Jyoti Arya

University of Colorado Hospital, Denver, Colorado, United States

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Publications (15)52.76 Total impact

  • International Journal of Radiation OncologyBiologyPhysics 10/2005; 63. DOI:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2005.07.321 · 4.18 Impact Factor
  • Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 04/2005; 19(3):278, 283-4, 287 passim. · 2.98 Impact Factor
  • Journal of the American College of Surgeons 11/2003; 197(4):605-8. DOI:10.1016/S1072-7515(03)00588-X · 4.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Each of our cells contains a complete copy of the genes required to create a whole organism. Thus, it was possible to clone Dolly from a single sheep epidermal cell, and we should be able to reconstruct a dinosaur from the genetic material buried in the mud of "Jurassic Park. " However, it is hard to believe that by adding water to the $ 5 worth of chemicals in a human, it is possible to create a human being. Although 30 000 instructions, or genes, sounds like a lot, the creation of a hand or a heart or a mind is still a daunting task. Our current genetic code is a lot like the King James Bible-both have evolved. The travails of Moses or Noah were initially "transcribed" by clerics into huge books safely stored in cathedral vaults. With frightening frequency, these imaginative priests "improved" the story as they wrote. The testaments were then "translated" into many languages to enhance access by many peoples. These translations were found, and the data enjoyed further incremental evolution. In eukaryotes, the functional DNA rarely leaves the safety of the nuclear cathedral vault. Traditionally, we have envisioned the Gideon messengers as transcribing reliable molecular copies and distributing them out to motel rooms. While chromosomes are made of double-stranded DNA comprising millions of nucleotide pairs, single-strand messenger RNA (mRNA) carries only single verses, requiring a nucleotide code of only 50 to several thousand nucleotides. Ribosomal RNA synthesizes protein from the mRNA script, while transfer RNA serves an adaptor role in converting the message to protein(1).
    Archives of Surgery 11/2003; 138(10):1145-7; discussion 1148. DOI:10.1001/archsurg.138.10.1145 · 4.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Host immune responses are unable to fully suppress HIV-1 replication in lymphoid tissues. Microanatomic relationships between HIV-1-producing cells and CD8+ cells in lymphoid tissues were analyzed to determine whether there was evidence for an immune privileged site or impaired recognition of virus-producing cells. CD8+ cell phenotypes were determined on disaggregated inguinal lymph node cells by flow cytometry for seven untreated HIV-1-infected subjects. Microanatomic relationships between HIV-1-producing cells and CD8+ cells were analyzed in lymph node sections from 15 HIV-1-infected individuals using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical staining. Most (median, 96%) lymph node CD8+ cells coexpressed CD3. Frequencies of virus-producing cells detected by in situ hybridization correlated with plasma HIV-1 RNA concentration (Spearman rho = 0.70; p =.02; n = 11). The percentage of lymph node cells adjacent to virus-producing cells that were CD8+ (median, 29%) was not statistically different from the percentage of CD8+ cells in lymphoid tissue overall (median, 34%; p =.09). Multiple explanations could account for the observation that CD8+ cells do not preferentially accumulate around virus-producing cells including the possibility that HIV-1-specific CD8+ cells cannot recognize virus-producing cells. Further studies are necessary to determine whether HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells aggregate around virus-producing cells in lymphoid tissue.
    JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes 05/2003; 32(5):469-76. · 4.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Host immune responses are unable to fully suppress HIV-1 replication in lymphoid tissues. Microanatomic relationships between HIV-1-producing cells and CD8(+) cells in lymphoid tissues were analyzed to determine whether there was evidence for an immune privileged site or impaired recognition of virus-producing cells. Methods: CD8(+) cell phenotypes were determined on disaggregated inguinal lymph node cells by flow cytometry for seven untreated HIV-1-infected subjects. Microanatomic relationships between HIV-1-producing cells and CD8(+) cells were analyzed in lymph node sections from 15 HIV-1-infected individuals using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical staining. Results: Most (median, 96%) lymph node CD8(+) cells coexpressed CD3. Frequencies of virus-producing cells detected by in situ hybridization correlated with plasma HIV-1 RNA concentration (Spearman rho = 0.70; p =.02; n = 11). The percentage of lymph node cells adjacent to virus-producing cells that were CD8(+) (median, 29%) was not statistically different from the percentage of CD8(+) cells in lymphoid tissue overall (median, 34%; p =.09). Conclusions: Multiple explanations could account for the observation that CD8(+) cells do not preferentially accumulate around virus-producing cells including the possibility that HIV-1-specific CD8(+) cells cannot recognize virus-producing cells. Further studies are necessary to determine whether HIV-1-specifc CD8(+) T cells aggregate around virus-producing cells in lymphoid tissue.
    JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes 04/2003; 32(5):469-476. DOI:10.1097/00126334-200304150-00001 · 4.39 Impact Factor
  • Journal of the American College of Surgeons 12/2002; 195(5):686-93. DOI:10.1016/S1072-7515(02)01309-1 · 4.45 Impact Factor
  • Archives of Surgery 12/2002; 137(11):1301-3. · 4.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fifteen years ago, an experimental effort to magnify a myocardial infarction, with preinfarction episodes of transient ischemia, proved paradoxically protective. In the ensuing years, surgeons have learned to discriminate a biochemical/metabolic/functional spectrum of cardiac states ranging from healthy myocardium to "stunned" or "hibernating" heart to the modes of "apoptotic" or "necrotic" cardiomyocyte death. It is now clear that "protective cardiac preconditioning" influences all of these cardiac states. The cellular mechanisms of preconditioning (PC) are now sufficiently understood to permit clinical application. Ligation of adrenergic, adenosine, bradykinin or opioid receptors involves signaling via both tyrosine and calcium-dependent protein kinases (PKC), which activate mitochondrial ATP-dependent potassium channels. Subsequently, the release of oxygen radicals induces nuclear translocation of transcriptional regulators, which transform the cardiomyocyte into a more resilient cell. Although preconditioning was initially recognized as protecting only against infarction, PC also limits postischemic dysrhythmias and enhances contractile function. Phase I (safety) and phase II (efficacy) clinical trials now persuasively support pharmacological preconditioning as a safe mode of preventing postcardiac surgical complications. Indeed, preconditioning is currently being proposed as adjunctive to hypothermic perfusates in protecting against the obligate organ ischemia during transplantation.
    Journal of Cardiac Surgery 11/2002; 17(6):536-42. DOI:10.1046/j.1540-8191.2002.01009.x · 0.89 Impact Factor
  • Archives of Surgery 11/2002; 137(11). DOI:10.1001/archsurg.137.11.1301 · 4.30 Impact Factor
  • Surgery 06/2002; 131(5):477-83. DOI:10.1067/msy.2002.121096 · 3.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: All cells maintain continuous communication. Hormones derive constitutively from specialized cells to effect total body homeostasis. Conversely, cytokines are produced sporadically from almost all nucleated cells in response to surgical ischemia/septic challenge. Surgical patients are a stew of pulsating cytokines, which serve as the language between all surgically stressed somatic and myeloid cells. Therapeutic manipulation of cytokines has already generated some exhilarating success stories and some crushing disappointments. This introduction to surgically relevant cytokines is presented with the conviction that cytokine-based therapies of surgical patients will (in the future) prove as beneficial to our patients as antibiotics have in the past.
    The American Journal of Surgery 04/2002; 183(3):268-73. DOI:10.1016/S0002-9610(02)00781-X · 2.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Low reconstruction rates after mastectomy for breast cancer raise questions about the impact of preoperative education. This study determines whether counseling about reconstruction influences the decision about reconstruction. The study was based on a prospectively collected database of breast cancer surgery. A total of 299 operations for breast cancer were performed. Of 127 mastectomies, 21 (16%) were not candidates. In all, 106 women were specifically educated about reconstruction; 40 (37%) women consulted with a plastic surgeon; and 22 (21%) women ultimately chose reconstruction. Forty women had the option of mastectomy or breast conservation. Twelve (30%) women accepted a consultation with a plastic surgeon. Six of these women (15%) ultimately chose reconstruction. Mastectomy was required in 66 women; 28 (42%) accepted a consultation with a plastic surgeon; 16 (24%) underwent reconstruction; 3 additional women are planning delayed reconstruction (28%). Reconstruction is more likely when mastectomy is required than when it is chosen. Low reconstruction rates reflect patient desire rather than access or education.
    The American Journal of Surgery 01/2002; 182(6):649-53. DOI:10.1016/S0002-9610(01)00788-7 · 2.41 Impact Factor
  • Surgery 05/2000; 127(4):361-2. DOI:10.1067/msy.2000.104741 · 3.11 Impact Factor
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    Surgery 05/2000; 127(4):366-9. DOI:10.1067/msy.2000.103163 · 3.11 Impact Factor