Irene L Andrulis

Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, New York, United States

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Publications (259)2093.25 Total impact

  • Mathieu Blais · Shelley B. Bull · Dushanthi Pinnaduwage · Irene L. Andrulis ·

    Cancer Research 11/2015; 75(22 Supplement 1):A2-61-A2-61. DOI:10.1158/1538-7445.TRANSCAGEN-A2-61 · 9.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We previously observed T-bet(+) lymphocytes to be associated with a good prognosis in a cohort of women with familial breast cancer. To validate this finding, we evaluated lymphocyte T-bet expression in an independent unselected prospectively accrued series of women with lymph node-negative breast carcinoma. T-bet and clinicopathologic data were available for 614 women. Hormone receptors, HER2, Ki-67, CK5, EGFR, p53, and T-bet status were determined using IHC and/or biochemical methods. Tumors were assigned to luminal A, luminal B, HER2, and basal subtypes based on the expression of IHC markers. Multiple cutpoints were examined in a univariate penalized Cox model to stratify tumors into T-bet(+/high) and T-bet(-/low). Fisher exact test was used to analyze T-bet associations with clinicopathologic variables, IHC markers, and molecular subtype. Survival analyses were by the Cox proportional hazards model. All tests were two sided. A test with a P value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. T-bet(+/high) tumor status was significantly associated with large tumor size, high grade, hormone receptor negativity, CK5, EGFR and p53 positivity, high Ki-67, and basal subtype. With a median follow-up of 96.5 months, T-bet(-/low) tumor status was associated with a reduced disease-free survival compared with T-bet(+/high) tumor status in multivariate analysis (P = 0.0027; relative risk = 5.62; 95% confidence intervals, 1.48-50.19). Despite being associated with adverse clinicopathologic characteristics, T-bet(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphoid cells are associated with a favorable outcome. This supports their role in Th1-mediated antitumor activity and may provide insight for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Cancer Immunol Res; 1-8. ©2015 AACR.
    11/2015; DOI:10.1158/2326-6066.CIR-15-0051
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    ABSTRACT: Background Women with a family history of breast cancer face considerable uncertainty about whether to pursue standard screening, intensive screening, or prophylactic surgery. Accurate and individualized risk-estimation approaches may help these women make more informed decisions. Although highly penetrant genetic variants have been associated with familial breast cancer (FBC) risk, many individuals do not carry these variants, and many carriers never develop breast cancer. Common risk variants have a relatively modest effect on risk and show limited potential for predicting FBC development. As an alternative, we hypothesized that additional genomic data types, such as gene-expression levels, which can reflect genetic and epigenetic variation, could contribute to classifying a person’s risk status. Specifically, we aimed to identify common patterns in gene-expression levels across individuals who develop FBC. Methods We profiled peripheral blood mononuclear cells from women with a family history of breast cancer (with or without a germline BRCA1/2 variant) and from controls. We used the support vector machines algorithm to differentiate between patients who developed FBC and those who did not. Our study used two independent datasets, a training set of 124 women from Utah (USA) and an external validation (test) set from Ontario (Canada) of 73 women (197 total). We controlled for expression variation associated with clinical, demographic, and treatment variables as well as lymphocyte markers. Results Our multigene biomarker provided accurate, individual-level estimates of FBC occurrence for the Utah cohort (AUC = 0.76 [0.67-84]) . Even at their lower confidence bounds, these accuracy estimates meet or exceed estimates from alternative approaches. Our Ontario cohort resulted in similarly high levels of accuracy (AUC = 0.73 [0.59-0.86]), thus providing external validation of our findings. Individuals deemed to have “high” risk by our model would have an estimated 2.4 times greater odds of developing familial breast cancer than individuals deemed to have “low” risk. Conclusions Together, these findings suggest that gene-expression levels in peripheral blood cells reflect genomic variation associated with breast cancer risk and that such data have potential to be used as a non-invasive biomarker for familial breast cancer risk. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12920-015-0145-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
    BMC Medical Genomics 11/2015; 8(1). DOI:10.1186/s12920-015-0145-6 · 2.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Understanding how young girls respond to growing up with breast cancer family histories is critical given expansion of genetic testing and breast cancer messaging. We examined the impact of breast cancer family history on psychosocial adjustment and health behaviors among >800 girls in the multicenter LEGACY Girls Study. Methods: Girls aged 6 to 13 years with a family history of breast cancer or familial BRCA1/2 mutation (BCFH+), peers without a family history (BCFH-), and their biological mothers completed assessments of psychosocial adjustment (maternal report for 6- to 13-year-olds, self-report for 10- to 13-year-olds), breast cancer-specific distress, perceived risk of breast cancer, and health behaviors (10- to 13-year-olds). Results: BCFH+ girls had better general psychosocial adjustment than BCFH- peers by maternal report. Psychosocial adjustment and health behaviors did not differ significantly by self-report among 10- to 13-year-old girls. BCFH+ girls reported higher breast cancer-specific distress (P = .001) and were more likely to report themselves at increased breast cancer risk than BCFH- peers (38.4% vs 13.7%, P < .001), although many girls were unsure of their risk. In multivariable analyses, higher daughter anxiety was associated with higher maternal anxiety and poorer family communication. Higher daughter breast cancer-specific distress was associated with higher maternal breast cancer-specific distress. Conclusions: Although growing up in a family at risk for breast cancer does not negatively affect general psychosocial adjustment among preadolescent girls, those from breast cancer risk families experience greater breast cancer-specific distress. Interventions to address daughter and mother breast cancer concerns and responses to genetic or familial risk might improve psychosocial outcomes of teen daughters.
    PEDIATRICS 10/2015; 136(5). DOI:10.1542/peds.2015-0498 · 5.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Studies of related individuals have consistently demonstrated notable familial aggregation of cancer. We aim to estimate the heritability and genetic correlation attributable to the additive effects of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for cancer at 13 anatomical sites. METHODS: Between 2007 and 2014, the US National Cancer Institute has generated data from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for 49 492 cancer case patients and 34 131 control patients. We apply novel mixed model methodology (GCTA) to this GWAS data to estimate the heritability of individual cancers, as well as the proportion of heritability attributable to cigarette smoking in smoking-related cancers, and the genetic correlation between pairs of cancers. RESULTS: GWAS heritability was statistically significant at nearly all sites, with the estimates of array-based heritability, hl (2), on the liability threshold (LT) scale ranging from 0.05 to 0.38. Estimating the combined heritability of multiple smoking characteristics, we calculate that at least 24% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 14% to 37%) and 7% (95% CI = 4% to 11%) of the heritability for lung and bladder cancer, respectively, can be attributed to genetic determinants of smoking. Most pairs of cancers studied did not show evidence of strong genetic correlation. We found only four pairs of cancers with marginally statistically significant correlations, specifically kidney and testes (rho = 0.73, SE = 0.28), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and pediatric osteosarcoma (rho = 0.53, SE = 0.21), DLBCL and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) (rho = 0.51, SE =0.18), and bladder and lung (rho = 0.35, SE = 0.14). Correlation analysis also indicates that the genetic architecture of lung cancer differs between a smoking population of European ancestry and a nonsmoking Asian population, allowing for the possibility that the genetic etiology for the same disease can vary by population and environmental exposures. CONCLUSION: Our results provide important insights into the genetic architecture of cancers and suggest new avenues for investigation.
    JNCI Journal of the National Cancer Institute 10/2015; 107(12). DOI:10.1093/jnci/djv279 · 12.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Menopause timing has a substantial impact on infertility and risk of disease, including breast cancer, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We report a dual strategy in ∼70,000 women to identify common and low-frequency protein-coding variation associated with age at natural menopause (ANM). We identified 44 regions with common variants, including two regions harboring additional rare missense alleles of large effect. We found enrichment of signals in or near genes involved in delayed puberty, highlighting the first molecular links between the onset and end of reproductive lifespan. Pathway analyses identified major association with DNA damage response (DDR) genes, including the first common coding variant in BRCA1 associated with any complex trait. Mendelian randomization analyses supported a causal effect of later ANM on breast cancer risk (∼6% increase in risk per year; P = 3 × 10(-14)), likely mediated by prolonged sex hormone exposure rather than DDR mechanisms.
    Nature Genetics 09/2015; DOI:10.1038/ng.3412 · 29.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We carried out whole genome and transcriptome sequencing on four tumor/normal pairs of epithelioid sarcoma. These index cases were supplemented with whole transcriptome sequencing of three additional tumors and three cell lines. Unlike rhabdoid tumor (the other major group of SMARCB1-negative cancers), epithelioid sarcoma shows a complex genome with a higher mutational rate, comparable to that of ovarian carcinoma. Despite this mutational burden, SMARCB1 mutations remain the most frequently recurring event and are probably critical drivers of tumor formation. Several cases show heterozygous SMARCB1 mutations without inactivation of the second allele, and we explore this further in vitro. Finding CDKN2A deletions in our discovery cohort, we evaluated CDKN2A protein expression in a tissue microarray. Six out of sixteen cases had lost CDKN2A in greater than or equal to 90% of cells, while the remaining cases had retained the protein. Expression analysis of epithelioid sarcoma cell lines by transcriptome sequencing shows a unique profile that does not cluster with any particular tissue type nor with other SWI/SNF-aberrant lines. Evaluation of the levels of members of the SWI/SNF complex other than SMARCB1 revealed that these proteins are expressed as part of a residual complex, similarly to previously studied rhabdoid tumor lines. This residual SWI/SNF is susceptible to synthetic lethality and may therefore indicate a therapeutic opportunity.
    The Journal of Pathology 09/2015; DOI:10.1002/path.4636 · 7.43 Impact Factor

  • Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention 09/2015; DOI:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-15-0363 · 4.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In breast cancer, constitutive activation of NF-κB has been reported, however, the impact of genetic variation of the pathway on patient prognosis has been little studied. Furthermore, a combination of genetic variants, rather than single polymorphisms, may affect disease prognosis. Here, in an extensive dataset (n = 30,431) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, we investigated the association of 917 SNPs in 75 genes in the NF-κB pathway with breast cancer prognosis. We explored SNP-SNP interactions on survival using the likelihood-ratio test comparing multivariate Cox' regression models of SNP pairs without and with an interaction term. We found two interacting pairs associating with prognosis: patients simultaneously homozygous for the rare alleles of rs5996080 and rs7973914 had worse survival (HRinteraction 6.98, 95% CI=3.3-14.4, P=1.42E-07), and patients carrying at least one rare allele for rs17243893 and rs57890595 had better survival (HRinteraction 0.51, 95% CI=0.3-0.6, P = 2.19E-05). Based on in silico functional analyses and literature, we speculate that the rs5996080 and rs7973914 loci may affect the BAFFR and TNFR1/TNFR3 receptors and breast cancer survival, possibly by disturbing both the canonical and non-canonical NF-κB pathways or their dynamics, whereas, rs17243893-rs57890595 interaction on survival may be mediated through TRAF2-TRAIL-R4 interplay. These results warrant further validation and functional analyses.
    Oncotarget 08/2015; DOI:10.18632/oncotarget.4991 · 6.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Epidemiological studies have linked adult height with breast cancer risk in women. However, the magnitude of the association, particularly by subtypes of breast cancer, has not been established. Furthermore, the mechanisms of the association remain unclear. Methods: We performed a meta-analysis to investigate associations between height and breast cancer risk using data from 159 prospective cohorts totaling 5216302 women, including 113178 events. In a consortium with individual-level data from 46325 case patients and 42482 control patients, we conducted a Mendelian randomization analysis using a genetic score that comprised 168 height-associated variants as an instrument. This association was further evaluated in a second consortium using summary statistics data from 16003 case patients and 41335 control patients. Results: The pooled relative risk of breast cancer was 1.17 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.15 to 1.19) per 10cm increase in height in the meta-analysis of prospective studies. In Mendelian randomization analysis, the odds ratio of breast cancer per 10cm increase in genetically predicted height was 1.22 (95% CI = 1.13 to 1.32) in the first consortium and 1.21 (95% CI = 1.05 to 1.39) in the second consortium. The association was found in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women but restricted to hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Analyses of height-associated variants identified eight new loci associated with breast cancer risk after adjusting for multiple comparisons, including three loci at 1q21.2, DNAJC27, and CCDC91 at genome-wide significance level P < 5×10(-8). Conclusions: Our study provides strong evidence that adult height is a risk factor for breast cancer in women and certain genetic factors and biological pathways affecting adult height have an important role in the etiology of breast cancer.
    Journal of the National Cancer Institute 08/2015; 107(11). DOI:10.1093/jnci/djv219 · 12.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Mammographic density is an established breast cancer risk factor with a strong genetic component and can be increased in women using menopausal hormone therapy (MHT). Here, we aimed to identify genetic variants that may modify the association between MHT use and mammographic density. Methods: The study comprised 6,298 postmenopausal women from the Mayo Mammography Health Study and nine studies included in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We selected for evaluation 1327 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) showing the lowest P-values for interaction (P int) in a meta-analysis of genome-wide gene-environment interaction studies with MHT use on risk of breast cancer, 2541 SNPs in candidate genes (AKR1C4, CYP1A1-CYP1A2, CYP1B1, ESR2, PPARG, PRL, SULT1A1-SULT1A2 and TNF) and ten SNPs (AREG-rs10034692, PRDM6-rs186749, ESR1-rs12665607, ZNF365-rs10995190, 8p11.23-rs7816345, LSP1-rs3817198, IGF1-rs703556, 12q24-rs1265507, TMEM184B-rs7289126, and SGSM3-rs17001868) associated with mammographic density in genome-wide studies. We used multiple linear regression models adjusted for potential confounders to evaluate interactions between SNPs and current use of MHT on mammographic density. Results: No significant interactions were identified after adjustment for multiple testing. The strongest SNP-MHT interaction (unadjusted P int <0.0004) was observed with rs9358531 6.5kb 5' of PRL. Furthermore, three SNPs in PLCG2 that had previously been shown to modify the association of MHT use with breast cancer risk were found to modify also the association of MHT use with mammographic density (unadjusted P int <0.002), but solely among cases (unadjusted P int SNP×MHT×case-status <0.02). Conclusions: The study identified potential interactions on mammographic density between current use of MHT and SNPs near PRL and in PLCG2, which require confirmation. Given the moderate size of the interactions observed, larger studies are needed to identify genetic modifiers of the association of MHT use with mammographic density.
    Breast cancer research: BCR 08/2015; 17(1):110. DOI:10.1186/s13058-015-0625-9 · 5.49 Impact Factor

  • Cancer Research 08/2015; 75(15 Supplement):2782-2782. DOI:10.1158/1538-7445.AM2015-2782 · 9.33 Impact Factor

  • Cancer Research 08/2015; 75(15 Supplement):5574-5574. DOI:10.1158/1538-7445.AM2015-5574 · 9.33 Impact Factor
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    International Journal of Epidemiology 07/2015; DOI:10.1093/ije/dyv118 · 9.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Epidemiological studies have reported inconsistent associations between telomere length (TL) and risk for various cancers. These inconsistencies are likely attributable, in part, to biases that arise due to post-diagnostic and post-treatment TL measurement. To avoid such biases, we used a Mendelian randomization approach and estimated associations between nine TL-associated SNPs and risk for five common cancer types (breast, lung, colorectal, ovarian and prostate cancer, including subtypes) using data on 51,725 cases and 62,035 controls. We then used an inverse-variance weighted average of the SNP-specific associations to estimate the association between a genetic score representing long TL and cancer risk. The long TL genetic score was significantly associated with increased risk of lung adenocarcinoma (P=6.3x10(-15)), even after exclusion of a SNP residing in a known lung cancer susceptibility region (TERT-CLPTM1L) P=6.6x10(-6)). Under Mendelian randomization assumptions, the association estimate (odds ratio (OR)=2.78) is interpreted as the OR for lung adenocarcinoma corresponding to a 1000 base pair increase in TL. The weighted TL SNP score was not associated with other cancer types or subtypes. Our finding that genetic determinants of long TL increase lung adenocarcinoma risk avoids issues with reverse causality and residual confounding that arise in observational studies of TL and disease risk. Under Mendelian randomization assumptions, our finding suggests that longer TL increases lung adenocarcinoma risk. However, caution regarding this causal interpretation is warranted in light of the potential issue of pleiotropy, and a more general interpretation is that SNPs influencing telomere biology are also implicated in lung adenocarcinoma risk. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email:
    Human Molecular Genetics 07/2015; 24(18). DOI:10.1093/hmg/ddv252 · 6.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The etiologic contribution of germline genetic variation to sporadic osteosarcoma is not well understood. Osteosarcoma is a sentinel cancer of Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), in which approximately 70% of families meeting the classic criteria have germline TP53 mutations. We sequenced TP53 exons in 765 osteosarcoma cases. Data were analyzed with χ(2) tests, logistic regression, and Cox proportional hazards regression models. We observed a high frequency of young osteosarcoma cases (age <30 years) carrying a known LFS- or likely LFS-associated mutation (3.8%) or rare exonic variant (5.7%) with an overall frequency of 9.5%, compared with none in case patients age 30 years and older (P < .001). This high TP53 mutation prevalence in young osteosarcoma cases is statistically significantly greater than the previously reported prevalence of 3% (P = .0024). We identified a novel association between a TP53 rare variant and metastasis at diagnosis of osteosarcoma (rs1800372, odds ratio = 4.27, 95% confidence interval = 1.2 to 15.5, P = .026). Genetic susceptibility to young onset osteosarcoma is distinct from older adult onset osteosarcoma, with a high frequency of LFS-associated and rare exonic TP53 variants. Published by Oxford University Press 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.
    Journal of the National Cancer Institute 07/2015; 107(7). DOI:10.1093/jnci/djv101 · 12.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mena(calc) is an immunofluorescence-based, quantitative method in which expression of the non-invasive Mena protein isoform (Mena11a) is subtracted from total Mena protein expression. Previous work has found a significant positive association between Mena(calc) and risk of death from breast cancer. Our goal was to determine if Mena(calc) could be used as an independent prognostic marker for axillary node-negative (ANN) breast cancer. Analysis of the association of Mena(calc) with overall survival (death from any cause) was performed for 403 ANN tumors using Kaplan Meier survival curves and the univariate Cox proportional hazards (PH) model with the log-rank or the likelihood ratio test. Cox PH models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for the association of Mena(calc) with risk of death after adjustment for HER2 status and clinicopathological tumor features. High Mena(calc) was associated with increased risk of death from any cause (P = 0.0199, HR (CI) = 2.18 (1.19, 4.00)). A similarly elevated risk of death was found in the subset of the Mena(calc) cohort which did not receive hormone or chemotherapy (n = 142) (P = 0.0052, HR (CI) = 3.80 (1.58, 9.97)). There was a trend toward increased risk of death with relatively high Mena(calc) in the HER2, basal and luminal molecular subtypes. Mena(calc) may serve as an independent prognostic biomarker for the ANN breast cancer patient population.
    BMC Cancer 06/2015; 15(1):483. DOI:10.1186/s12885-015-1468-6 · 3.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Metastasis is the leading cause of death in osteosarcoma patients, the most common pediatric bone malignancy. We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study of osteosarcoma metastasis at diagnosis in 935 osteosarcoma patients to determine whether germline genetic variation contributes to risk of metastasis. We identified a SNP, rs7034162, in NFIB significantly associated with metastasis in European osteosarcoma cases, as well as in cases of African and Brazilian ancestry (meta-analysis of all cases: P=1.2x10(-9), OR 2.43, 95% CI 1.83-3.24). The risk allele was significantly associated with lowered NFIB expression, which led to increased osteosarcoma cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, a transposon screen in mice identified a significant proportion of osteosarcomas harboring inactivating insertions in Nfib, and had lowered Nfib expression. These data suggest that germline genetic variation at rs7034162 is important in osteosarcoma metastasis, and that NFIB is an osteosarcoma metastasis susceptibility gene. Copyright © 2015, American Association for Cancer Research.
    Cancer Discovery 06/2015; 5(9). DOI:10.1158/2159-8290.CD-15-0125 · 19.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies have identified SNPs near ZNF365 at 10q21.2 that are associated with both breast cancer risk and mammographic density. To identify the most likely causal SNPs, we fine mapped the association signal by genotyping 428 SNPs across the region in 89,050 European and 12,893 Asian case and control subjects from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We identified four independent sets of correlated, highly trait-associated variants (iCHAVs), three of which were located within ZNF365. The most strongly risk-associated SNP, rs10995201 in iCHAV1, showed clear evidence of association with both estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (OR = 0.85 [0.82-0.88]) and ER-negative (OR = 0.87 [0.82-0.91]) disease, and was also the SNP most strongly associated with percent mammographic density. iCHAV2 (lead SNP, chr10: 64,258,684:D) and iCHAV3 (lead SNP, rs7922449) were also associated with ER-positive (OR = 0.93 [0.91-0.95] and OR = 1.06 [1.03-1.09]) and ER-negative (OR = 0.95 [0.91-0.98] and OR = 1.08 [1.04-1.13]) disease. There was weaker evidence for iCHAV4, located 5' of ADO, associated only with ER-positive breast cancer (OR = 0.93 [0.90-0.96]). We found 12, 17, 18, and 2 candidate causal SNPs for breast cancer in iCHAVs 1-4, respectively. Chromosome conformation capture analysis showed that iCHAV2 interacts with the ZNF365 and NRBF2 (more than 600 kb away) promoters in normal and cancerous breast epithelial cells. Luciferase assays did not identify SNPs that affect transactivation of ZNF365, but identified a protective haplotype in iCHAV2, associated with silencing of the NRBF2 promoter, implicating this gene in the etiology of breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 06/2015; 97(1). DOI:10.1016/j.ajhg.2015.05.002 · 10.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BReast CAncer genes 1 and 2 (BRCA1 and BRCA2) mutation carriers diagnosed with breast cancer are at increased risk of developing a second primary breast cancer. Data from high-risk clinics may be subject to different biases which can cause both over and underestimation of this risk. Using data from a large multi-institutional family registry we estimated the 10-year cumulative risk of second primary breast cancer including more complete testing information on family members. We prospectively followed 800 women diagnosed with breast cancer from the Breast Cancer Family Registry (BCFR) who were carriers of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 pathogenic mutation or a variant of unknown clinical significance. In order to limit survival and ascertainment bias, cases were limited to those diagnosed with a first primary breast cancer from 1994 to 2001 and enrolled in the BCFR within 3 years after their cancer diagnosis. We excluded women enrolled after being diagnosed with a second breast cancer. We calculated 10-year incidence of second primary breast cancers. The 10-year incidence of a second primary breast cancer was highest in BRCA1 mutation carriers (17 %; 95 % CI 11-25 %), with even higher estimates in those first diagnosed under the age of 40 (21 %; 95 % CI 13-34 %). Lower rates were found in BRCA2 mutation carriers (7 %; 95 % CI 3-15 %) and women with a variant of unknown clinical significance (6 %; 95 % CI 4-9 %). Whereas the cumulative 10-year incidence of second primary breast cancer is high in BRCA1 mutation carriers, the estimates in BRCA2 mutation carriers and women with variants of unknown clinical significance are similar to those reported in women with sporadic breast cancer.
    Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 05/2015; 151(3). DOI:10.1007/s10549-015-3419-y · 3.94 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

8k Citations
2,093.25 Total Impact Points


  • 2014-2015
    • Mount Sinai Hospital
      New York, New York, United States
    • The Ohio State University
      Columbus, Ohio, United States
  • 1989-2015
    • Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto
      • Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 1984-2015
    • University of Toronto
      • • Department of Molecular Genetics
      • • Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology
      • • Department of Surgery
      • • Mount Sinai Hospital
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2011-2014
    • Sinai Hospital
      Mount Sinai, New York, United States
  • 1993-2014
    • Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2013
    • German Cancer Research Center
      • Division of Cancer Epidemiology
      Heidelberg, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany
    • Herlev Hospital
      • Department of Pathology
      Herlev, Capital Region, Denmark
  • 2005-2012
    • Cancer Care Ontario
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2009-2010
    • University of Cambridge
      • • Department of Public Health and Primary Care
      • • Department of Oncology
      Cambridge, ENG, United Kingdom
    • Beijing University of Technology
      Peping, Beijing, China
  • 2007
    • University of Cologne
      Köln, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 2006
    • Columbia University
      New York, New York, United States
  • 1986
    • SickKids
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada