S Ozme

Hacettepe University, Ankara, Ankara, Turkey

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Publications (81)129.44 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Low threshold characteristics and mechanical stability are important features of an ideal pacing lead, especially for children. We report our experience and medium-term results with a steroid-eluting, active-fixation ventricular lead in children. Telectronics Accufix II DEC model 033-212 ventricular leads were implanted in 21 patients. Eighteen patients (11 male / 7 female; 10.6+/-4.0 years), who were followed for a mean period of 6.47 +/-1.13 years, were included in the study. Pacemaker mode was DDDR in three patients, and VVIR in the remaining 15 patients. Mean threshold value was 0.5 volts at implant, which increased to 0.7 volts in the first month (p>0.05). It remained stable (0.62-0.78 V) until 5.5 years (p>0.05), increased significantly at 5.5 years (0.99+/-0.63 V at 5.5 years, p<0.05) and remained significantly high after this time (p<0.05). Pacing lead impedance did not differ significantly throughout the study (p>0.05). Thirteen pulse generators reached end-of-life at > or =4 years. In all the patients whose generators were replaced (11 patients), the leads were kept in place. Steroid-eluting active-fixation ventricular leads have long service lives and low chronic stimulation threshold values, allowing lower outputs. These features may have advantages in pacing therapy of children.
    Anadolu kardiyoloji dergisi: AKD = the Anatolian journal of cardiology 12/2005; 5(4):278-82. · 0.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this report we describe an asymptomatic paced child with outer coil fracture of the bipolar screw-in steroid eluting ventricular lead without insulation defect, loss of ventricular capture and unexpected increase in lead impedance in the bipolar VVIR pace configuration. A previously unpublished method was performed to retract the helix and the lead. As a result, the fractured lead was successfully retrieved. We suggest that, this unusual extraction method can be tried as an alternative approach in the removal of an active fixation ventricular pacing lead with impaired mechanical function possibly due to fracture.
    Europace 05/2003; 5(2):185-7. · 2.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This prospective study aims to investigate the reproducibility of HUTT results in children with typical history of vasovagal syncope. Between October 1996 and October 1999, 58 children with a history of typical vasovagal syncope attacks were evaluated with head up tilt test (HUTT). The table was tilted to 60 degrees and the patients were monitored for heart rate and blood pressure changes during 45 min. No provocative agents were used. The test was repeated a week later at a similar setting. Of 58 patients, 39 had positive and 19 had negative response during the initial test. During the second test, the positive response was reproduced in 29 cases (50%), and the negative response was reproduced in 16 cases (28%). Ten patients (17%) with an initial positive test had a negative second test. A negative test became positive only in three patients (5%). There were 12 vasodepressor, four cardioinhibitor and 23 mixed responses among the initial tests. Only in four patients did the type of the response change from vasodepressor to a mixed type during the second test. The reproducibility of a positive tilt test was 74.4% (29/39), the negative tilt test was 84.2% (16/19), and the overall reproducibility of the HUTT was 77.6% (45/58). Unprovoked HUTT in children is reproducible when repeated on different days and similar settings and the results are comparable to the ones with adult patients.
    International Journal of Cardiology 04/2003; 88(1):19-25. · 6.18 Impact Factor
  • International Journal of Cardiology 04/2003; 88(1):101-2. · 6.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cardiopathy is an expected finding in X-linked Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies. This holds true for some other forms such as autosomal recessive limb-girdle dystrophies. However, data on early-onset and usually severe congenital muscular dystrophies are limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of cardiac involvement in children with merosin-positive congenital muscular dystrophy. A total of 42 patients and 22 healthy subjects were evaluated by M-mode, 2D, and Doppler echocardiography. Cardiac anatomy, left ventricular dimensions, wall thickness and systolic and diastolic functions were investigated in patients and compared with those of healthy control subjects. Mean left ventricular ejection fraction and shortening fraction were significantly lower in the patient group (P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively) and in three patients ejection fraction was below 55%. Although some impairments in left ventricular inflow indexes which were suggestive of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction were detected in patients with merosin-positive congenital muscular dystrophy they were not statistically significant. Our results suggest that left ventricular systolic abnormalities may occur in children with merosin-positive congenital muscular dystrophy.
    International Journal of Cardiology 02/2003; 87(2-3):129-33; discussion 133-4. · 6.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Dual chamber pacemakers (single chamber pacing dual chamber sensing cardiac pacemaker (VDD) and dual chamber pacing and sensing cardiac pacemaker (DDD)) are being used frequently in children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to verify the safety and performance of the VDD and DDD pacing systems, and to evaluate the differences between two pacing modes with regard to atrial sensing and tracking functions. In this study, we evaluated 14 patients with VDD pacing and 15 patients with DDD pacing between 1994 and 2000. In the patient group with VDD pacing, all had congenital or acquired atrioventricular (AV) block. In the patient group with DDD pacing, 11 had congenital or acquired AV block, three had sinus node dysfunction with AV conduction disturbance and one had idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis. Twenty-eight devices were implanted in the subpectoral area using the transvenous route. After implantation the atrial tracking capabilities of the pacing systems were analyzed by telemetry, Holter monitoring, and treadmill exercise testing. The mean age of patients in the VDD pacing group was younger. The percentage of congenital heart disease was higher in the DDD pacing group. There was no significant difference regarding fluoroscopy time during implantation and follow-up time between the two groups. During implantation, in the VDD pacing group the mean sensed atrial signal was 3.1 +/- 1.3 mV and this decreased to 1.37 +/- 0.68 mV (P < 0.05) during follow-up. This pattern was also observed in DDD group (3 +/- 2 mV vs 1.9 +/- 1.5 mV, P < 0.05). Although the P wave measurement at implantation did not differ between the two groups, it was significantly higher in the DDD pacing group at the last control. Three patients with VDD pacing were reprogrammed to VVI or single chamber pacing and sensing, rate adaptive cardiac pacemaker because of complete loss of AV synchrony. There was no atrial sensing problem in the DDD pacing group. During the follow-up, one patient with VDD pacing developed diaphragmatic stimulation and required lead revision. In one patient with DDD pacing, venous thrombosis occurred in the right subclavian vein and was treated with thrombolytic therapy. During treadmill exercise testing, in one patient with VDD and one patient with DDD pacing temporary failure of atrial sensing occurred. At 24 h Holter monitoring, intermittent loss of atrial sensing was documented in two patients with VDD pacing. Dual chamber pacing in children with DDD or VDD pacemakers is a suitable method for bradycardia treatment. Atrial sensing problems may occur in VDD pacemakers. Therefore, DDD pacing mode should be preferred whenever suitable for the patient to maintain the AV synchrony.
    Pediatrics International 01/2003; 44(6):635-40. · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study was designed to evaluate possible interactions between digital cellular telephones and implanted pacemakers in children. The study comprised 95 patients (53 males and 42 females) with a mean age of 11.5 +/- 4.6 years (range 1-22 years). The average time from pacemaker implantation was 2.5 years (range 1 month-12 years). Fourteen (15%) devices were dual chamber and the remaining were single chamber pacemakers. The following companies manufactured the pacemakers tested: Medtronic (n = 42), Telectronics (n = 9), Vitatron (n = 16), Pacesetter (n = 19), CPI (n = 8), and Biotronik (n = 1). All the patients were tested in the supine position during continuous ECG monitoring. After completion of the routine pacemaker check, the effects of the European Global system for mobile communication (GSM) was tested using two cellular telephone models (Ericsson GA 628 and Siemens S 25, 2-W power). For this purpose, atrial and ventricular sensitivity settings were programmed to the most sensitive values, and the tests were carried out in the unipolar and bipolar sensing modes. The evaluation was performed during ringing, switching on/off, and conversation phase with the cellular telephone positioned over the pulse generator and around the pacemaker pocket. A malfunction of the pacemaker was not observed in any patient. Only 1 (1%) of 95 patients showed a brief oversensing problem during calls with the cellular telephone. In this case, an AAIR pacemaker was implanted transvenously in a subcutaneous pocket and the sensing defect occurred only with the unipolar sensing mode and was not reproducible. Once the source of interference was removed, no sensing defect was detected and the patient remained asymptomatic. No symptoms were experienced in this study. The authors believe that pacemaker dependent patients with nonprotected pulse generators manufactured at the beginning of 1990s may be tested by their physicians for possible interferences before they use a digital cellular telephone.
    Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology 10/2002; 25(9):1328-30. · 1.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Arrhythmias are among the malignant causes of syncope. This study has been undertaken to determine the relative incidence and significance of dysrhythmia in the pathogenesis of syncope among patients referred to a pediatric cardiology unit. Between March 1997 and March 1999, 105 consecutive patients (59 female, 46 male) aged 11.5 +/- 3.6 years without neurologic or cardiac morphologic causes were evaluated for at least one episode of syncope. A pediatric cardiologist and a pediatric neurologist evaluated all the patients. Routine chest X-ray, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG), electroencephalography (EEG), 24-h Holter monitoring and echocardiography were carried out. When deemed necessary, further tests were undertaken for the cases of syncope which were unexplained by routine tests. The cause of syncope was identified as vasovagal in 25.7% (n = 27) and related to dysrhythmia in 30.5% (n = 32). The cause was migraine-associated syncope in two children, psychogenic syncope in three children and orthostatic hypotension in one patient. The cause was unknown in 36.2% (n = 38). We conclude that dysrhythmia is a significant and frequent cause in children referred to pediatric cardiology units. The combination of ECG, Holter monitoring, electrophysiologic study, transtelephonic ECG and head-up tilt test can identify the underlying cause of syncope in as many as 58% of these patients that present with syncope.
    Pediatrics International 09/2002; 44(4):358-62. · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is limited experience on sotalol use in the management of childhood arrhythmias. This study reviews the results of our experience with oral sotalol for treatment and prevention of tachyarrhythmias in children. The records of 62 patients (27 female, 35 male, mean age: 8.5+/-5.3 years) treated with sotalol for supraventricular or ventricular arrhythmias from 1994 to 1999 at our institution were reviewed. Demographic, clinical, echocardiographic, electrocardiographic (ECG), ambulatory ECG and electrophysiologic variables were collected. Forty-two (63.6%) patients had re-entrant supraventricular tachycardia, eight patients (12.9%) had atrial tachycardia, one patient (1.6%) had junctional ectopic tachycardia, four patients (6.5%) had ventricular tachycardia, and seven patients (11.3%) had complex ventricular arrhythmias, as evidenced by surface or ambulatory ECG records; or revealed during the electrophysiological study. The mean sotalol dose was 3.9+/-1.2 mg/kg per day. In 15.5+/-13.9 months of sotalol use 50% (n=31) had complete relief of symptoms and/or arrhythmia and 29% (n=18) had partial relief. Sotalol was ineffective in 20% (n=13). Sotalol was more effective in re-entrant type supraventricular tachycardias (P=0.012). Sotalol was the first choice in 35.5% of patients. The sotalol therapy was initiated in inpatient settings in 40.3% (25 patients). Complications due to sotalol were seen in six patients (five patients developed bradycardia/pauses, and one patient had torsades de pointes) for which the sotalol dose was modified. In patients with sick sinus syndrome, a pacemaker was implanted and in another patient sotalol was stopped. Sotalol, being an effective and safe drug particularly in children, is a good therapeutic alternative for the preventive treatment of childhood tachyarrhythmias.
    Pediatrics International 01/2002; 43(6):624-30. · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although active fixation ventricular leads seem to have advantages over passive fixation leads, this study compares the follow-up results of active and passive fixation leads in children. We evaluated the implantation and follow-up data of 41 children with active (Accufix II DEC, group 1) (n = 20) or passive (Membrane E, group 2) (n = 21) fixation, steroid-eluting ventricular leads. All but one of the patients in group 1 completed the 12-month follow-up. The mean follow-up period in group 2 was 10.4 +/- 2.9 months (range 3-12 months, median 12 months). In both groups the mean pacing threshold was measured as 0.51 +/- 0.09 V versus 0.48 +/- 0.15 V (P > 0.05) at 0.5-ms pulse width, mean R wave amplitude as 9.9 +/- 2.5 mV versus 9.4 +/- 3.2 mV (P > 0.05), and mean impedance as 557 +/- 92 omega versus 664 +/- 160 omega (P < 0.05), respectively, at implantation. After the first week of pacing, mean threshold values in group 1 were significantly lower than those of group 2 (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). During the follow-up period, lead impedance measurements did not show a significant difference between the two groups. In one patient from group 1, the lead (by unscrewing) was removed easily because of pacemaker pocket infection. No lead dislodgement or helix deformation occurred in group 1. Nevertheless, in one patient from group 2, the lead was extracted at 4-month postimplantation because of lead displacement. We conclude that the steroid-eluting active fixation lead (Accufix II DEC) have advantages of easier implantation and lower acute and chronic stimulation thresholds compared to the passive fixation lead (Membrane E). Therefore, Accufix II DEC is superior to Membrane E, and it is a better first choice in children with an implanted single chamber ventricular pacemaker.
    Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology 08/2000; 23(8):1245-9. · 1.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies constitute a broad range of clinical and genetic entities. We have evaluated 38 autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2) families by linkage analysis for the known loci of LGMD2A-F and protein studies using immunofluorescence and western blotting of the sarcoglycan complex. One index case in each family was investigated thoroughly. The age of onset and the current ages were between 11/2 and 15 years and 6 and 36 years, respectively. The classification of families was as follows: calpainopathy 7, dysferlinopathy 3, alpha sarcoglycan deficiency 2, beta sarcoglycan deficiency 7, gamma sarcoglycan deficiency 5, delta sarcoglycan deficiency 1, and merosinopathy 2. There were two families showing an Emery-Dreifuss phenotype and nine showing no linkage to the LGMD2A-F loci, and they had preserved sarcoglycans. gamma sarcoglycan deficiency seems to be the most severe group as a whole, whereas dysferlinopathy is the mildest. Interfamilial variation was not uncommon. Cardiomyopathy was not present in any of the families. In sarcoglycan deficiencies, sarcoglycans other than the primary ones may also be considerably reduced; however, this may not be reflected in the phenotype. Many cases of primary gamma sarcoglycan deficiency showed normal or only mildly abnormal delta sarcoglycan staining.
    Journal of Medical Genetics 06/2000; 37(5):361-7. · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present paper was to determine the factors related to sudden death in aortic stenosis. The factors related to sudden death were investigated in 40 asymptomatic children with mild and moderate aortic stenosis by treadmill testing. The QT interval of aortic stenosis cases were significantly longer than those of healthy children with increasing heart rates during exercise. A longer QT interval of aortic stenosis cases compared to normal children during exercise is the first sign of myocardial ischemia and leads to fatal ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death. For this reason we recommend that exercise testing should be performed frequently in aortic stenosis patients and that close follow up is necessary for patients with long QT segments that can be a marker for severe arrhythmias.
    Pediatrics International 03/2000; 42(1):48-52. · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although active fixation ventricular leads seem to have advantages over passive fixation leads, this study compares the follow-up results of active and passive fixation leads in children. We evaluated the implantation and follow-up data of 41 children with active (Ac-cufix II DEC, group 1) (n = 20) or passive (Membrane E, group 2) (n = 21) fixation, steroid-eluting ventricular leads. All but one of the patients in group 1 completed the 12-month follow-up. The mean follow-up period in group 2 was 10.4 ± 2.9 months (range 3–12 months, median 12 months). In both groups the mean pacing threshold was measured as 0.51 ± 0.09 V versus 0.48 ± 0.15 V (P > 0.05) at 0.5-ms pulse width, mean R wave amplitude as 9.9 ± 2.5 m V versus 9.4 ± 3.2 mV (P > 0.05), and mean impedance as 557 ± 92 Ω versus 664 ± 160 Ω (P < 0.05), respectively, at implantation. After the first week of pacing, mean threshold values in group 1 were significantly lower than those of group 2 (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). During the follow-up period, lead impedance measurements did not show a significant difference between the two groups. In one patient from group 1, the lead (by unscrewing) was removed easily because of pacemaker pocket infection. No lead dislodgement or helix deformation occurred in group 1. Nevertheless, in one patient from group 2, the lead was extracted at 4-month postimplantation because of lead displacement. We conclude that the steroid-eluting active fixation lead (Accufix II DEC) have advantages of easier implantation and lower acute and chronic stimulation thresholds compared to the passive fixation lead (Membrane E). Therefore, Accufix II DEC is superior to Membrane E, and it is a better first choice in children with an implanted single chamber ventricular pacemaker.
    Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology 01/2000; 23(8):1245-1249. · 1.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Holter monitoring (HM) is widely used in arrhythmic disorders of adult patients; however, studies in the pediatric age group are limited. This study aims to determine the value of HM in diagnosis and treatment of disorders related to arrhythmias in pediatric patients. We examined 2,017 Holter records of 1,500 children who applied to our institution between November 1994 and October 1998. The age ranged from 0-24 years (52% male, 48% female). The indications for HM were screening for arrhythmic symptoms (palpitation, chest pain, syncope) in 67 percent, monitoring dysrhythmic therapy in 17 percent, postoperative control in five percent, and pacemaker control in four percent. Palpitation is the leading presenting symptom, with more frequent findings of supraventricular extrasystole (SVE), supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), ventricular extrasystole (VE) and complete heart block (CHB) when compared to other symptoms. Only 5.3 percent of the patients had arrhythmic symptoms during monitoring and asymptomatic patients had more frequent arrhythmias. SVT, VE, and CHB are more frequent findings in the abnormal heart with previous cardiac operations. The diagnostic yield is low with arrhythmic symptoms in the pediatric age group; however, HM enables cumulative evaluation of heart rhythm and rhythm variability, which is important in diagnosing silent arrhythmias in high risk groups (abnormal heart, postoperative heart).
    The Turkish journal of pediatrics 01/2000; 42(4):286-93. · 0.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sick sinus syndrome is a rare cause of bradycardia in children without structural heart disease. A case of profound sinus bradycardia, sinus arrest with junctional escape, and pauses in a two-year-old infant with breath-holding and syncope episodes is presented. As a result of these clinical symptoms and electrocardiographic findings, the patient with sick sinus syndrome underwent implantation of transvenous ventricular pacemaker. He has been well and asymptomatic since the insertion of the pacemaker. In the differential diagnosis of an infant with breath-holding and syncope episodes, when these symptoms in particular cannot be explained by other common reasons, sick sinus syndrome should be kept in mind. This case also illustrates the importance of electrocardiographic studies for the diagnosis.
    The Turkish journal of pediatrics 01/2000; 42(4):338-40. · 0.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: CATCH 22 is a medical acronym for cardiac defects, abnormal facies, thymic hypoplasia, cleft palate, and hypocalcemia, and a variable deletion on chromosome 22q11. The deletion within the chromosome region of 22q11 may occur in patients with dysmorphologic and cardiological syndromes: DiGeorge syndrome (DGS), velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), and conotruncal anomaly face syndrome (CAFS). In this study, using N25 (D22S75) DiGeorge chromosome region probe. fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses were performed on 32 patients with congenital heart diseases. Twenty-nine of 32 patients had conotruncal heart disease. A 22q11 deletion was detected in two patients (6.9%) of the 29 patients with conotruncal heart disease. One of our 22qdel (+) patients had unilateral facial nerve palsy. Although it is not a frequent finding, unilateral facial nerve palsy will be included among the symptoms of CATCH 22 syndrome. After careful clinical evaluation of patients with conotruncal cardiac anomalies, only syndromic cases should be screened for this deletion.
    The Turkish journal of pediatrics 01/2000; 42(3):215-8. · 0.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We analyzed the clinical and genetic aspects of 28 FRDA patients from 20 families. 19 families were consanguineous. The onset was between 4 and 13 1/2 years of age (mean 15.4 +/- 6.2). Three patients presented with cardiomyopathy, one with weakness, and the rest with ataxia. There were two patients with preserved lower-limb deep tendon reflexes. Sensory nerve action potentials were reduced in 14/14 patients. Cardiac echograms were abnormal in 17/19 cases, and this was between 6 and 16 years of age (mean 10.1 +/- 3.5). Four families were multiplex. Clinical intra-familial variability was observed. Increased GAA repeats of the X25 gene were found in 27/28 patients studied, all in a homozygous state. 88.9% of patients had a smaller allele larger than 500 repeats, and 66.7% had more than 700 repeats. The patient who did not have increased GAA repeats in both alleles had peculiar findings. Significant correlation of expansion was obtained for the early onset, and cardiomyopathy as the onset.
    Neuropediatrics 05/1999; 30(2):72-6. · 1.19 Impact Factor
  • A Celiker, N Ceviz, S Ozme
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    ABSTRACT: Experience with pediatric use of intravenous amiodarone is limited. In this study, our experiences with intravenous amiodarone in children with acute life-threatening or chronic tachyarrhythmias are reviewed. Twelve patients, with a mean age of 3.4 +/- 3.1 years, range 9 months-10 years (two with incessant ventricular tachycardia, one with ectopic atrial tachycardia, two with atrioventricular re-entrant tachycardia (three episodes), four with postoperative or congenital junctional ectopic tachycardia, two with bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome, one with atrial tachycardia) were treated with intravenous amiodarone during 13 tachycardia episodes. Left ventricular systolic functions were depressed in six patients. In 11 patients, a median of two drugs (range one-four), including adenosine infusion and in five cases direct current cardioversion were tried without success prior to intravenous amiodarone. The loading dose of amiodarone was 5 mg/kg in all episodes, infused over 1 h. Maintenance infusion was required in 12 episodes. In 10 episodes (77%), amiodarone was considered effective, in one (7.6%) partially effective (junctional ectopic tachycardia) and in two (15.4%) ineffective (sick sinus syndrome, atrial tachycardia). Therapeutic effect was obtained in a median period of 30 h (range 1-103 h). The mean effective maintenance dose was 10 +/- 4.7 micrograms/kg per min (range 5-15 micrograms/kg per min). In one patient, mild hypotension, and in three patients cellulitis occurred, but none of them necessitated termination of treatment. Intravenous amiodarone is found to be an effective and safe antiarrhythmic agent for children with acute life-threatening and chronic tachyarrhythmias and depressed left ventricular systolic functions.
    Acta paediatrica Japonica; Overseas edition 01/1999; 40(6):567-72.
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    ABSTRACT: Rate adaptive pacemakers are used to achieve a better cardiac performance during exercise by increasing the heart rate and cardiac output. The ideal rate adaptive sensor should be able to mimic sinus node modulation under various degrees of exercise and other metabolic needs. Minute ventilation sensing has proven to be one of the most accurate sensor systems. In this study, alterations in sinus rhythm and pacing rates during daily life conditions in 11 children (median age 11 years, range 6-14 years) with minute ventilation single chamber pacemakers were investigated. Correlation of sinus rhythm with pacing rates was assessed. ECG records were obtained from 24-hour Holter monitoring. Average rates of five consecutive P waves and pace waves were determined every half hour. The average of the two values was then used to determine hourly rates. Correlation coefficients between the sinus rhythm and pacing rates were calculated. In nine patients, pacing rates correlated well to sinus rhythm (range 0.6793-0.9558, P < 0.001 and P < 0.05), whereas in two cases correlation was not sufficient (P > 0.05). Most of the patients, in whom rate response factor (RRF) measurements during peak exercise by treadmill with chronotropic assessment exercise protocol were performed and pacemakers were programmed to these parameters, had more appropriate ventricular rates compared to spontaneous sinus rates. In these patients mean RRF value was 15.3 +/- 2.7 (range 12-20, median 15). This study shows that during daily activities minute ventilation rate adaptive pacemakers can achieve pacing rates well correlated to sinus rhythm that reflects the physiological heart rate in children.
    Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology 12/1998; 21(11 Pt 1):2100-4. · 1.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tachyarrhythmias are common rhythm disturbances in infants and children. Despite the availability of diagnostic criteria arrhythmias are sometimes commonly misdiagnosed. Recent reports suggest that an endogenous purine nucleoside, adenosine, has a diagnostic effect in narrow QRS complex tachycardias, in addition to terminating supraventricular tachycardia involving the atrioventricular node. This report reviews the authors' experience with the use of adenosine for diagnosis of narrow and wide complex tachyarrhythmias in children. Adenosine was administered to 43 patients with several types of tachyarrhythmias (mean age, 8.3 +/- 5.24 years). Nineteen patients had structural or acquired heart disease. Of the 43 patients there were 28 (65%) several different types of narrow QRS complex tachycardia and 14 (33%) ventricular arrhythmias. One patient (2%) had long QT. Adenosine terminated supraventricular tachycardia, in 11 of 12 patients (92%), ventricular tachycardia in five of eight patients (63%), and transiently terminated premature ventricular contractions in two of six patients (33%). The diagnostic ability of adenosine was perfect in eight supraventricular tachycardia. In these eight cases the tachycardia mechanism was unclear before the administration of adenosine, which demonstrated three cases of sinus tachycardia, three of atrial flutter, one of atrial fibrillation and one of atrial fibrilloflutter. Confirmation of the primary diagnosis by adenosine was perfect in five tachyarrhythmias including three cases of atrial flutter, one of atrial fibrillation and one of ectopic atrial tachycardia. The average effective dose of adenosine was 212 micrograms/kg (range, 100-400 micrograms/kg). There were no serious side-effects except transient dyspnea, chest pain and flushing. These findings demonstrate adenosine to be helpful and safe in the diagnosis of tachyarrhythmias.
    Acta paediatrica Japonica; Overseas edition 11/1997; 39(5):570-7.

Publication Stats

372 Citations
129.44 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1990–2005
    • Hacettepe University
      • • Department of Pediatric Cardiology
      • • Department of Pediatrics
      • • Department of Cardiology
      Ankara, Ankara, Turkey
  • 2003
    • Uludag University
      • Division of Paedeatric Cardiology
      Bursa, Bursa, Turkey
  • 2000
    • Baskent University
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Ankara, Ankara, Turkey