F Doyon

Institut de Cancérologie Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, Ile-de-France, France

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Publications (37)97.63 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background: To investigate differentiated thyroid cancer risk factors in natives of French Polynesia is of interest because of the very high incidence of this cancer in the archipelago. Materials and Methods: To assess the role of various potential risk factors of thyroid cancer in the natives of French Polynesia we performed a case-control study. The study included almost all the French Polynesians diagnosed with differentiated thyroid carcinoma between 1981 and 2003 (n=229) and 373 French Polynesian control individuals from the general population without cancer. Results: Thyroid radiation dose received from nuclear fallout before the age of 15, a personal history of neck or/and head medical irradiation, obesity, tallness, large number of children, an artificial menopause, a familial history of thyroid cancer, a low dietary iodine intake, and having a spring as the main source of drinking water were found to be significant risk factors. No roles of smoking habits, alcohol consumption, iodine containing drugs, and exposure to pesticides were evidenced. Conclusions: Except for smoking, differentiated thyroid carcinoma risk factors in natives of French Polynesia are similar to those in other populations. Our finding on the role of having a spring as a drinking water origin is coherent with some other studies and could be due to geological factors.
    Asian Pacific journal of cancer prevention: APJCP 03/2014; 15(6):2675-80. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: French Polynesia has one of the world's highest thyroid cancer incidence rates. A case-control study among native residents of French Polynesia included 229 cases of differentiated thyroid cancer diagnosed between 1979 and 2004, and 371 population controls. Dietary patterns and goitrogenic food consumption (cabbage, cassava) were analyzed. We used a factor analysis to identify dietary patterns and a conditional logistic regression analysis to investigate the association between dietary patterns or food items and thyroid cancer risk. Two distinct dietary patterns were identified: traditional Polynesian and Western. A nonsignificant inverse association was observed between the traditional Polynesian dietary pattern and thyroid cancer risk. The Western pattern was not associated with thyroid cancer risk. Cassava consumption was significantly associated with a decreased risk of thyroid cancer. In conclusion, a traditional Polynesian dietary pattern led to a weak reduced risk of thyroid cancer in French Polynesia. The protective effect of cassava on this cancer does not seem to be substantially different from that of cabbage, which was the main goitrogenic food studied to date.
    Nutrition and Cancer 10/2012; 64(7):929-36. · 2.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: French Polynesia has one of the world's highest thyroid cancer incidence rates. Iodine is suspected to play a role in this high incidence. The objective of this study was to assess whether low dietary iodine is related to a higher risk of thyroid cancer in the French Polynesian population. A case-control study was performed among native residents of French Polynesia. It included 229 cases of differentiated thyroid cancer diagnosed between 1979 and 2004 (203 women, 26 men) matched with 371 population controls (324 women, 47 men) on the date of birth. The current study is focused on dietary iodine intake and fish consumption (food rich in iodine) and analyzed by conditional logistic regression. Daily dietary iodine intake was insufficient (<150 μg/day) in 60% of both cases and controls. A decreased risk of thyroid cancer was observed with a higher consumption of fish (p(trend)=0.008) and shellfish (p(trend)=0.002), and also with a higher dietary iodine intake (p(trend)=0.03). There was no significant interaction between the effects of the thyroid radiation dose and the dietary iodine intake (p=0.2). French Polynesia is a mild iodine deficiency area in which a higher consumption of food from the sea and a higher dietary iodine intake are significantly associated with a decreased risk of thyroid cancer. The quantification of this reduction requires specific investigation of iodine intake in traditional Polynesian food.
    Thyroid: official journal of the American Thyroid Association 01/2012; 22(4):422-9. · 2.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine therapy-related risk factors for the development of melanoma after hemangioma. A cohort study was conducted among 4620 patients treated before 16 years of age for skin hemangioma in France. A nested case-control study was also conducted on 13 patients who developed a melanoma (cases) matched with five controls in cohort according to sex, age at the hemangioma diagnostic, the calendar year of occurrence of the hemangioma, and follow-up. The radiation dose received at the site of the melanoma and at the same site in controls was estimated, and named 'local dose'. A total of 13 melanomas were registered during an average follow-up of overall 35 years, the risk of developing melanoma after a hemangioma treatment was 2.5-fold higher [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.4-4.1] compared with that of the general population, this ratio being only 0.8 (95% CI: 0.05-3.6) in 896 patients who did not receive radiotherapy, but 3.0 (95% CI: 1.6-5.1) after radiotherapy. When adjusting on sex, age, and year of the treatment and follow-up duration, melanoma risk was 11.9 (95% CI: 1.4-123) times higher in patients treated with ytrium 90 than in the ones who did not received radiotherapy. In the case-control study, the risk of melanoma was not linked to the local radiation dose. Indeed, the increase in melanoma risk was observed even for very low local doses. Compared with the corresponding skin areas in patients who did not receive radiotherapy, the ones having received less than 0.001 Gy had a melanoma risk of 3.9 (95% CI: 0.5-32) and those who received more than 0.01 Gy had a risk of 6.9 (0.5-99). This study suggests that radiation therapy of skin hemangioma increases the risk of further melanoma, but we were not able to evidence a relation with the local dose. Nevertheless, childhood treated for hemangioma should be considered at risk for developing melanoma and suspicious pigmented lesions should be carefully evaluated even far from treated areas.
    Melanoma research 11/2011; 22(1):77-85. · 2.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A cohort study was performed to investigate the carcinogenic effect of treatment of skin hemangioma with ionizing radiation in early childhood. This paper presents the incidence of breast cancer (BC) in this cohort and its association with radiotherapy. In an incidence study, 3,316 women treated for a skin hemangioma between 1941 and 1977 at the Institut Gustave-Roussy were included, among whom 2,697 had received radiotherapy. The mean age at first exposure was 0.7 years, and the mean absorbed dose to the breast was 70 mGy. Treatment reconstruction and the estimation of radiation doses delivered to the breast were obtained for 92% of the women who had received radiotherapy. External and internal analyses were performed. During an average follow-up of 35 years, a total of 17 women developed an invasive BC, compared to 7.5 expected in the French general population (SIR = 2.3, 95% CI, 1.4-3.5), and the absolute excess risk strongly increased with attained age. Compared to individuals with no radiotherapy, the risk of BC increased with increasing radiation dose with RRs of 3.2, 6.3, and 8.0 for dose categories of >0-10, 10-100, and >100 mGy, respectively; however, dose-response relationship was not significant. This study confirms that radiation treatment performed in the past for hemangioma during childhood increases the risk of BC.
    Cancer Causes and Control 11/2010; 21(11):1807-16. · 3.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: New Caledonia and French Polynesia have among of the world highest thyroid cancer incidence rates. Studies have demonstrated a relationship between anthropometric parameters and the prevalence of cancer. In this study we evaluated further the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and other anthropometric parameters on the incidence of thyroid cancer in the New Caledonia and French Polynesia populations. We performed a pooled analysis of two case-control studies in New Caledonia and French Polynesia. We included a total of 554 cases (65 men and 489 women) of differentiated thyroid cancers and 776 population control subjects matched on sex, age, and study. Anthropometric factors (height, weight, BMI, body fat percentage [BF%], and body surface area [BSA]), at age 18 and before diagnosis, were analyzed by conditional logistic regression, adjusting for other independent risk factors. A high proportion of cases (73%) were overweight (25-29.9 kg/m(2)) or obese (≥30 kg/m(2)) before diagnosis of thyroid cancer (against 57% of control subjects). An increased risk of thyroid cancer was observed with greater height, weight, BMI, BF%, and BSA. The association of thyroid cancer risk with height, weight, BMI, and BF% did not remain when adjustment was made for BSA. By comparison, the odds ratios for the highest versus the lowest quartile of BSA at age 18 were 3.97 (95% confidence interval, 2.57-6.15; p < 0.001) for women and 4.06 (95% confidence interval, 1.03-16.06; p = 0.04) for men. The association between thyroid cancer risk and each of anthropometric factors did not depend on tumor size or menopausal status before diagnosis. Among anthropometric factors, BSA plays a dominant role in thyroid cancer risk and explains the apparent role of BMI.
    Thyroid: official journal of the American Thyroid Association 10/2010; 20(11):1285-93. · 2.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Between 1966 and 1974, France conducted 41 atmospheric nuclear tests in Polynesia, but their potential health effects have not previously been investigated. In a case-control study, we compared the radiation exposure of almost all the French Polynesians diagnosed with differentiated thyroid carcinoma between 1981 and 2003 (n=229) to the exposure of 373 French Polynesian control individuals without cancer from the general population. Radiation exposures were estimated using measurements after the nuclear tests, age at time of each test, residential and dietary information. The average thyroid dose before 15 years of age was about 1.8 mGy, and 5% of the cases and 3% of the controls received a dose above 10 mGy. Despite this low level of dose, and after adjusting for ethnic group, level of education, body surface area, family history of thyroid cancer and number of pregnancies for women, we observed an increasing risk (P=0.04) of thyroid cancer with increasing thyroid dose received before age of 15 years, which remained after excluding non-aggressive differentiated thyroid micro-carcinomas. This increase of risk per unit of thyroid radiation dose was higher (P=0.03) in women who later experienced four or more pregnancies than among other women. The risk estimate is low, but is based on limited exposure data. The release of information on exposure, currently classified, would greatly improve the reliability of the risk estimation.
    British Journal of Cancer 09/2010; 103(7):1115-21. · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Differentiated thyroid carcinoma is considered to be the nonhereditary cancer for which familial inheritance is the highest. To date, no familial aggregation analysis of this cancer has been performed in Maohi populations, which exhibit a very high incidence rate. Therefore, we evaluate the risk of differentiated thyroid cancer associated with a family history of thyroid cancer in natives of French Polynesia. Methods: We investigated thyroid cancer incidence in the first-degree relatives of 225 cases of differentiated thyroid carcinomas diagnosed between 1979 and 2004 in patients born in French Polynesia, and 368 randomly selected population controls matched for sex and age, born and residing in French Polynesia. All but five thyroid cancers declared among relatives were validated. Results: Twenty-four cases declared a family history of thyroid cancer, when compared with 11 controls. Individuals with an affected first-degree relative had a 4.5-fold (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9-10.6) increased risk of differentiated thyroid cancer. This odds ratio (OR) was not significantly higher when a male first-degree relative was affected (OR, 10.0; 95% CI, 1.3-74.8) compared with a female (OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.5-10.3) and was not different for patients who had a nonaggressive thyroid microcarcinoma (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 0.6-16.4) than those who had a larger cancer (OR, 6.0; 95% CI, 1.8-20.5). This OR was borderline significantly (p, 0.07) higher in Maohis (OR, 11.0; 95% CI, 2.4-48.8) than in individuals of mixed origin (OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 0.8-5.9). Conclusion: Our study shows that the familial inheritance of differentiated thyroid cancer is particularly high in Maohi populations.
    Thyroid: official journal of the American Thyroid Association 04/2010; 20(4):393-400. · 2.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to assess the role of treatment in long-term overall and cardiovascular mortality after childhood cancer. We studied 4,122 5-year survivors of a childhood cancer diagnosed before 1986 in France and the United Kingdom. Information on chemotherapy was collected, and the radiation dose delivered to the heart was estimated for 2,870 patients who had received radiotherapy. After 86,453 person-years of follow-up (average, 27 years), 603 deaths had occurred. The overall standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was 8.3-fold higher (95% CI, 7.6-fold to 9.0-fold higher) in relation to the general populations in France and the United Kingdom. Thirty-two patients had died as a result of cardiovascular diseases (ie, 5.0-fold [95% CI, 3.3-fold to 6.7-fold] more than expected). The risk of dying as a result of cardiac diseases (n = 21) was significantly higher in individuals who had received a cumulative anthracycline dose greater than 360 mg/m(2) (relative risk [RR], 4.4; 95% CI, 1.3 to 15.3) and in individuals who received an average radiation dose that exceeded 5 Gy (RR, 12.5 and 25.1 for 5 to 14.9 Gy and > 15 Gy, respectively) to the heart. A linear relationship was found between the average dose of radiation to the heart and the risk of cardiac mortality (estimated excess [corrected] RR at 1 Gy, 60%). This study is the first, to our knowledge, to establish a relationship between the radiation dose received by the heart during radiotherapy for a childhood cancer and long-term cardiac mortality. This study also confirms a significant excess risk of cardiac mortality associated with a high cumulative dose of anthracyclines.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 02/2010; 28(8):1308-15. · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A cohort study was performed to investigate the carcinogenic effect of treating skin hemangioma with ionizing radiation during early childhood. This paper presents the incidence of differentiated thyroid adenomas and carcinomas after radiotherapy in this cohort. Of a total of 8307 patients treated for a skin hemangioma between 1940 and 1973 at the Institut Gustave-Roussy, 4767 were included in an incidence study, among whom 3795 had received radiotherapy. Seventy-three percent were less than 1-year-old at the time of treatment. External radiotherapy, Radium 226, Strontium 90, Yttrium 90, and Phosphorus 32 were used. The radiation dose received by the thyroid during radiotherapy, estimated in 3497 of the 3795 patients using specific software, was 41 mGy on average. Thyroid tumor cases were obtained by sending out a questionnaire, and were verified in pathological reports. Estimates of thyroid cancer specific incidence rates in the French population were obtained from the French cancer registry network. External and internal analyses were performed. During an average follow-up of 35 years, 11 patients developed a differentiated thyroid carcinoma and 44 a thyroid adenoma. The incidence of thyroid adenoma was found to be higher among taller and heavier individuals. The incidence of both thyroid carcinoma and adenoma was higher among non-smoker patients. A significant dose-response relationship was found between the radiation dose received by thyroid and the risk of thyroid cancer (Excess Relative Risk per GY, ERR/Gy: 14.7, 95%CI: 1.6-62.9) and of adenoma (ERR/Gy: 5.7, 95%CI: 0.7-19.4). This study confirms that radiation treatment performed in the past for hemangioma during infancy increased the risk of thyroid carcinoma and adenoma. Patients treated with external radiotherapy or with Radium 226 applicators for hemangiomas have to be more specifically followed up because this is the subgroup in whom the highest doses were received by the thyroid gland (more than 90% of the radiation doses were higher than 100 mGy). They are therefore more at risk of developing thyroid cancer.
    Radiotherapy and Oncology 07/2009; 93(2):377-82. · 4.52 Impact Factor
  • S Guérin, F Doyon, C Hill
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    ABSTRACT: In 2006, a total number of 149,000 cancer deaths were observed in France, 88,500 in the male population and 60,500 in the female population. In 2005, the number of new diagnoses of cancer is estimated to be 319,000, 183,000 among men and 136,000 among women. Age-standardised mortality rates are decreasing for most frequent cancer sites, at least in recent years, the main exceptions being lung in the female population, and pancreas in both male and female populations. Age-standardised incidence rate has increased by 38% between 1980 and 2005, when one takes demographic changes into account. This trend is the consequence of the increase in prostate cancer incidence among men and mostly of the increases in breast and lung cancers incidence, among women.
    Bulletin du cancer 03/2009; 96(1):51-7. · 0.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: French Polynesia has one of the world's highest thyroid cancer incidence rates. A case-control study among native residents of French Polynesia included 219 cases of differentiated thyroid cancers diagnosed between 1979 and 2004 (195 women/24 men) matched with 359 population controls (315 women/44 men) on the date of birth. Anthropometric factors were analyzed by conditional logistic regression. The risk of thyroid cancer for women in the highest quartile of body mass index (BMI) before diagnosis and at age 18 was 2.3-fold higher (95% CI, 1.1-4.7 p = 0.04) and 2.3-fold higher (95% CI, 1.2-4.4 p < 0.01), respectively, compared with the lowest. Women who were overweight (BMI = 25-29.9 kg/m2) or obese (BMI > or = 30 kg/m2) at age 18 and before diagnosis had an increased risk compared with those with a normal lifelong weight (OR = 6.2; 95% CI, 2.5-15.5 p < 0.01). Results for excess weight appeared in similar directions for men, although the number of cases was too small to provide reliable estimates. Height was positively associated with thyroid cancer among men and women. This study shows the role of excess body weight, especially if the onset is during early adulthood, and elevated height in the risk of differentiated thyroid cancer in populations born in French Polynesia.
    Cancer Causes and Control 12/2008; 20(5):581-90. · 3.20 Impact Factor
  • Revue d Épidémiologie et de Santé Publique 09/2008; 56(5):298-298. · 0.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Forty-one atmospheric nuclear weapons tests (plus five safety tests) were conducted in French Polynesia between 1966 and 1974. To evaluate the potential role of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing on a high incidence of thyroid cancer observed since 1985 in French Polynesia, a population-based case-control study was performed. The study included 602 subjects, either cases or controls, all aged less than 40 y at the end of nuclear weapons testing in 1974. Radiation doses to the thyroids of the study subjects were assessed based on the available historical results of radiation measurements. These were mainly found in the annual reports on the radiological situation in French Polynesia that had been sent to the UNSCEAR Secretariat. For each atmospheric nuclear weapons test that contributed substantially to the local deposition of radionuclides, the radiation dose to the thyroid from I intake was estimated. In addition, thyroid doses from the intake of short-lived radioiodines (132I, 133I, 135I) and 132Te, external exposure from gamma-emitted radionuclides deposited on the ground, and ingestion of long-lived Cs were reconstructed. The mean thyroid dose among the study subjects was found to be around 3 mGy while the highest dose was estimated to be around 40 mGy. Doses from short-lived iodine and tellurium isotopes ranged up to 10 mGy. Thyroid doses from external exposure ranged up to 3 mGy, while those from internal exposure due to cesium ingestion did not exceed 1 mGy. The dose estimates that have been obtained are based on a rather limited number of radiation measurements performed on a limited number of islands and are highly uncertain. A thorough compilation of the results of all radiation monitoring that was performed in French Polynesia in 1966-1974 would be likely to greatly improve the reliability and the precision of the dose estimates.
    Health Physics 06/2008; 94(5):418-33. · 1.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: French Polynesia has one of the world's highest incidence rates of thyroid cancer. A case-control study among native residents of French Polynesia included 201 women diagnosed with differentiated thyroid cancer before the age of 56 years, between 1981 and 2004, matched to 324 population controls on date of birth. Face-to-face interviews were conducted from 2002 to 2004. Odds ratios were calculated by using conditional logistic regression and were reported in the total group and by ethnic group ("Polynesian" vs. "mixed"). The risk of thyroid cancer increased with natural (odds ratio = 1.9) or artificial (odds ratio = 4.5) menopause compared with that associated with a premenopausal status and with number of births (p for trend = 0.03): odds ratios for one, two, three, four or five, six or seven, and eight or more births were, respectively, 0.90, 1.6, 2.3, 2.2, 2.7, and 1.7 compared with a nulliparous status. Similar results were observed for Polynesian women. No association was observed with irregular menstrual cycles, age at menopause, history of miscarriage or induced abortion, time since last birth, age at and outcome of first pregnancy, or breastfeeding. This study confirms the role of menstrual and reproductive factors in the risk of differentiated thyroid cancer in Pacific island populations.
    American journal of epidemiology 02/2008; 167(2):219-29. · 5.59 Impact Factor
  • Revue D Epidemiologie Et De Sante Publique - REV EPIDEMIOL SANTE PUBL. 01/2008; 56(5):287-287.
  • Radioprotection 01/2008; 43(5). · 0.44 Impact Factor
  • Radioprotection 01/2008; 43(5). · 0.44 Impact Factor
  • Epidemiology 01/2006; 17. · 5.74 Impact Factor
  • Epidemiology. 01/2006; 17.

Publication Stats

300 Citations
97.63 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1990–2011
    • Institut de Cancérologie Gustave Roussy
      • Department of Radiotherapy
      Villejuif, Ile-de-France, France
  • 2010
    • French Institute of Health and Medical Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2008
    • National Institutes of Health
      • International Centers for Research on CAM
      Bethesda, MD, United States
  • 2005–2008
    • Unité Inserm U1077
      Caen, Lower Normandy, France