A Amorosi

University of Bologna, Bolonia, Emilia-Romagna, Italy

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Publications (199)468.32 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Litho-palaeoenvironmental Map of Italy during the Last Glacial maximum (22 ±2 ka cal BP) average air temperature of about 4.5°C lower than today; scale 1: ,000,000. Data: bed rocks; glaciers; loess; vertebrates; Ostracods; lakes; vegetation; Po plain; marine bathymetry; shore lines; Alpine foothills; sea surface temperature; archeology and active faults ResearchGate. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Lucilla_Capotondi/publications [accessed Mar 23, 2015].
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    ABSTRACT: A multi-proxy (stratigraphic, geomorphological, palynological, geophysical) study of mid-late Holocene deltaic-alluvial deposits beneath the Pisa Plain (Tuscany, Italy) reveals short-term enhances of fluvial activity under relative sea-level highstand (HST) conditions (last ~ 7000 cal yr BP). Early HST delta progradation led to the progressive infill of a broad lagoon area (~ 5000 cal yr BP), followed by the development of a stable alluvial depositional environment (~ 4000 cal yr BP). The intense phase of alluvial aggradation was punctuated by two events of enhanced fluvial incision that cut down to 10 m the underlying lagoonal substrate. The two erosive events, which reflect centennial-scale changes in the aggradation/degradation ratio, are chronologically constrained to the Eneolithic-Bronze age transition (~ 3800 cal yr BP) and to the Bronze–Iron age transition (2900-2800 cal yr BP), respectively.
    Palaeogeography Palaeoclimatology Palaeoecology 02/2015; 424. DOI:10.1016/j.palaeo.2015.02.020 · 2.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Responses of ecosystems to environmental changes vary greatly across habitats, organisms and observational scales. The Quaternary fossil record of the Po Basin demonstrates that marine communities of the northern Adriatic re-emerged unchanged following the most recent glaciation, which lasted approximately 100 000 years. The Late Pleistocene and Holocene interglacial ecosystems were both dominated by the same species, species turnover rates approximated predictions of resampling models of a homogeneous system, and comparable bathymetric gradients in species composition, sample-level diversity, dominance and specimen abundance were observed in both time intervals. The interglacial Adriatic ecosystems appear to have been impervious to natural climate change either owing to their persistence during those long-term perturbations or their resilient recovery during interglacial phases of climate oscillations. By contrast, present-day communities of the northern Adriatic differ notably from their Holocene counterparts. The recent ecosystem shift stands in contrast to the long-term endurance of interglacial communities in face of climate-driven environmental changes.
    Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 02/2015; 282(1803):1-8. DOI:10.1098/rspb.2014.2990 · 5.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite several studies have focused on the past bio-sedimentary response of the Mediterranean coastal areas to ancient seaport activities, only few geoarchaeological and palaeoecological data are available on strictly lacustrine harbours, to date. At the archaeological site of Magdala/Taricheae (Sea of Galilee, north Israel), an interdisciplinary study, combining ostracod fauna composition and shell chemistry with sedimentology, geochemistry of sediments and archaeological data, was undertaken on the sedimentary succession buried beneath the Roman harbour structures in correspondence of two key-sections. This approach provided detailed information about past environmental changes, otherwise not visible, into a high-resolution pottery-based chronological framework at the transition from a natural (pre-harbour) to anthropogenically influenced (harbour) lacustrine depositional setting.
    Journal of Archaeological Science 02/2015; 54:356-373. DOI:10.1016/j.jas.2014.05.010 · 2.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In marine settings, quantitative bathymetric models can be developed using various water depth proxies, including epibiont distribution, sedimentologic features, and the distribution of benthic taxa in time and space. Here, the late Quaternary bathymetric history of the Po coastal plain (Italy) has been reconstructed using mollusk samples from a network of 16 cores. Multiple analytical approaches have been applied in a comparative fashion. A direct ordination approach was used to estimate sample bathymetry using weighted averaging of genera with known preferred depth. Weighted averaging carries an advantage of analytical simplicity and produces direct ordination models expressed in environmentally meaningful units. Indirect ordination methods, based on depth estimates developed using posterioricalibrated ordination strategies (correspondence and detrended correspondence analysis calibrated against present-day bathymetric data), yielded results consistent with weighted averaging. Regardless of the choice of analytical methods, mollusk assemblages yielded bathymetric proxies congruent with independent sequence stratigraphic interpretations derived previously for both Late Pleistocene and Holocene transgressive-regressive cycles. The mollusk-derived proxies quantify spatial bathymetric gradients across the basin and local trends in absolute water depth in response to relative changes in sea level. However, for cores located in the most proximal part of the basin, mollusk-based ordinations failed to provide viable estimates due to inclusion of mixed marine and nonmarine mollusk faunas and scarcity of fossiliferous horizons necessary for adequate quantitative sampling. The multiple analytical approaches cross evaluated in this study consistently suggest that high-resolution quantitative bathymetric estimates can be derived for mollusk samples independent of stratigraphy for fully marine settings. When applied simultaneously to both samples and taxa, these approaches provide a viable strategy for quantifying stratigraphic and paleontological patterns and enhancing interpretations of basin-scale depositional systems.
    The Journal of Geology 11/2014; 122. DOI:10.1086/677901 · 2.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: One of the major issues when assessing soil contamination by inorganic substances is reliable determination of natural metal concentrations. Through integrated sedimentological, pedological and geochemical analyses of 1414 (topsoil/subsoil) samples from 707 sampling stations in the southern Po Plain (Italy), we document that the natural distribution of five potentially toxic metals (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb) can be spatially predicted as a function of three major factors: source-rock composition, grain size variability and degree of soil weathering. Thirteen genetic and functional soil units (GFUs), each reflecting a unique combination of these three variables, are fingerprinted by distinctive geochemical signatures. Where sediment is supplied by ultramafic (ophiolite-rich) sources, the natural contents of Cr and Ni in soils almost invariably exceed the Italian threshold limits designated for contaminated lands (150mg/kg and 120mg/kg, respectively), with median values around twice the maximum permissible levels (345mg/kg for Cr and 207mg/kg for Ni in GFU B5). The original provenance signal is commonly confounded by soil texture, with general tendency toward higher metal concentrations in the finest-grained fractions. Once reliable natural metal concentrations in soils are established, the anthropogenic contribution can be promptly assessed by calculating metal enrichments in topsoil samples. The use of combined sedimentological and pedological criteria to fingerprint GFU geochemical composition is presented here as a new approach to enhance predictability of natural metal contents, with obvious positive feedbacks for legislative purposes and environmental protection. Particularly, natural metal concentrations inferred directly from a new type of pedogeochemical map, built according to the international guideline ISO 19258, are proposed as an efficient alternative to the pre-determined threshold values for soil contamination commonly established by the national regulations.
    Science of The Total Environment 09/2014; 500-501C:361-372. DOI:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2014.08.078 · 3.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present new data collected at the Fronte composite section near Taranto, where the Upper Pleistocene marine sedimentary succession is continuously exposed. Above a fossiliferous calcarenite yielding the “Senegalese” fauna, and abundant Cladocora, the 230Th/U age of which is consistent with Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5, a 6.25 m thick pelitic unit is characterized by lithologically homogeneous marine sediments in which stable oxygen isotope, micropaleontological and palynological analyses suggest a long and undisturbed sedimentary interval across the Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5.5 peak (plateau). High sedimentation rates and a successful paleomagnetic pilot study indicate the probability of locating brief chronostratigraphic events useful for correlation with both continental and marine successions elsewhere. These results show the composite section to be a very promising candidate in the search for the Upper Pleistocene global boundary stratotype section and point (GSSP).
    Quaternary International 09/2014; DOI:10.1016/j.quaint.2014.08.057 · 2.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Fronte Section, a well-exposed stratigraphic succession from southern Italy (Taranto area), provides an uninterrupted marine sedimentary record of MIS 5e. At this location, a highly expanded (8.5 m thick) stratigraphic succession, unconformably overlying Middle Pleistocene marine clay deposits, provides evidence for sea-level fluctuations during the Last Interglacial. An integrated study of Fronte Section, including facies analysis, detailed macrofaunal and meiofaunal characterization, and sequence stratigraphy, is presented. The occurrence of Persististrombus latus (= Strombus bubonius) and other warm-water indicators (“Senegalaise” – “Senegalian” - guests of Gignoux, 1913), together with the presence of the dinocyst Polysphaeridium zoharyi and ten U-series dates on Cladocora caespitosa samples, permit an unequivocal MIS 5e age assignment to the upper part of the study succession. Above a stratigraphic unconformity marked by the boring coastal-lagoonal bivalve Pholas dactylus, the MIS 5e succession displays a first transgressive suite of brackish to shallow-marine deposits. These latter include highly fossiliferous muds rich in C. caespitosa, overlain by a fossil-rich calcarenite, 2 m-thick, yielding warm-water “Senegalian” molluscs. Above this prominent stratigraphic marker (regionally called panchina), which is interpreted to represent a short-lived phase of sea-level stillstand or gentle fall during MIS 5e, renewed transgression took place, leading to the accumulation of middle-outer shelf muds, about 5 m thick. The maximum flooding zone is clearly identified on the basis of the turnaround from a deepening-up to a shallowing-up trend. The upper part of Fronte Section records a second fossil-rich, sublittoral calcarenite containing warm-water molluscs, which is interpreted to reflect the subsequent phase of sea-level highstand, likely correlative with the MIS 5e plateau.
    Global and Planetary Change 08/2014; DOI:10.1016/j.gloplacha.2014.04.007 · 3.71 Impact Factor
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  • Alessandro Amorosi, Luigi Bruno, Bruno Campo, Agnese Morelli
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    ABSTRACT: Pocket penetrometer measurements, though commonly listed as accessory components of core descriptions, are almost totally ignored in shallow subsurface stratigraphic analysis. In this study, we prove that, if properly calibrated with core data, pocket penetration tests may serve as a quick and inexpensive tool to enhance high-resolution (palaeosol-based) stratigraphy of unconsolidated, late Quaternary non-marine deposits. A palaeosol sequence, made up of 12 vertically stacked, weakly developed palaeosols (Inceptisols) dated to the last 40 ky cal BP, is reconstructed from the subsurface of the southern Po Plain. The individual palaeosols exhibit flat to slightly undulating geometries and several of them can be tracked over distances of tens of km. They show substantially higher compressive strength coefficients than all other fine-grained, alluvial (floodplain) facies, being typified by distinctive penetration resistance, in the range of 3.5–5 kg/cm2. Along the palaeosol profiles, A and Bk horizons demonstrate consistent difference in relative compressive strengths, the highest values being almost invariably observed at the A/Bk boundary. Palaeosols are rarely described in conventional stratigraphic logs, and just a small proportion of them is likely to be identified by geologists with no specific sedimentological training. Through core–log calibration techniques, we document that vertical profiles of penetration resistance measured in the field can be used as an efficient method for palaeosol identification, and thus may represent a strategy for predicting stratigraphic architecture from limited core descriptions or poor-quality field logs. This technique allows to optimize the contribution of all available stratigraphic information, expanding significantly the coverage of well-described, one-dimensional core data. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Geological Journal 07/2014; DOI:10.1002/gj.2585 · 1.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Fronte Section, a well-exposed stratigraphic succession from southern Italy (Taranto area), provides an uninterrupted marine sedimentary record of MIS 5e. At this location, a highly expanded (8.5 m thick) stratigraphic succession, unconformably overlying Middle Pleistocene marine clay deposits, provides evidence for sea-level fluctuations during the Last Interglacial. An integrated study of Fronte Section, including facies analysis, detailed macrofaunal and meiofaunal characterization, and sequence stratigraphy, is presented. The occurrence of Persististrombus latus (= Strombus bubonius) and other warm-water indicators (“Senegalaise” – “Senegalian” – guests of Gignoux, 1913), together with the presence of the dinocyst Polysphaeridium zoharyi and ten U-series dates on Cladocora caespitosa samples, permit an unequivocal MIS 5e age assignment to the upper part of the study succession. Above a stratigraphic unconformity marked by the boring coastal-lagoonal bivalve Pholas dactylus, the MIS 5e succession displays a first transgressive suite of brackish to shallow-marine deposits. These latter include highly fossiliferous muds rich in C. caespitosa, overlain by a fossil-rich calcarenite, 2 m-thick, yielding warm-water “Senegalian” mollusks. Above this prominent stratigraphic marker (regionally called panchina), which is interpreted to represent a short-lived phase of sea-level stillstand or gentle fall during MIS 5e, renewed transgression took place, leading to the accumulation of middle-outer shelf muds, about 5 m thick. The maximum flooding zone is clearly identified on the basis of the turnaround from a deepening-up to a shallowing-up trend. The upper part of Fronte Section records a second fossil-rich, sublittoral calcarenite containing warm-water mollusks, which is interpreted to reflect the subsequent phase of sea-level highstand, likely correlative with the MIS 5e plateau.
    Global and Planetary Change 05/2014; 119:23-38. · 3.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Litho-palaeoenvironmental Map of Italy during the Last Glacial Maximum (22 ±2 ka cal BP) scale 1: ,000,000 Data: bed rocks; glaciers; loess; vertebrates; Ostracods; lakes; vegetation; Po plain; marine bathymetry; shore lines; Alpine foothills; sea surface temperature; archeology and active faults
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    ABSTRACT: Litho-palaeoenvironmental Map of Italy during the Holocene Climatic Optimum (8 ±1 ka cal BP) average surface air temperature of about 2°C higher than today; scale 1: ,000,000. Data: bed rocks; glaciers; loess; vertebrates; Ostracods; lakes; vegetation; Po plain; marine bathymetry; shore lines; Alpine foothills; sea surface temperature; archeology and active faults
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    ABSTRACT: Litho-palaeoenvironmental Map of Italy during the Last Glacial Maximum (22 ±2 ka cal BP) average air temperature of about 4.5 °C lower than today. 1:1,000,000 scale. Data: bed rocks; glaciers; loess; vertebrates; Ostracods; lakes; vegetation; Po plain; marine bathymetry; shore lines; Alpine foothills; sea surface temeprature; archeology and active faults.
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    ABSTRACT: Integrating analysis of the benthic palaeoecological record with multivariate ordination techniques represents a powerful synergy able to provide an improved characterization of coastal depositional facies in a sequence stratigraphical perspective. Through quantitative analysis of benthic foraminifer, ostracod and mollusc associations from the postglacial succession of Core M3 (Arno coastal plain, Tuscany, Italy), and application of detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) to the mollusc sub-data set, we offer a refined picture of stratigraphical variations in faunal content from a paralic depositional setting, and reconstruct the palaeoenvironmental gradients that account for such variations. Despite distinct ecological behaviours, and taphonomic and sedimentological constraints, a strong ecological control on meio- and macrofaunal biofacies and taxa turnover is documented across the study succession. Amongst all possible mechanisms that may play a role in ‘shaping’ fossil distribution, the ecological signal driven by salinity represents the most prominent factor controlling the composition of fossil associations in the cored succession. Molluscs can even provide outstanding quantitative estimates of palaeosalinity along the sampled core. When plotted stratigraphically, the three fossil sub-data sets show consistent patterns of vertical evolution that enable prompt identification of the key surfaces for sequence stratigraphical interpretation in otherwise lithologically indistinguishable deposits. The concomitant maximum richness of species with strong marine affinity, paralleled by the highest DCA salinity estimates, allows recognition of the maximum flooding zone, dated to ∼7.7 cal. ka BP, within a homogeneous succession of outer lagoon clays. These clays are sandwiched between early transgressive, swamp to inner lagoon deposits and overlying prograding coastal−alluvial plain facies.
    Boreas 04/2014; 43(4). DOI:10.1111/bor.12077 · 2.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Glauconitic minerals have long been appreciated as a reliable tool for sequence stratigraphic interpretation. A degree of maturity and occurrence of glauconite are closely related within a system tract context and substrate paleoenvironmental conditions. Within Oligo-Miocene shallow marine deposits of northern Tunisian outcrops, the glauconite occurs as thin (few centimeters) to moderate thick (1 m) clay and fine grain size sandstone horizons which are superbly exposed at many localities. Sedimentological investigations data indicate that these glaucony-bearing strata are deposited under shallow water shelfal and lagoonal siliciclastic depositional systems. Geochemical analysis from nine glaucony samples shows that Oligocene glaucony is invariably more evolved (K2O = 6–8 %) than Miocene glaucony, which is typically slightly evolved (K2O = 4–6 %). Vertical changes in glaucony maturity are consistent with sequence-stratigraphic interpretation, showing in general an upward increase in the transgressive systems tract. Maximum glaucony concentration is recorded corresponding to the maximum flooding surface/condensed section. Comparison of glaucony characteristics across different depositional systems at the same stratigraphic level shows a slight decrease in maturity and abundance from distal to proximal locations. This lateral tendency reflects more suitable conditions for glauconitization in open-marine environments than in shallow waters.
    Arabian Journal of Geosciences 03/2014; 8(3). DOI:10.1007/s12517-014-1288-z · 1.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Paleosol stratigraphy, a technique commonly applied in basin–margin settings to depict cyclic alluvial architecture on time scales of 10–100 ky, can be consistent with regional accommodation trends at even higher temporal resolution (1–10 ky), having strong implications for the sequence stratigraphy of late Quaternary, non-marine deposits. Three closely-spaced late Pleistocene paleosols (P1–P3), dating back approximately to 42–39, 35–31, and 29–26 cal kyr BP, respectively, form prominent stratigraphic markers across a lithologically homogeneous interfluve succession in the subsurface of Bologna, close to the Apenninic foothills. These paleosols are weakly developed (Inceptisols) and can be tracked continuously for 6 km across the triangle-shaped interchannel zone between two gravel/sand-filled channel systems (Reno and Savena rivers). In particular, the thickest paleosol (P3) is a distinctive stiff horizon that can be traced into laterally extensive, erosional-based fluvial bodies. We infer the correlation between (P3) soil development (and channel downcutting) and the final stage of the stepwise Late Pleistocene sea-level fall that culminated at the marine isotope stage 3/2 transition around 29 cal kyr BP (low accommodation systems tract). A fourth laterally extensive Inceptisol, encompassing the Pleistocene–Holocene boundary (PH), represents the major phase of soil development since the Last Glacial Maximum and is inferred to be related to channel entrenchment at the onset of the Younger Dryas. With the exception of the Iron Age-Roman paleosol, which reflects a predominantly anthropogenic control, the Holocene paleosols are laterally discontinuous and invariably more immature (Entisols) than their Pleistocene counterparts. This trend of decreasing paleosol development (and correlatability) upsection is interpreted to reflect increasing (transgressive-equivalent) accommodation during sea-level rise, thus confirming the possible extension of models used to interpret the ancient rock record to short-term depositional cycles.
    Global and Planetary Change 01/2014; 112:12–25. DOI:10.1016/j.gloplacha.2013.10.007 · 3.71 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

3k Citations
468.32 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1995–2015
    • University of Bologna
      • Department of Biological, Geological and Environmental Sciences BiGeA
      Bolonia, Emilia-Romagna, Italy
    • Leidos Biomedical Research
      Maryland, United States
  • 2008–2012
    • Universita' degli Studi "Magna Græcia" di Catanzaro
      • Department of Health Sciences
      Catanzaro, Calabria, Italy
  • 2009
    • Università degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro
      Bari, Apulia, Italy
    • Civil Protection Department of Italy
      Roma, Latium, Italy
    • University of the West of England, Bristol
      • Department of Geography and Environmental Management
      Bristol, England, United Kingdom
  • 2007
    • Sapienza University of Rome
      Roma, Latium, Italy
  • 2004
    • Università Politecnica delle Marche
      Ancona, The Marches, Italy
  • 1997–2002
    • University of Florence
      • Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sperimentali e Cliniche
      Florence, Tuscany, Italy
    • University Medical Center Hamburg - Eppendorf
      Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany
  • 2000
    • University of Hamburg
      Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany
  • 1998
    • NCI-Frederick
      Maryland, United States