-5. · 9.81 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The gene for the hIL-5R alpha subunit, which is present in a single copy in the human genome, has been analysed in detail. It is located on chromosome 3 in the region 3p26. The gene organization reflects its relationship to the cytokine/haematopoietin receptor superfamily. Three introns are located in the 5' untranslated region. The subsequent exons determine the functional domains of the hIL-5R alpha protein: the signal peptide, three fibronectin type III-like (FN-like) modules, each built up by two exons, the membrane anchor and two exons forming the cytoplasmic tail, the first of which contains the proline cluster region. In addition, a specific exon generating a soluble isoform is located before the membrane anchor exon. This specific exon contains an in frame TAA stop codon, followed by a polyadenylation signal. Hence, a normal splicing event leads to a soluble IL-5R alpha variant, whereas alternative splicing is required for cell membrane anchoring. A second area of alternative splicing is found in the 5' leader sequence, and possibly relates to the presence of short open reading frames preceding the main ATG. All intron-exon junctions meet the GT-AG rule. The gene structures of all cytokine/haematopoietin receptors documented so far have also been compared with respect to intron phasing. This shows that all introns between the FN-III-like modules are of the +1 type, but in addition, splice sites within the Cys-module and WS-WS-module are invariably of the +2 and 0 type, respectively.
    European cytokine network 01/1992; 3(5):451-9. · 1.90 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To obtain mAb against the murine IL-5R (mIL-5R), Wistar rats were immunized with B13 cells, a murine Ly-1+ (CD5+) pre-B cell line which is dependent on IL-3 or IL-5 for its growth. A first group of six mAb could immunoprecipitate, from detergent-lysed B13 cells, a 60-kDa polypeptide (p60) corresponding to the recently cloned mIL-5R alpha-chain. A second group of three mAb was able to immunoprecipitate a protein doublet of 130 to 140 kDa (p130 and p140) corresponding to the previously characterized mIL-3R and mIL-3R-like polypeptide, respectively. One mAb (25C9) specifically bound the p130 polypeptide only. Here we show that: 1) mAb directed against the mIL-5R p60 component completely block IL-5 binding; 2) mAb recognizing the p130-p140 doublet interfere with both IL-3 and IL-5 binding; 3) mAb recognizing p130-p140 block the high affinity binding of IL-5 and hence the high affinity mIL-5R consists of the association of the p60 and p130 and/or p140 component; 4) one particular mAb, 25C9, which binds only to the p130 polypeptide, interferes with only IL-3 binding, and has no effect on the binding of IL-5. These results on binding were corroborated by a biologic assay based on the cytokine-dependent proliferation of B13 cells. The results presented here support a model for the mIL-5R consisting of the alpha-chain (p60) associated with the p140 (IL-3R-like), whereas the p130 (IL-3R) is not involved in the IL-5R complex.
    The Journal of Immunology 12/1991; 147(10):3413-8. · 5.52 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: cDNA clones encoding two receptor proteins involved in the binding of human interleukin 5 (hIL5) have been isolated. A first class codes for an IL5-specific chain (hIL5R alpha). The major transcript of this receptor gene, as analyzed in both HL-60 eosinophilic cells and eosinophilic myelocytes grown from cord blood, encodes a secreted form of this receptor. This soluble hIL5R alpha has antagonistic properties. A second component of the hIL5R is found to be identical to the beta chain of the human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) high affinity receptor. The finding that IL5 and GM-CSF share a receptor subunit provides a molecular basis for the observation that these cytokines can partially interfere with each other's binding and have highly overlapping biological activities on eosinophils.
    Cell 10/1991; 66(6):1175-84. · 31.96 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The mouse interleukin-5 receptor (mIL-5R) consists of two components one of which, the mIL-5R alpha-chain, binds mIL-5 with low affinity. Recently we demonstrated that monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) recognizing the second mIL-5R beta-chain, immunoprecipitate a p130-140 protein doublet which corresponds to the mIL-3R and the mIL-3R-like protein, the latter chain for which so far no ligand has been identified. In this study we show that a high affinity mIL-5R can be reconstituted on COS1 cells by co-expression of the mIL-5R alpha-chain with the mIL-3R-like protein (beta-chain). Cross-linking of 125I-labeled mIL-5 to the COS1 cells co-transfected with both cDNAs revealed the same pattern as in B13 cells, i.e. two proteins of 60 and 130 kd which correspond to the low affinity mIL-5R alpha-chain and the mIL-3R-like protein, respectively. The dissociation rate of mIL-5 from this reconstituted high affinity site was lower than that of the low affinity site, whereas the association rate was unchanged. Nonetheless, the apparent dissociation constant (Kd) for this reconstituted receptor was still 10-fold higher than the Kd observed for B13 cells. Although the mIL-3R is greater than 90% homologous to the mIL-3R-like protein, no increase in affinity for mIL-5 was detected on COS1 cells co-transfected with the cDNAs for the mIL-5R alpha-chain and the mIL-3R protein.
    The EMBO Journal 09/1991; 10(8):2133-7. · 9.82 Impact Factor