Mary Carter

Renal Research Institute, New York City, New York, United States

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Publications (24)63.08 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background: Bioimpedance (BI) is maturing as a clinical technique for assessing fluid volume status. The aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity of four BI methods to detect changes in fluid status in hemodialysis patients. Methods: Forty-five patients were studied twice in the same week, i.e. once after the long and short interdialytic intervals, respectively. The four BI methods used were: (a) calf normalized resistivity (CNR) at a 5-kHz frequency, (b) whole-body multifrequency BI spectroscopy (MF-BIS) to estimate the normal hydration weight (NHWWBM), (c) whole-body MF-BIS to estimate the ratio of extracellular volume to total body water (wECV/wTBW), and (d) whole-body single-frequency (50 kHz) BI analysis to compute the ratio of ECV (sfECV) to TBW (sfTBW). Results: The relationship (slope of the regressive line) between relative changes (%) in the above mentioned four BI parameters and differences in weight (kg) was most pronounced with CNR (5.2 ± 1.6%/kg), followed by wECV/wTBW (1.7 ± 0.7%/kg) and NHWWBM (0.73 ± 0.2%/kg). Changes in sfECV/sfTBW and differences in weight were not correlated. Conclusions: CNR is more sensitive than whole-body BIS for detecting differences in fluid status. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.
    Blood Purification 02/2014; 37(1):48-56. · 2.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Developing sustainable treatment programs for kidney failure in most countries of sub-Saharan Africa continues to remain an imposing challenge. While long-term renal replacement therapies in end-stage renal disease appear beyond national financial capabilities, there exist opportunities for a short-term and affordable treatment of acute kidney injury (AKI). Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is an effective and simpler modality compared to hemodialysis (HD) and can be performed without the need for machinery or electricity, making it an ideal choice in a low-resource setting. Methods: Since cost of treatment is the major obstacle, the goal is to develop a program that is cost effective. Developing an HD program requires a large capital investment by the hospital, needing water treatment systems and machinery and providing for their ongoing repair and maintenance. Gravity-driven PD is a simple, effective modality and can be performed in low-resource locales. Results: In a pediatric program that we started in the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Kumasi, Ghana, 28 patients have been treated with PD for AKI so far. Half of them were treated successfully and were discharged having fully recovered kidney function. Seven patients (25%) were determined to have end-stage renal disease, whereas 7 others (25%) died during hospitalization. In these cases, late presentation for dialysis may have contributed to the inability to recover. Conclusion: For individuals and governments alike, who are concerned about the cost of providing or paying for dialysis, using PD to treat AKI is an effective and simpler modality compared to HD and can be performed without the need for machinery or electricity, making it an ideal choice in a low-resource setting. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.
    Blood Purification 01/2013; 36(3-4):226-30. · 2.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Various biochemical and physiological variables are related to outcome in hemodialysis (HD) patients. However, the prognostic implications of trends in body temperature (BT) in this population have not yet been studied. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between trends in BT and outcome in incident HD patients. Six thousand seven hundred and forty-two incident HD patients without thyroid disease from the Renal Research Institute were followed for 1 year. Patients were divided into tertiles of initial pre-dialysis BT (Tertile 1: ≤ 36.47°C, Tertile 2: > 36.47 to 36.71°C and Tertile 3: > 36.7°C) and further classified according to the change in BT (increased: > 0.01°C/month, decreased: less than -0.01°C/month and stable, with change between - 0.01 and + 0.01°C/month) during the first year of treatment. The reference group is Tertile 2 of initial temperature with stable BT. Cox regression was used for survival analyses. Analyses were repeated for patients who survived the first year and were treated for ≥ 1 month in Year 2. BT decreased in 2903 patients, remained stable in 2238 patients and increased in 1601 patients. After adjustment for multiple risk factors, hazard ratios (HRs) for mortality were higher for those groups in whom, irrespective of the initial BT, BT increased or declined, as compared to the reference group during follow-up (HR between 1.46 and 2.27). The best survival was observed in the group with the highest BT at baseline and stable BT during the follow-up period (HR 0.50).
    Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 05/2012; 27(8):3255-63. · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Data on the burden of acute kidney injury (AKI) in resource-poor countries such as Tanzania are minimal because of a lack of nephrology services and an inability to recognize and diagnose AKI with any certainty. In the few published studies, high morbidity and mortality are reported. Improved nephrology care and dialysis may lower the mortality from AKI in these settings. Hemodialysis is expensive and technically challenging in resource-limited settings. The technical simplicity of peritoneal dialysis and the potential to reduce costs if consumables can be made locally, present an opportunity to establish cost-effective programs for managing AKI. Here, we document patient outcomes in a pilot peritoneal dialysis program established in 2009 at a referral hospital in Northern Tanzania.
    Peritoneal dialysis international : journal of the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis. 05/2012; 32(3):261-6.
  • Kidney International 02/2012; 81(4):331-3. · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The literature abounds with attestations about the lack of treatment programs for kidney injury in developing countries. To date, no sustainable treatment program exists for acute kidney injury (AKI) in many of the 48 countries in the sub-Saharan region of Africa. The Sustainable Kidney Care Foundation, together with industry, universities, and funding organizations, has been working on establishing peritoneal dialysis treatment programs for AKI in East Africa, starting with the countries comprising the East African Community and with a special focus on treating children and women of childbearing age.
    Blood Purification 01/2012; 33(1-3):149-52. · 2.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Citrasate®, citric acid dialysate (CD), contains 2.4 mEq of citric acid (citrate), instead of acetic acid (acetate) as in standard bicarbonate dialysate. Previous studies suggest CD may improve dialysis adequacy and decrease heparin requirements, presumably due to nonsystemic anticoagulant effects in the dialyzer. We prospectively evaluated 277 hemodialysis patients in eight outpatient facilities to determine if CD with reduced heparin N (HN) would maintain dialyzer clearance. Subjects progressed through four study periods [baseline (B): bicarbonate dialysate + 100% HN; period 1 (P1): CD + 100% HN; period 2 (P2): CD + 80% HN; period 3 (P3): CD + 66.7% HN]. The predefined primary endpoint was noninferiority (margin -8%) of the percent change in mean dialyzer conductivity clearance between baseline and P2. Subjects were 57.4% male, 41.7% white, 54.3% black, and 44.4% diabetic; mean age was 59 ± 14.4 years; mean time on dialysis was 1,498 ± 1,165 days; 65.7% had arteriovenous fistula, 19.9% arteriovenous graft, 14.4% catheters, and 27.8% used antiplatelet agents. Mean dialyzer clearance increased 0.9% (P1), 1.0% (P2), and 0.9% (P3) with CD despite heparin reduction. SpKt/V remained stable (B: 1.54 ± 0.29; P1: 1.54 ± 0.28; P2: 1.55 ± 0.27; P3: 1.54 ± 0.26). There was no significant difference in dialyzer/dialysis line thrombosis, post-HD time to hemostasis, percent of subjects with adverse events (AEs), or study-related AEs. CD was safe, effective, and met all study endpoints. Dialyzer clearance increased approximately 1% with CD despite 20-33% heparin reduction. Over 92% of P3 subjects demonstrated noninferiority of dialyzer clearance with CD and 33% HN reduction. There was no significant difference in dialyzer clotting, bleeding, or adverse events.
    Blood Purification 01/2012; 33(1-3):199-204. · 2.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mortality varies seasonally in the general population, but it is unknown whether this phenomenon is also present in hemodialysis patients with known higher background mortality and emphasis on cardiovascular causes of death. This study aimed to assess seasonal variations in mortality, in relation to clinical and laboratory variables in a large cohort of chronic hemodialysis patients over a 5-year period. This study included 15,056 patients of 51 Renal Research Institute clinics from six states of varying climates in the United States. Seasonal differences were assessed by chi-squared tests and univariate and multivariate cosinor analyses. Mortality, both all-cause and cardiovascular, was significantly higher during winter compared with other seasons (14.2 deaths per 100 patient-years in winter, 13.1 in spring, 12.3 in autumn, and 11.9 in summer). The increase in mortality in winter was more pronounced in younger patients, as well as in whites and in men. Seasonal variations were similar across climatologically different regions. Seasonal variations were also observed in neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio and serum calcium, potassium, and platelet values. Differences in mortality disappeared when adjusted for seasonally variable clinical parameters. In a large cohort of dialysis patients, significant seasonal variations in overall and cardiovascular mortality were observed, which were consistent over different climatic regions. Other physiologic and laboratory parameters were also seasonally different. Results showed that mortality differences were related to seasonality of physiologic and laboratory parameters. Seasonal variations should be taken into account when designing and interpreting longitudinal studies in dialysis patients.
    Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 11/2011; 7(1):108-15. · 5.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Thermal changes during dialysis strongly influence intra-dialytic hemodynamics. The mechanisms behind the increase in body temperature during hemodialysis (HD) are still not completely understood. The objective of this retrospective observational cohort study is to assess the effect of circadian variation on body temperature changes during HD by comparing results in patients treated on different treatment shifts. Data from the Renal Research Institute, New York, clinical database encompassing patients treated in six states in the USA were used. Data from January and August 2008 were used for analysis. Body temperature changes during HD were categorized by dialysis shifts. Patients with morning shifts (n = 1064), afternoon shifts (n = 730) and evening shifts (n = 210) were compared. Pre-dialysis body temperatures were significantly different among the different shifts [morning, 36.41 (95% confidence interval: 36.39-36.43°C), afternoon, 36.47 (36.45-36.49°C), evening, 36.67 (36.64-36.70°C), P < 0.001]. In August, but not in January, intra-dialytic increases in body temperature were significantly different between patients treated during morning [0.07 (0.058-0.082°C)], afternoon [0.03 (0.016-0.044°C)] and evening shifts [-0.01 (-0.032 to 0.012°C); P < 0.001 analysis of variance], although in January, treatment shift was a significant predictor of the intra-dialytic increase in body temperature. The intra-dialytic change in body temperature was related not only to the pre-dialysis body temperature (r(2) = 0.31; P < 0.001) but also to microbiological dialysate quality, treatment time and dialysate temperature. The intra-dialytic change in blood pressure (BP) was significantly related to changes in intra-dialytic body temperature irrespective of the study month. Both pre-dialytic body temperature as well as changes in body temperature are significantly related to the timing of the dialysis shifts, in phase with the circadian body temperature rhythm. Due to the relationship between body temperature changes and changes in intra-dialytic BP, these findings might be of additional relevance in the pathogenesis of intra-dialytic hypotension.
    Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 07/2011; 27(3):1139-44. · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Prescription of an appropriate dialysis target weight (dry weight) requires accurate evaluation of the degree of hydration. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a state of normal hydration (DW(cBIS)) as defined by calf bioimpedance spectroscopy (cBIS) and conventional whole body bioimpedance spectroscopy (wBIS) could be characterized in hemodialysis (HD) patients and normal subjects (NS). wBIS and cBIS were performed in 62 NS (33 m/29 f) and 30 HD patients (16 m/14 f) pre- and post-dialysis treatments to measure extracellular resistance and fluid volume (ECV) by the whole body and calf bioimpedance methods. Normalized calf resistivity (ρ(N)(,5)) was defined as resistivity at 5 kHz divided by the body mass index. The ratio of wECV to total body water (wECV/TBW) was calculated. Measurements were made at baseline (BL) and at DW(cBIS) following the progressive reduction of post-HD weight over successive dialysis treatments until the curve of calf extracellular resistance is flattened (stabilization) and the ρ(N)(,5) was in the range of NS. Blood pressures were measured pre- and post-HD treatment. ρ(N)(,5) in males and females differed significantly in NS. In patients, ρ(N)(,5) notably increased with progressive decrease in body weight, and systolic blood pressure significantly decreased pre- and post-HD between BL and DW(cBIS) respectively. Although wECV/TBW decreased between BL and DW(cBIS), the percentage of change in wECV/TBW was significantly less than that in ρ(N)(,5) (-5.21 ± 3.2% versus 28 ± 27%, p < 0.001). This establishes the use of ρ(N)(,5) as a new comparator allowing a clinician to incrementally monitor removal of extracellular fluid from patients over the course of dialysis treatments. The conventional whole body technique using wECV/TBW was less sensitive than the use of ρ(N)(,5) to measure differences in body hydration between BL and DW(cBIS).
    Physiological Measurement 07/2011; 32(7):887-902. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A noninvasive test for determining elevated levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) may be useful under circumstances in which there is limited access to laboratories. Because saliva urea nitrogen (SUN) parallels BUN, we investigated the diagnostic performance of a semiquantitative SUN dipstick to test for elevated BUN levels in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Patients with CKD Stages 1 to 5D were studied. 50 µl of saliva were transferred onto the SUN test strip (Integrated Biomedical Technology, Elkhart, Indiana, IN, USA). SUN was determined after 1 minute by visual comparison of the color of the moistened test pad with 6 calibrated color blocks. Interobserver reproducibility was evaluated by independent observers, masked to urea concentrations of 6 calibrated urea solutions. Correlation between SUN and BUN was quantified by Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (RS), Kappa Statistic was employed to evaluate within-sample reproducibility of duplicates. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the diagnostic performance of SUN. 68 patients (31 females, 60 ± 14 years; 34 hemodialysis patients, 34 patients CKD Stages 1 - 4) were studied. Interobserver coefficient of variation was 4.9% at SUN levels > 50 mg/dl; within-sample reproducibility was 90%. SUN and BUN were correlated significantly (RS = 0.63; p < 0.01). Elevated BUN was diagnosed with high accuracy by SUN determination (area under the ROC curve: 0.90 (95% CI 0.85 - 0.95)). Semiquantitative dipstick measurements of SUN can reliably identify CKD patients with elevated BUN levels.
    Clinical nephrology 07/2011; 76(1):23-8. · 1.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) is being increasingly used as an alternative to continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). However, there has been concern regarding reduced sodium removal leading to hypertension and resulting in a faster decline in residual renal function (RRF). The objective of the present study was to compare patient and technique survival and other relevant parameters between patients treated with APD and patients treated with CAPD. Data for incident patients were retrieved from the database of the Renal Research Institute, New York. Treatment modality was defined 90 days after the start of dialysis treatment. In addition to technique and patient survival, RRF, blood pressure, and laboratory parameters were also compared. 179 CAPD and 441 APD patients were studied. Mean as-treated survival was 1407 days [95% confidence interval (CI) 1211 - 1601] in CAPD patients and 1616 days (95% CI 1478 - 1764) in APD patients. Adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for mortality was 1.31 in CAPD compared to APD (95% CI 0.76 - 2.25, p = NS). Unadjusted as-treated technique survival was lower in CAPD compared to APD, with HR 2.84 (95% CI 1.65 - 4.88, p = 0.002); adjusted HR was 1.81 (95% CI 0.94 - 3.57, p = 0.08). Peritonitis rate was 0.3 episodes/patient-year for CAPD and APD; exit-site/tunnel infection rate was 0.1 and 0.3 episodes/patient-year for CAPD and APD respectively (p = NS). Patient survival was not significantly different between APD and CAPD patients, whereas technique survival appeared to be higher in APD patients and could not be explained by differences in infectious complications. No difference in blood pressure control or decline in RRF was observed between the 2 modalities. Based on these results, APD appears to be an acceptable alternative to CAPD, although technique prescription should always follow individual judgment.
    Peritoneal dialysis international : journal of the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis. 01/2011; 31(6):679-84.
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    ABSTRACT: Prescription of an appropriate post hemodialysis (HD) dialysis target weight requires accurate evaluation of the degree of hydration. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a state of normal hydration as defined by calf bioimpedance spectroscopy (cBIS) could be characterized in HD and normal subjects (NS). cBIS was performed in 62 NS (33 m/29 f) and 30 HD patients (16 m /14 f) pre-and post-dialysis to measure extracellular resistance. Normalized calf resistivity at 5 kHz (ρ N,5) was defined as resistivity divided by body mass index. Measurements were made at baseline (BL) and at a state of normal hydration (NH) established following the progressive reduction of post-HD weight over successive dialysis treatments until the ρ N,5 was in the range of NS. Blood pressures were measured pre-and post-HD treatment. ρ N,5 in males and females differed significantly in NS (20.5±1.99 vs 21.7±2.6 10 -2 Ωm 3 /kg, p<0.05). In patients, ρ N,5 notably increased and reached NH range due to progressive decrease in body weight, and systolic blood pressure (SBP) significantly decreased pre-and post-HD between BL and NBH respectively. This establishes the use of ρ N,5 as a new comparator allowing the clinician to incrementally monitor the effect of removal of extracellular fluid from patients over a course of dialysis treatments.
    Journal of Physics Conference Series 01/2010; 224(1).
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    ABSTRACT: This study used multi-frequency bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) of the arm and whole body to estimate muscle mass (MM) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) in 31 hemodialysis (HD) patients comparing these results with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and body potassium ((40)K) as gold standards. Total body and arm MM (MM(MRI)) and SAT (SAT(MRI)) were measured by MRI. All measurements were made before dialysis treatment. Regression models with the arm (aBIS) and whole body (wBIS) resistances were established. Correlations between gold standards and the BIS model were high for the arm SAT (r(2) = 0.93, standard error of estimate (SEE) = 3.6 kg), and whole body SAT (r(2) = 0.92, SEE = 3.5 kg), and for arm MM (r(2) = 0.84, SEE = 2.28 kg) and whole body MM (r(2) = 0.86, SEE = 2.28 kg). Total body MM and SAT can be accurately predicted by arm BIS models with advantages of convenience and portability, and it should be useful to assess nutritional status in HD patients.
    Blood Purification 04/2009; 27(4):330-7. · 2.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Accurate estimation of body muscle, fat and fluid volumes in dialysis patients is an important factor to predict outcomes of the disease. Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) has been used to measure extracellular (Re) and intracellular resistance (Ri) with whole body (wBIS) and segmental (sBIS) measurement. 40 stable HD patients (22 m / 18 f, age 54.7 plusmn11 yrs, height (H) 1.67 plusmn 0.94 m, weight (Wt) 77.7 plusmn 17 kg) were studied with wBIS and sBIS compared to the gold standard measurements by MRI and tracer dilution assays (D2O and NaBr) pre dialysis. Multiple linear regression models were constructed with body compartment estimates from the gold standard methods as the dependent variables and bioimpedance-derived resistances, Wt, H, and age as independent variables. The results of estimation for fat (r2 = 0.96 and r2 = 0.91), for muscle (r2 = 0.9 and r2 = 0.88) and for ECV (r2 = 0.73 and r2 = 0.59) were from sBIS and wBIS model respectively. In conclusion, the sBIS model is useful to assess body composition in dialysis patients.
    01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: Cool dialysate may ameliorate intradialytic hypotension (IDH). It is not known whether it is sufficient to prevent an increase in core temperature (CT) during hemodialysis (HD) or whether a mild decline in CT would yield superior results. The aim of this study was to compare both approaches with regard to IDH. Fourteen HD patients with a history of IDH were studied. During three mid-week HD treatments, CT was set to decrease by 0.5 degrees C ("cooling") or to remain unchanged at the baseline level ("isothermic"). "Thermoneutral" HD (no energy is added to or removed from the patient) was used as a control. Central blood volume (CBV), BP, skin temperature, heart rate variability [low and high frequency] were recorded. CT increased during thermoneutral and remained respectively stable and decreased during isothermic and cooling. Skin temperature decreased significantly during isothermic and cooling, but not during thermoneutral. Nadir systolic BP (SBP) levels were lower during isothermic and thermoneutral compared with cooling. CBV tended to be higher during cooling compared with isothermic and thermoneutral. Three patients complained of shivering during cooling. Change in LF/HF was not different between cooling, isothermic, and thermoneutral. IDH may be slightly improved by cooling compared with the isothermic approach, possibly because of improved maintenance of CBV. The hemodynamic effects of mild blood cooling should be balanced against a potentially higher risk of cold discomfort.
    Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 10/2008; 4(1):93-8. · 5.07 Impact Factor
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    Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 09/2006; 21(8):2057-60. · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study demonstrates a technique to measure electrical resistivity of the calf in hemodialysis (HD) patients during HD treatment. To continuously monitor and calculate resistivity, a model of calf volume based on its geometrical size and measurement of its electrical resistance has been developed. The model makes it possible to continuously estimate reduction of the calf circumference during HD. Seventeen HD patients were studied during HD using a multi-frequency bioimpedance device (Xitron 4200). Circumference of the calf was measured by a measuring tape pre- and post- HD for each treatment. Results showed a high correlation between measurement and calculation circumference in post HD (r(2)=0.985). Further, the value of resistivity normalized by body mass index (BMI) provides information about patients' hydration state in comparison to those in healthy subjects. This technique is useful for identifying the range of optimal hydration states for HD patients.
    Conference proceedings: ... Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Conference 02/2006; 1:5126-8.
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    ABSTRACT: The cause of the increase in core temperature (CT) during hemodialysis (HD) is still under debate. It has been suggested that peripheral vasoconstriction as a result of hypovolemia, leading to a reduced dissipation of heat from the skin, is the main cause of this increase in CT. If so, then it would be expected that extracorporeal heat flow (Jex) needed to maintain a stable CT (isothermic; T-control = 0, no change in CT) is largely different between body temperature control HD combined with ultrafiltration (UF) and body temperature control HD without UF (isovolemic). Consequently, significant differences in DeltaCT would be expected between isovolemic HD and HD combined with UF at zero Jex (thermoneutral; E-control = 0, no supply or removal of thermal energy to and from the extracorporeal circulation). During the latter treatment, the CT is expected to increase. In this study, changes in thermal variables (CT and Jex), skin blood flow, energy expenditure, and cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1 receptor antagonist, and IL-6) were compared in 13 patients, each undergoing body temperature control (T-control = 0) HD without and with UF and energy-neutral (E-control = 0) HD without and with UF. CT increased equally during energy-neutral treatments, with (0.32 +/- 0.16 degrees C; P = 0.000) and without (0.27 +/- 0.29 degrees C; P = 0.006) UF. In body temperature control treatments, the relationship between Jex and UF tended to be significant (r = -0.51; P = 0.07); however, there was no significant difference in cooling requirements regardless of whether treatments were done without (-17.9 +/- 9.3W) or with UF (-17.8 +/- 13.27W). Changes in energy expenditure did not differ among the four treatment modes. There were no significant differences in pre- and postdialysis levels of cytokines within or between treatments. Although fluid removal has an effect on thermal variables, no single mechanism seems to be responsible for the increased heat accumulation during HD.
    Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 07/2005; 16(6):1824-31. · 8.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to investigate whether body mass index (BMI) influences the estimation of extracellular volume (ECV) in hemodialysis (HD) patients when using segmental bioimpedance analysis (SBIA) compared to wrist-to-ankle bioimpedance analysis (WBIA) during HD with ultrafiltration (UF). Twenty five HD patients (M:F 19:6,) were studied, and further subdivided into two groups of patients, one group with a high BMI (25 kg m-2) and the other with a low BMI (<25 kg m-2). Segmental (arm, trunk, leg) and wrist-to-ankle bioimpedance measurements on each patient were performed using a modified Xitron 4000B system (Xitron Technologies, San Diego, CA). No differences in extracellular resistance (R(E), ohms) between wrist-to-ankle (R(W)) and sum of segments (R(S)) were noted for either the high BMI (489.2+/-82 ohm versus 491.6+/-82 ohm, p=ns) or low BMI groups (560.8+/-77 ohm versus 557.5+/-75 ohm, p=ns). UF volume (UFV, liters) did not differ significantly between the groups (4.0+/-0.9 L versus 3.3+/-1.0 L, p=ns), but change in ECV (DeltaECV) differed not only between methods: WBIA versus SBIA in the high BMI group (2.74+/-1.1 L versus 3.64+/-1.4 L, p<0.001) and in the low BMI group (1.86+/-0.9 L versus 2.91+/-1.0 L, p<0.05) but also between the high and lower BMI groups with WBIA (2.74+/-1.1 L versus 1.86+/-0.9 L, p<0.01). However, there was no significant difference in SBIA between BMI groups. This study suggests that the segmental bioimpedance approach may more accurately reflect changes in ECV during HD with UF than whole body impedance measurements.
    Physiological Measurement 04/2005; 26(2):S93-9. · 1.50 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

127 Citations
63.08 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006–2012
    • Renal Research Institute
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2005–2011
    • Beth Israel Medical Center
      New York City, New York, United States
    • Maastricht University
      • Interne Geneeskunde
      Maastricht, Provincie Limburg, Netherlands