Yi-Chen Chen

National Taiwan University, T’ai-pei, Taipei, Taiwan

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Publications (59)116.21 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Black vinegar (BV) contains abundant essential and hydrophobic amino acids, and polyphenolic contents, especially catechin and chlorogenic acid via chemical analyses. K and Mg are the major minerals in BV, and Ca, Fe, Mn, and Se are also measured. After a 9-week experiment, high-fat/cholesterol-diet (HFCD) fed hamsters had higher (p < 0.05) weight gains, relative visceral-fat sizes, serum/liver lipids, and serum cardiac indices than low-fat/cholesterol diet (LFCD) fed ones, but BV supplementation decreased (p < 0.05) them which may resulted from the higher (p < 0.05) faecal TAG and TC contents. Serum ALT value, and hepatic thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and hepatic TNF-α and IL-1β contents in HFCD-fed hamsters were reduced (p < 0.05) by supplementing BV due to increased (p < 0.05) hepatic glutathione (GSH) and trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) levels, and catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. Taken together, the component profiles of BV contributed the lipid lowering and antioxidant effects on HFCD fed hamsters.
    Food Chemistry. 01/2015; 168:63–69.
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    ABSTRACT: Previous reports have suggested that many constituents within various algal samples are able to attenuate LPS-induced inflammatory effects. To date no report has been published on the regulation of virus-induced inflammatory response of Dunaliella salina carotenoid extract. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory effect of D. salina carotenoid extract on pseudorabies virus (PRV)-infected RAW 264.7 macrophages was investigated. We evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of D. salina carotenoid extract on PRV-infected RAW 264.7 cells by measuring cell viability, cytotoxicity, production of inflammatory mediators such as NO, iNOS, COX-2, pro-inflammatory cytokines and anti-virus replication by plaque assay. We found down-regulation of the expression of the iNOS, COX-2 and pro-inflammatory genes IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and MCP-1 in a dose-dependent manner. Although there was no effect on viral replication, there were tendencies toward lower virus titer and tendencies toward higher cell survival. Most importantly, we found that inhibition of TLR9, PI3K and Akt phosphorylation plays a crucial role in the extract-mediated NF-κB regulation by modulating IKK-IκB signaling in PRV-infected RAW264.7 cells. These results indicate that D. salina carotenoid extracts inhibited inflammation by inhibition of NF-κB activation by TLR9 dependent via PI3K/Akt inactivation.
    Food and Chemical Toxicology. 06/2014; 71.
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    ABSTRACT: Litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) flower ethanolic extract (LFEE) contained five flavanoids (total amount,102.73 ± 5.50 mg/g of dried extract (gDE)), nine phenolic acids (total amount, 60.31 ± 4.52 mg/ gDE) and proanthocyanidin A2 (79.31 ± 2.95 mg/ gDE). LFEE was used to evaluate the inhibitory effect on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pro-inflammatory mediators in RAW264.7 cells. Results show that LFEE treatment could suppress inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expressions, nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) productions, and pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin (IL)-1ß, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α) secretions in the LPS-mediated RAW264.7 cells. The attenuation of LPS-induced inflammatory responses by LFEE was closely related to inhibition of nuclear factor (NF)-κB p50/p65 subunits translocation correlated with suppressing inhibitor of κB kinase (IKK) α/β activation, and down-regulation of activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Janus kinase (JAK) 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3.
    Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 03/2014; · 3.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to determine if methanolic extract of black garlic (MEBG) has antiobesity effects via regulating lipid metabolism in an animal model. The results indicate that supplementation with MEBG decreased the final body weight; the relative masses of the liver and fat tissues; serum triacylglyceride levels; and hepatic oxidative stress and increased faecal lipid contents in HFD rats. Supplementation with MEBG upregulated AMPK, FOXO1, Sirt1, ATGL, HSL, perilipin, ACO, CPT-1, and UCP1 in the adipose tissues of HFD rats, whereas it downregulated CD36. Meanwhile, MEBG upregulated adiponectin and downregulated PAI-1, resistin, TNF-α, and GLUT4 in the adipose tissues of HFD rats. Regarding hepatic gene expression, MEBG upregulated AMPK, Sirt1, and PPARα but downregulated SREBP-1c, ACC, FAS, and SCD1. Therefore, MEBG can be developed as a potential nutraceutical ingredient for the prevention of obesity in a niche market.
    Journal of Functional Foods. 01/2014; 9:98–108.
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    ABSTRACT: Background Caffeate derivatives have been reported to exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities. To reveal the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of caffeate derivatives, we studied the effects of octyl, phenylpropyl, and decyl caffeates on cell growth and apoptosis in A549 human lung carcinoma cells. Methods A549 human lung carcinoma cells were treated with 0–100 μM of caffeate derivatives for 0–48 hours. The cytotoxic and apoptotic effects were evaluated by a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay for cell viability, propidium iodide staining method for cell morphology, mitochondrial membrane potential analysis, and Western blot for protein expression. Results Octyl, phenylpropyl, and decyl caffeates all significantly decreased the cell viability of A549 cells with 50% inhibitory concentration values of 54.2 ± 10.1 μM, 80.2 ± 1.3 μM, and 74.9 ± 2.1 μM, respectively. Propidium iodide staining revealed that apoptotic bodies appeared when cells were treated with octyl and decyl caffeates. Treatment of A549 cells with octyl and decyl caffeates caused the loss of mitochondria membrane potential. Western blots revealed that octyl and decyl caffeates stimulate an increase in the protein levels of Fas, FasL, and Apaf-1. Moreover, these compounds changed the levels of pro- and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family members and induced the activation of caspase-12, -9, and -3, which was followed by cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. Conclusion These results demonstrate that octyl and decyl caffeates induce cell apoptosis in A549 human lung carcinoma cells.
    Journal of the Chinese Medical Association 01/2014; · 0.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The contents of free hydrophobic amino acids, taurine and carnosine/anserine were elevated after hydrolyzing chicken livers by pepsin and compared to dried chicken livers. Chicken-liver-hydrolysates (CLHs) exhibited in vitro inhibitory lipase activity and bile-acid binding ability (p < 0.05). Forty-eight male hamsters were assigned randomly to the following groups: (1) chow diet; (2) high-fat diet (HFD); (3) HFD and 100 mg CLH/kg BW; (4) HFD and 200 mg CLH/kg BW; (5) HFD and 400 mg CLH/kg BW; (6) HFD and 200 mg carnosine/kg BW. CLHs alleviated (p < 0.05) serum oxidative stress and improved (p < 0.05) the serum lipid profile in the high-fat dietary groups; meanwhile, improved (p < 0.05) antioxidant abilities and decreased (p < 0.05) lipid accumulation, oxidative stress and TNF-α/IL-1β levels in the livers. These benefits might result from regulations of lipid homeostasis and increased faecal bile-acid outputs (p < 0.05). Hence, lipid-homeostasis and antioxidant abilities of CLHs in the high-fat dietary habit were demonstrated and were similar to pure carnosine.
    Food Chemistry 01/2014; 160:148–156. · 3.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective role of orally administered taurine against diabetic retinal changes via electroretinogram (ERG) and retinal histology on rabbits. Rabbits were randomly assigned into groups: Group I (vehicle administration only); Group II (diabetes: induced by 100 mg/kg alloxan injection); Group III (diabetes and fed with 200 mg/kg taurine); and Group IV (diabetes and fed with 400 mg/kg taurine). The body weight and blood glucose levels of the rabbits were monitored weekly. The ERG was measured on weeks 5 and 15. Retinal histology was analyzed in the end of the experiment. Results revealed that a taurine supplement significantly ameliorates the alloxan-induced hyperglycemia and protects the retina from electrophysiological changes. Group II showed a significant (P < 0.05) change in the mean scotopic b-wave amplitude when compared to that of Group I, whereas the diabetic rabbits treated with taurine (Group III and IV) were analogous to Group I. Histologically, the amount of Bipolar and Müller cells showed no difference (P > 0.05) between all groups and when compared with those of Group I. Our study provides solid evidences that taurine possesses an antidiabetic activity, reduced loss of body weight, and less electrophysiological changes of the diabetic retina.
    International journal of endocrinology. 01/2014; 2014:631549.
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    ABSTRACT: This study was divided into two parts: (i) an optimal hydrolysing procedure of chicken liver hydrolysates (CLHs) and (ii) the in vivo antioxidant properties of CLHs via a D-galactose-induced mouse model. A pepsin-to-raw chicken liver mass ratio (1:400, w:w) and 2-h hydrolysing period were chosen to manufacture CLHs based on yield, peptide level and antioxidant effect. Molecular masses of CLHs were lower than 10 kDa. CLH was rich in aspartic acid and glutamic acid, and also contained both manganese and selenium, which are essential cofactors of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, respectively. The contents of cadmium, mercury, tin, and arsenic in CLHs were very low and even no detectible. Regarding the in vivo antioxidant activity of CLHs, a dosage of 1.2 g D-galactose kg−1 body weight increased (P < 0.05) 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances values and decreased (P < 0.05) glutathione and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity values, as well as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities in serum and organs of mice. However, the in vivo antioxidant capacities were improved (P < 0.05) by supplementing CLHs.
    International Journal of Food Science & Technology 12/2013; · 1.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic alcohol consumption leads to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Naturally fermented noni juice (NJ) contains polyphenols, polysaccharides, and some trace minerals. This study was to explore protective effects of NJ against chronic alcohol consumption. Mice were assigned randomly to one of the following groups: (1) Control: control liquid diet and distilled water; (2) Alcohol: alcohol liquid diet and distilled water; (3) Alc+NJ_1X: alcohol liquid diet and 5 mL NJ/kg BW; (4) Alc+NJ_2X: alcohol liquid diet and 10 mL NJ/kg BW; (5) Alc+NJ_3X: alcohol and 15 mL NJ/kg BW for 4 weeks. NJ decreased (p<0.05) serum AST, ALT, and alcohol levels and liver lipids, as well as increased (p<0.05) daily fecal lipid outputs in alcohol-diet fed mice. NJ supplementation not only downregulated (p<0.05) lipogenesis but also upregulated (p<0.05) fatty-acid β-oxidation in livers of alcohol-diet fed mice. NJ also accelerated alcohol clearance via increased (p<0.05) hepatic ADH and ALDH activities. NJ increased (p<0.05) hepatic TEAC and GSH levels but decreased (p<0.05) TBARS value, and TLR2/4, P38, ERK 1/2, NFκB P65, iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, and IL-1β expressions in alcohol-diet fed mice. NJ promotes hepatoprotection against alcohol-induced injury due to regulations of lipid homeostasis, antioxidant status, alcohol metabolism, and antiinflammatory responses.
    Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 10/2013; · 3.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Polyphenols in noni juice (NJ) are mainly composed of phenolic acids, mainly gentisic, p-hydroxybenoic, and chlorogenic acids. To investigate the beneficial effects of NJ on the liver, hamsters were fed with two diets, normal-fat and high-fat diets. Furthermore, high-fat dietary hamsters were received distilled water, and 3, 6, and 9mL NJ/kg BW, respectively. After a 6-week feeding period, the increased (p<0.05) sizes of liver and visceral fat in high-fat dietary hamsters compared to the control hamsters were ameliorated (p<0.05) by NJ supplementation. NJ also decreased (p<0.05) serum/liver lipids but enhanced (p<0.05) daily faecal lipid/bile acid outputs in the high-fat dietary hamsters. High-fat dietary hamsters supplemented with NJ had higher (p<0.05) liver antioxidant capacities but lowered (p<0.05) liver iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, and IL-1β expressions, gelatinolytic levels of MMP9, and serum ALT values compared to those without NJ. Hence, NJ protects liver against a high-fat dietary habit via regulations of antioxidative and anti-inflammatory responses.
    Food Chemistry 09/2013; 140(1-2):31-8. · 3.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hepatic steatosis is defined as excessive amounts of triglyceride and other fats inside liver cells and has become an emergent liver disease in developed and developing countries. Deep seawater (DSW)300, DSW900, and DSW1500 drinking waters were formulated via a combination of reverse osmosis and electrodialysis. Hamsters on a high-fat diet were assigned to drink the following solutions: (1) normal distilled water, (2) DSW300, (3) DSW900, or (4) DSW1500. Serum, liver, and fecal biochemical values, expression of hepatic genes related to fatty-acid homeostasis, as well as liver antioxidative levels were measured after a 6-week feeding period. Additionally, hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to investigate the liver histopathology. Serum/liver lipids, liver sizes, liver malondialdehyde content, and serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase of high-fat diet hamsters were reduced (p < 0.05) by drinking DSW, while daily fecal lipid and bile acid outputs were increased (p < 0.05). DSW drinking water maintained (p < 0.05) higher liver glutathione and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity levels. Although hepatic sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase, and malic enzyme gene expression were not (p > 0.05) altered, DSW drinking water upregulated (p < 0.05) hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha, retinoid X receptor alpha, and uncoupling protein-2 gene expression in high-fat diet hamsters. The lipid droplets in livers were also reduced in DSW-drinking-water groups as compared to those only drinking distilled water. DSW shows a preventive effect on development of hepatosteatosis induced by a high-fat diet.
    Journal of the Chinese Medical Association 02/2013; 76(2):95-101. · 0.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Gentisic acid and epicatechin are two major compounds in phenolic acids and flavonoids of litchi-flower-water extracts (LFWEs), respectively. Increased (p < 0.05) serum lipids and liver size/lipid, damage/inflammatory indices, TBARS value, CRP level, MMP-9 activity, and decreased (p < 0.05) liver GSH and TEAC levels, and SOD, CAT and GSH-Px activities were observed in high-fat-diet fed hamsters compared to normal-fat-dietary hamsters. Those biochemical values of high-fat-diet fed hamsters were significant improved (p < 0.05) by drinking LFWEs. In addition, these improvements on liver damage induced by a high-fat diet were also evidenced in the histopathological examination of livers where less microvesicular steatosis and no necrotic/inflammatory cells were observed in high-fat-diet fed hamster drinking LFWEs. Therefore, protective effects of LFWEs on liver damage of high-fat-diet fed hamsters can be accounted for antioxidative properties and anti-inflammatory effects of LFWEs.
    Journal of Functional Foods. 01/2013; 5(1):44–52.
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    ABSTRACT: The effects of taurine (Tau) in regulation of lipid metabolism and decreasing inflammation in chronic alcohol-fed rats was investigated. Rats were randomly divided into three groups: (1) isocaloric solution; (2) 3 g alcohol/kg BW/day; (3) 3 g alcohol/kg BW/day + 1 g Tau/kg BW/day for 6 weeks. Liver size and serum/liver lipids of alcohol-fed rats were decreased (p < 0.05) by Tau supplementation, but daily fecal lipid/bile acid outputs were increased (p < 0.05). Regarding de novo lipogenesis, Tau downregulated (p < 0.05) fatty-acid biosynthesis and upregulated (p < 0.05) cholesterol metabolism (CYP7A1) and energy expenditure (PPAR-α). Serum AST and ALT, and hepatic TNF-α levels and MMP-9 activity of alcohol-fed rats were decreased (p < 0.05) by Tau supplementation which may be related to the maintenance of higher (p < 0.05) antioxidant levels (lower thiobarbituric-acid-reactive-substances values and higher trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity) in serum and livers. Our study indicates that Tau downregulates lipogenesis, oxidative stress, and inflammation in chronic alcohol-fed rats.
    Food Chemistry. 11/2012; 135(1):24–30.
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    ABSTRACT: Antioxidant, anti-proliferative and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitory activities of ethanolic extracts from freeze (EF) and hot air (EH) dried lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) leaves were evaluated. Phytochemical contents in the extracts were also determined. Hot air drying significantly lowered phytochemical contents and biological activities of the extract of lemon balm leaves as compared with freeze drying. EF had higher levels of phenols, phenolic acids, flavonoids, proanthocyanidins, ascorbic acid and γ-tocopherol than EH. Rosmarinic acid was the major compound and hesperetin was the highest level of flavonoid in the extracts. EF also presented higher antioxidant (β-carotene bleaching inhibition, scavenging 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radicals, reducing power and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity), anti-proliferative (proliferative inhibition for Hep G2, KB and TSGH 9201 human cancer cells) and COX-2 (induced by 12-O-teradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate in KB cells) suppressing activities than EH. The ethanolic extracts of lemon balm leaves, especially EF, may have the potential for cancer chemoprevention.
    LWT - Food Science and Technology. 11/2012; 49(1):1–7.
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    ABSTRACT: There is a close causal relationship between climate alteration and possible changes in zoonoses and animal diseases. Investigation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission has been considered of utmost concern regarding recent environmental sustainability issues. Among the indexes of evaluation of GHG emission, the calculation of the carbon footprint has been considered as the most direct method. In this report, the baseline of the carbon footprint of a 1 kg fresh milk product from the NTU teaching dairy farm was calculated using the ISO 14064 and PAS 2050 models, and further compared with the same category of products from other countries. Total carbon footprint calculation comprised of nine producing and selling stages including feed production, milk production, delivery to the processor, fresh milk processing, packaging, product distribution, retail marketing activities, consumer activities, and disposal. The results showed a 3.53 kg CO 2 emission per kg milk which is significantly higher than those of similar products from other countries. Since higher emission percentages were found in “fresh milk processing” and “product distribution” stages, it is suggested that replacing high energy-consumption machinery in the milk processing plant and optimizing the product-distribution protocol will effectively reduce total emissions. Additionally, it is suggested that the NTU farm records the wastes from cows to have the carbon emissions investigated more precisely. [Thong M, Chen YC, Liu TM, Wang YC, * Chou CH. Investigation the Carbon Footprint of Fresh Milk Product Produced by National Taiwan University Farm. Taiwan Vet J 39 (1): 66-72, 2013. * Corresponding author TEL: 886-2-3366 1291, FAX: 886-2-23649154, E-mail: cchou@ntu.edu.tw]
    Taiwan Veterinary. 10/2012; 39(1):66-72.
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    ABSTRACT: Carotenoids are effective antioxidants, which can quench singlet oxygen, suppress lipid peroxidation, and prevent oxidative damage. Both Pseudorabies virus (PRV) and human Herpes simplex virus (HSV) are DNA viruses, and their pathogenesis and immunobiology are similar. However, PRV does not infect humans. Therefore, PRV was used to infect murine macrophages (RAW264.7 cells), to mimic HSV-induced inflammation. Meanwhile, the influence of β-carotene on PRV-induced inflammation was also investigated. Results indicated that β-carotene inhibited (p<0.05) NO, IL-1β, IL-6, and MCP-1 production in PRV-infected RAW264.7 cells. β-Carotene also suppressed (p<0.05) NF-κB (p50 and p65), phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-related kinase (ERK), p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) expression. It could be concluded that the anti-inflammatory effect of β-carotene is mainly through a suppression of cytokine expression in PRV-induced inflammation, which results from NF-κB inactivation. β-Carotene can be considered a potential anti-inflammatory agent for DNA-virus infection.
    Food Chemistry 10/2012; 134(4):2169-75. · 3.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Eur J Clin Invest 2012 ABSTRACT: Background  Sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor that inhibits angiogenesis and carcinogenesis, has been used for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. However, sporadic cases have been reported with the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) after sorafenib treatment, mostly in those with cirrhosis. Liver function impairment, portal-systemic collaterals and brain oxidative stress participate in the pathogenesis of HE. The study therefore aimed to investigate the potential influences of sorafenib on HE and the relevant risk factors in cirrhotic rats. Methods  Liver cirrhosis was induced in Spraque-Dawley rats with common bile duct ligation (CBDL). CBDL rats received sorafenib 1 mg/kg/day or distilled water (DW) via oral gavage since the 15th day post surgery for 2 weeks. On the 28th day, after motor activities measurements, mean arterial pressure, portal pressure and heart rate were checked. Thereafter, cerebral cortex and cerebellum were dissected for oxidative stress study and blood was collected for liver biochemistry survey. Results  Sorafenib significantly reduced portal pressure (22%) and collateral shunting degree (15%) in cirrhotic rats. Alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, total bilirubin and ammonia were similar in sorafenib- and DW-treated groups. Motor activities were not significantly altered by sorafenib. In cerebrum, the oxidant and antioxidant substances activities were not significantly different between the two groups, whereas they were divergent in cerebellum and hippocampus. Conclusion  By surveying three main aspects involved in the pathogenesis of HE, this study demonstrates that sorafenib does not increase the risk of HE in cirrhotic rats.
    European Journal of Clinical Investigation 10/2012; · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Noni juice (NJ) is rich in phytochemicals and polysaccharides. Lipid-lowering and antioxidative effects of NJ were investigated in this study. Fifty male hamsters were assigned randomly to one of the following groups: (1) normal diet and distilled water (LFCD); (2) high-fat/cholesterol diet and distilled water (HFCD); (3) HFCD and 3 ml NJ (including 0.20 g solids)/kg BW (NJ_L); (4) HFCD and 6 mL NJ (including 0.40 g solids)/kg BW (NJ_M); (5) HFCD and 9 ml NJ (including 0.60 g solids)/kg BW (NJ_H) for six weeks. NJ supplementation decreased (p < 0.05) serum triacylglycerol, cholesterol, atherogenic index, malondialdehyde levels, and hepatic lipids in HFCD hamsters, whereas serum trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, glutathione, and fecal lipids in HFCD hamsters were increased (p < 0.05) by NJ supplementation. Although NJ supplementation downregulated (p < 0.05) sterol regulator element binding protein-1c in HFCD hamsters, it upregulated (p < 0.05) hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha and uncoupling protein 2 gene expressions in HFCD hamsters. Results demonstrate that NJ promotes cardioprotection in a high-fat/cholesterol diet.
    Plant Foods for Human Nutrition 09/2012; 67(3):294-302. · 2.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study examined the protective effects of taurine on alloxan-induced diabetic cataracts and lens damage in male New Zealand White rabbits. The animals were randomly divided into three treatment groups: (1) normal control (vehicle administration); (2) diabetes (100 mg/kg alloxan administration); and (3) diabetes + taurine (1% [w/v] taurine dissolved in drinking water and alloxan administration). The results showed that alloxan-induced diabetes caused significant (p < 0.05) hyperglycemia, hyperopic refraction shifts, cataract formation and lens damage compared with the normal control group. In contrast, the administration of taurine for 24 weeks significantly ameliorated the alloxan-induced elevated levels of blood glucose, level of hyperopic refraction error shifts in the eyes and progression of diabetic cataract formation in the lens in rabbits. Moreover, histopathology showed that the taurine supplement reduced the incidence of lens lesions induced by hyperglycemia. Overall, the studies demonstrate that taurine exhibits potent protective effects against alloxan-induced diabetic cataracts and refraction changes in rabbits.
    Experimental Eye Research 08/2012; 103:71-7. · 3.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The effects of scavenging 2, 2-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl hydrate (DPPH) radicals and inhibiting low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation, and phenolic quantities were used for the activity-guided separation to identify the effective components of litchi flower. The acetone extract of the flower with notable antioxidant capacities was suspended in water and sequentially partitioned with n-hexane, ethyl acetate (EA) and n-butanol. The EA partition with the highest phenolic levels and antioxidant capacities was subjected to silica gel column chromatography. Thirteen fractions (Fr. 1-13) were collected; Fr. 10-12 with higher phenolic levels and antioxidant effects were applied to Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography. Each fraction was further separated into three sub-fractions and the second ones (Fr. 10-II, 11-II, and 12-II) were the best, which two major compounds could be isolated by semi-preparative high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Through Mass (MS) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements, they could be identified as (-)-epicatechin and proanthocyanidin A2. Their contents in the litchi flower were 5.52 and 11.12 mg/g of dry weight, respectively. The study was the first time to reveal the effective antioxidant components of litchi flower.
    Food and chemical toxicology: an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association 06/2012; 50(9):3056-61. · 2.99 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

426 Citations
116.21 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2010–2014
    • National Taiwan University
      • Department of Animal Science and Technology
      T’ai-pei, Taipei, Taiwan
    • National Cheng Kung University
      • Department of BioMedical Engineering
      Tainan, Taiwan, Taiwan
    • Tainan University of Technology
      臺南市, Taiwan, Taiwan
  • 2011–2013
    • VGHKS Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital
      • Department of Surgery
      Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
    • National Chung Hsing University
      臺中市, Taiwan, Taiwan
    • Taichung Veterans General Hospital
      • Department of Internal Medicine
      臺中市, Taiwan, Taiwan
    • Chia-Yi Agricultural Experiment Station
      Chang-hua Pei-pu, Taiwan, Taiwan
  • 2007–2013
    • Chung Shan Medical University
      • • School of Nutrition
      • • Institute of Medicine
      Taichung, Taiwan, Taiwan
    • West Virginia University
      • Division of Animal and Nutritional Sciences
      Morgantown, WV, United States
  • 2009–2010
    • Ege University
      • Faculty of Fisheries
      İzmir, Izmir, Turkey