Jeffrey J Teuteberg

University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States

Are you Jeffrey J Teuteberg?

Claim your profile

Publications (129)281.62 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: -Despite low risk of late rejection after heart transplant (HT), surveillance endomyocardial biopsies (EMB) are often continued for years. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of routine EMB beyond 12 months post-HT.
    Circulation Heart Failure 08/2014; · 6.68 Impact Factor
  • Jeffrey J Teuteberg, Josephine C Chou
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cardiogenic shock remains a leading cause of mortality despite advances in the treatment of myocardial infarction and advanced heart failure. Medical therapy can be inadequate, and patients may need mechanical circulatory support (MCS). The proper application of MCS requires knowledge of the underlying cause of acute heart failure, familiarity with the circulatory support devices, and the potential benefits and limitations of device therapy. This article describes the most commonly used temporary ventricular assist devices and their use in the various causes of cardiogenic shock.
    Critical care clinics. 07/2014; 30(3):585-606.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The malignancy rate after alemtuzumab (C-1H) induction in cardiac transplantation is unknown.
    Transplantation Proceedings 06/2014; 46(5):1481-8. · 0.95 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Preoperative liver dysfunction may influence haemostasis following ventricular assist device (VAD) implantation. The Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score was assessed as a predictor of bleeding and levels of haemostatic markers in patients with currently utilized VADs. Sixty-three patients (31 HeartMate II, 15 HeartWare, 17 Thoratec paracorporeal ventricular assist device) implanted 2001-11 were analysed for preoperative liver dysfunction (MELD) and blood product administration. Of these patients, 21 had additional blood drawn to measure haemostatic marker levels. Cohorts were defined based on high (≥18.0, n = 7) and low (<18.0, n = 14) preoperative MELD scores. MELD score was positively correlated with postoperative administration of red blood cell (RBC), platelet, plasma and total blood product units (TBPU) , as well as chest tube drainage and cardiopulmonary bypass time. Age and MELD were preoperative predictors of TBPU by multivariate analysis. The high-MELD cohort had higher administration of TBPU, RBC and platelet units and chest tube drainage postimplant. Similarly, patients who experienced at least one bleeding adverse event were more likely to have had a high preoperative MELD. The high-MELD group exhibited different temporal trends in F1 + 2 levels and platelet counts to postoperative day (POD) 55. D-dimer levels in high-MELD patients became elevated versus those for low-MELD patients on POD 55. Preoperative MELD score predicts postoperative bleeding in contemporary VADs. Preoperative liver dysfunction may also alter postoperative subclinical haemostasis through different temporal trends of thrombin generation and platelet counts, as well as protracted fibrinolysis.
    European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery: official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery 05/2014; · 2.40 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Gene expression profiling test scores have primarily been used to identify heart transplant recipients who have a low probability of rejection at the time of surveillance testing. We hypothesized that the variability of gene expression profiling test scores within a patient may predict risk of future events of allograft dysfunction or death. Patients from the IMAGE study with rejection surveillance gene expression profiling tests performed at 1- to 6-month intervals were selected for this cohort study. Gene expression profiling score variability was defined as the standard deviation of an individual's cumulative test scores. Gene expression profiling ordinal score (range, 0-39), threshold score (binary value=1 if ordinal score ≥34), and score variability were studied in multivariate Cox regression models to predict future clinical events. Race, age at time of transplantation, and time posttransplantation were significantly associated with future events in the univariate analysis. In the multivariate analyses, gene expression profiling score variability, but not ordinal scores or scores over threshold, was independently associated with future clinical events. The regression coefficient P values were <0.001, 0.46, and 0.773, for gene expression profiling variability, ordinal, and threshold scores, respectively. The hazard ratio for a 1 unit increase in variability was 1.76 (95% CI, 1.4-2.3). The variability of a heart recipient's gene expression profiling test scores over time may provide prognostic utility. This information is independent of the probability of acute cellular rejection at the time of testing that is rendered from a single ordinal gene-expression profiling test score.
    Transplantation 03/2014; 97(6):708-14. · 3.78 Impact Factor
  • Echocardiography 03/2014; 31(3). · 1.26 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Gene expression profiling test scores have primarily been used to identify heart transplant recipients who have a low probability of rejection at the time of surveillance testing. We hypothesized that the variability of gene expression profiling test scores within a patient may predict risk of future events of allograft dysfunction or death. Patients from the IMAGE study with rejection surveillance gene expression profiling tests performed at 1- to 6-month intervals were selected for this cohort study. Gene expression profiling score variability was defined as the standard deviation of an individual's cumulative test scores. Gene expression profiling ordinal score (range, 0-39), threshold score (binary value=1 if ordinal score ≥34), and score variability were studied in multivariate Cox regression models to predict future clinical events. Race, age at time of transplantation, and time posttransplantation were significantly associated with future events in the univariate analysis. In the multivariate analyses, gene expression profiling score variability, but not ordinal scores or scores over threshold, was independently associated with future clinical events. The regression coefficient P values were <0.001, 0.46, and 0.773, for gene expression profiling variability, ordinal, and threshold scores, respectively. The hazard ratio for a 1 unit increase in variability was 1.76 (95% CI, 1.4-2.3). The variability of a heart recipient's gene expression profiling test scores over time may provide prognostic utility. This information is independent of the probability of acute cellular rejection at the time of testing that is rendered from a single ordinal gene-expression profiling test score.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 License, where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially.
    Transplantation 01/2014; · 3.78 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background The malignancy rate after alemtuzumab (C-1H) induction in cardiac transplantation is unknown. Methods A retrospective analysis from a single center for all patients that underwent cardiac transplantation from January 2000 to January 2011 and that had no history of malignancy before transplantation was performed. Patients induced with alemtuzumab were compared with a group of patients receiving thymoglobulin or no induction and assessed for 4-year cancer-free post–heart transplantation survival. Results Of 402 patients included, 185 (46.0%) received alemtuzumab, 56 (13.9%) thymoglobulin, and 161 (40.0%) no induction. Baseline characteristics did not differ between groups: mean age 54.0 years, male 77.1%, white 88.6%, ischemic cardiomyopathy 49.0%. The calcineurin inhibitor was tacrolimus in 98.9% of alemtuzumab patients, 98.2% of thymoglobulin patients, and 87.0% of the noninduced (P < .001). The secondary agent was mycophenolate mofetil in all but 16 noninduced patients (9.9%), who received azathioprine. The 4-year cancer-free survival did not differ between groups: 88.1% alemtuzumab, 87.5% thymoglobulin, 88.2% noninduction; P = .088. The 4-year nonskin cancer–free survival was 96.8% for the alemtuzumab group, 96.4% for the thymoglobulin group, and 95.7% for the noninduced; P = .899. Conclusions Neither the 4-year cancer-free survival nor the 4-year nonskin cancer–free survival differed between the alemtuzumab, thymoglobulin, and noninduced groups.
    Transplantation Proceedings 01/2014; 46(5):1481–1488. · 0.95 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objectives A post approval (PA) study for destination therapy (DT) was required by FDA to determine whether results with the HeartMate (HM) II Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) in a commercial setting are comparable to results during the DT multicenter pivotal clinical trial. Background New device technology developed in the clinical research setting requires validation in a real world setting Methods The PA study was a prospective evaluation of the first 247 HM II patients identified pre-operatively as DT in the national INTERMACS registry. Patients were enrolled from Jan - Sep 2010 at 61 US centers and followed for two years. A historical comparison group included patients (n=133 at 34 centers) enrolled in the primary data cohort in the DT pivotal trial (TR). Survival rates and adverse events for PA were obtained in the INTERMACS registry. Results Baseline characteristics were similar for PA vs TR. PA patients were 45% INTERMACS profile 1-2 and 28% profile 3. Adverse events in the PA group were similar or lower than TR, including improvements in device-related infection (0.22 vs 0.47) and post-operative bleeding requiring surgery (0.09 vs 0.23) events/pt-yr. Kaplan Meier survival at 2 years was 62% (PA) vs 58% (TR). PA survival at 1 and 2 years was 82±5% and 69±6% for INTERMACS profiles 4-7 (n=63) vs 72±3% and 60±4% for profiles 1-3 (n=184). The median length of stay after surgery was reduced by 6 days in PA vs TR. Conclusions Results in a commercial patient care setting for the DT population support the original pivotal clinical trial findings regarding the efficacy and risk profile of the HM II LVAD. Survival was best in patients not yet inotrope dependent (INTERMACS 4-7).
    Journal of the American College of Cardiology 01/2014; 31(4):S10. · 14.09 Impact Factor
  • Jonathan Holtz, Jeffrey Teuteberg
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: With the current generation of continuous-flow (CF) left ventricular assist devices (LVADs), patients are able to be supported for longer periods of time. As a result, there has been increasing focus on long-term complications from prolonged mechanical circulatory support, such as acquired aortic insufficiency (AI). In the presence of an LVAD, AI leads to a blind circulatory loop, with a portion of LVAD output regurgitating through the aortic valve (AV) into the left ventricle and back again through the device, limiting effective forward flow and ultimately leading to organ malperfusion and increased left ventricular diastolic pressures. The AV also experiences abnormal biomechanics as a result of limited valve opening in the presence of a CF LVAD. Increased shear stress, elevated transvalvular pressure gradients, and decreased valve open time all contribute to acquired AI. The prognosis of moderate to severe AI in LVAD patients is generally poor and leads to a higher rate of AV replacement and potentially reduced survival. However, there are no evidence-based guidelines for management of this challenging population. In severe AI, experts generally advocate AV replacement or repair, while lesser degrees of AI can be managed medically and/or with adjustments in pump parameters.
    Current Heart Failure Reports 11/2013;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Individual ventricular assist device (VAD) design may affect leukocytes and impact immunity. Few studies have presented leukocyte and infection profiles in VAD patients over the course of the implant period. CD11b (MAC-1) expression on granulocytes is an indicator of activation during inflammation, mediating extravasation and the release of reactive oxygen species in tissue. No reported studies have presented MAC-1 expression on circulating granulocytes in VAD patients. Fifty-six patients implanted at a single center with a HeartMate II (HMII; n = 32), HeartWare (HW; n = 12), or Thoratec pneumatic VAD (PVAD; n = 12) between 1999 and 2011 were followed for 120 days of support. The leukocyte profiles and infectious events of all patients were evaluated; additionally, a subset had MAC-1 expression on circulating granulocytes was measured (HMII n = 9; HW n = 7; PVAD n = 4). All groups exhibited a significant peak in leukocyte numbers at postoperative day (POD) 14 while simultaneously experiencing a significant decrease in hematocrit. HMII patients exhibited a 3.2-fold increase in granulocyte MAC-1 expression at POD 14, and the temporal trend over the implant period differed from that experienced by HW patients. Further, HW patients experienced significantly fewer infection events. Alterations in leukocyte profiles and granulocyte activation experienced by VAD patients appear to be device-specific. Elevations in leukocyte activation may be related to an increased risk for infection, although the specific relationship between these phenomena in this patient group is not known.
    Artificial Organs 11/2013; · 1.96 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Continuous flow (CF) left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) are afterload sensitive and therefore pump performance is affected by hypertension. In addition, poorly controlled hypertension may increase the risk of aortic insufficiency (AI) and stroke. Blood pressure regimens after CF LVAD have not been studied and their impact on rates of AI and stroke are unknown. Patients who had CF LVAD at a single center and were supported greater than 30 days were included. Blood pressure was monitored at home by Doppler. Outpatient management of blood pressure was conducted according to a predefined institutional protocol (target mean arterial pressure ≤80 mm Hg). A total of 96 patients were included. At the end of follow-up, 25 patients were not on an antihypertensive drug, of these 9 died. Of the 74% receiving antihypertensives, 54% required 1 medication, 34% were on 2, 10% were on 3, and 3% were on 4 or more. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers (85% of patients on an antihypertensive) and beta blockers (30%) were the most commonly prescribed medications. There was a significantly higher neurologic event rate in those on no antihypertensives compared with those on antihypertensives (p = 0.009). Only 3% of patients with no or mild AI at baseline progressed to develop moderate or greater AI after a mean of 201 days of follow-up. Blood pressure control can be achieved in patients with CF LVADs, with the majority of patients requiring only 1 or 2 antihypertensives.
    The Annals of thoracic surgery 09/2013; · 3.45 Impact Factor
  • Omar Batal, Howard Brumberg, Jeffrey J Teuteberg, William E Katz
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The left atrium (LA) in the transplanted heart (TH) is a surgically created chamber from variable portions of donor and recipient LA. The American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) recommends measuring LA size in native hearts using biplane LA volume index (LAVI) as a more accurate measurement than LA anterior-posterior diameter (LA-APD). We hypothesized that LA-APD underestimates LA size when compared with LAVI in the TH. Patients with a TH from 1/05 to 1/10 who had a transthoracic echocardiogram within 24 months of transplant were studied. Patients were excluded if they had an ejection fraction <50%, left ventricular hypertrophy, >mild aortic or mitral regurgitation, or poor image quality. Echocardiograms were analyzed for LA-APD and LAVI. LA size was classified as normal, mild, moderate, or severely enlarged based on age and sex specific cutoffs per the ASE. Of 297 patients evaluated, 160 met inclusion criteria. Mean age was 57 ± 13 years and 79% were males. Mean LA-APD and LAVI were 4.3 ± 0.6 cm and 36 ± 14 mL/m(2) , respectively. LAVI correlated with LA-APD (r = 0.43, R(2) = 0.18, P < 0.0001). By LA-APD measurement, 20 (13%) LA were classified as having moderate or severe LA enlargement versus 80 (50%) by LAVI, P = 0.001. LA size was underclassified by ≥2 classes in 44 (28%) by LA-APD versus LAVI. In the setting of cardiac transplant, the LA size classified by LA-APD is commonly less than that classified by LAVI.
    Echocardiography 09/2013; · 1.26 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a novel intravascular imaging modality with excellent spatial resolution. This study explored the utility of OCT in cardiac transplantation for the detection and characterization of early changes associated with coronary allograft vasculopathy (CAV). METHODS: Fifteen consecutive patients, 1 to 4 years after transplant with no angiographic evidence of CAV, underwent successful OCT imaging using the Fourier-domain OCT system (C7-XR, St. Jude Medical, St. Paul, MN) in the left anterior descending artery. Analysis included measurements of the lumen, intima, and media layers, and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. Patients were stratified by intima-to-media (I/M) ratio and classified as normal (≤1) or abnormal (>1). RESULTS: Patients were a mean of 2.8 years after transplant, 58 years old, and 92% were men. OCT imaging revealed 8 of 15 patients had intimal hyperplasia with an I/M ratio >1. Comparing those with I/M ratio of ≤1 and >1, the median (interquartile range) intimal thickness was greater (75 [70-101] vs 206 [97-269]μm, p = 0.03), whereas the media thickness was no different (72 [70-103] vs 94 [73-113]μm, p = 0.53). In addition, 7 of 15 patients had lipid-rich or calcified atherosclerotic plaques. CONCLUSIONS: OCT provides high-resolution quantitative imaging of the coronary arteries and its use allows for detailed assessment of the coronary artery wall and early morphologic changes that occur after cardiac transplantation. The clinical predictive value of these OCT-derived measurements remains to be determined.
    The Journal of heart and lung transplantation: the official publication of the International Society for Heart Transplantation 03/2013; · 3.54 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has historically been associated with sub-optimal survival compared with other indications for transplantation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate survival outcomes after heart transplantation in a contemporary cohort of adults with CHD and to identify risk factors for mortality that may help guide recipient and donor selection. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of our adult heart transplant database, from January 2001 to February 2011, identifying 19 patients who underwent transplantation for CHD. These patients were compared with a control group of 428 patients who underwent transplantation for indications other than CHD. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox regression modeling were performed. RESULTS: The mean age for the CHD group was 39.4 ± 13 years vs 54.7 ± 12 years (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in survival (CHD vs control) at 30 days (89% vs 92%, p = 0.5567), 1 year (84% vs 86%, p = 0.6976) or 5 years (70% vs 72%, p = 0.8478). The only significant predictor of death in the CHD group was donor organ ischemic time >4 hours (HR 13.26, 95% CI 1.3 to 132.2, p = 0.028). There was no significant correlation with recipient age, history of failed Fontan surgery, pre-operative ventilator use, donor:recipient weight ratio <0.8, donor:recipient CMV mismatch, model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score or percent reactive antibody >10%. CONCLUSIONS: In the modern era, with careful donor and recipient selection, adults with CHD have excellent early and mid-term survival after heart transplantation, rivaling that of recipients with other indications for transplantation.
    The Journal of heart and lung transplantation: the official publication of the International Society for Heart Transplantation 03/2013; · 3.54 Impact Factor
  • Genevieve O'Shea, Jeffrey J Teuteberg, Donald A Severyn
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Ventricular assist devices provide therapeutic options for patients with severe heart failure who have exhausted available medical therapies. With restoration of organ perfusion with ventricular assist devices, the heart failure resolves and quality of life and functional status improve. The current generation of continuous-flow devices present novel challenges to the clinical assessment of patients by substantially reducing or nearly eliminating any palpable pulse. Patients therefore generally have inadequate arterial pulsatility for most noninvasive monitoring devices such as pulse oximeters or automated blood pressure cuffs to work accurately. This article describes the function of continuous-flow devices and how this function affects common monitoring options, as well as how to clinically assess recipients of continuous-flow devices to promptly identify those whose condition may be deteriorating or who may be receiving inadequate perfusion.
    Progress in transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.) 03/2013; 23(1):39-46. · 0.81 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A patient with a HeartMate II left ventricular assist device who had a body mass index of 52 needed gastric bypass surgery in order to qualify for a heart transplant. Unlike previous experience in which the surgery was performed at the implant hospital, the gastric bypass surgery in this case was performed at a bariatric center of excellence that was a separate facility from the implant hospital. The artificial heart program of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center worked with the bariatric center of excellence in scheduling the gastric bypass surgery using a multidisciplinary team approach at 2 hospitals to coordinate safe, high-quality patient care in a unique situation.
    Progress in transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.) 03/2013; 23(1):28-32. · 0.81 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: CO-CHAIRS: Feldman D: Minneapolis Heart Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Georgia Institute of Technology and Morehouse School of Medicine; Pamboukian SV: University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama; Teuteberg JJ: University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania TASK FORCE CHAIRS: Birks E: University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky; Lietz K: Loyola University, Chicago, Maywood, Illinois; Moore SA: Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Morgan JA: Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Arabia F: Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona; Bauman ME: University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada; Buchholz HW: University of Alberta, Stollery Children's Hospital and Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; Deng M: University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; Dickstein ML: Columbia University, New York, New York; El-Banayosy A: Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania; Elliot T: Inova Fairfax, Falls Church, Virginia; Goldstein DJ: Montefiore Medical Center, New York, New York; Grady KL: Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois; Jones K: Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Australia; Hryniewicz K: Minneapolis Heart Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota; John R: University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Kaan A: St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Kusne S: Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona; Loebe M: Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas; Massicotte P: University of Alberta, Stollery Children's Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; Moazami N: Minneapolis Heart Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Mohacsi P: University Hospital, Bern, Switzerland; Mooney M: Sentara Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Virginia; Nelson T: Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona; Pagani F: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Perry W: Integris Baptist Health Care, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Potapov EV: Deutsches Herzzentrum Berlin, Berlin, Germany; Rame JE: University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Russell SD: Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland; Sorensen EN: University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland; Sun B: Minneapolis Heart Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Strueber M: Hannover Medical School, Hanover, Germany INDEPENDENT REVIEWERS: Mangi AA: Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut; Petty MG: University of Minnesota Medical Center, Fairview, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Rogers J: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina.
    The Journal of heart and lung transplantation: the official publication of the International Society for Heart Transplantation 02/2013; 32(2):157-87. · 3.54 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objectives This study investigated how the initial intended strategy at left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation influenced patient outcomes. Background Left ventricular assist device implantation strategy impacts candidate selection, reimbursement, and clinical trial design; however, concepts of device strategy are continuing to evolve. Methods For patients entered in the INTERMACS (Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support) receiving a primary continuous flow LVAD between March 2006 and March 2011, initial strategies were bridge to transplant (BTT), bridge to candidacy (BTC) for transplant, and destination therapy (DT). Primary analyses compared BTT, BTC, and DT outcomes at 6, 12, and 24 months. Results Among 2,816 primary LVAD recipients, implant strategy was 1,060 (38%) BTT, 1,162 (42%) BTC (likely to be listed 796, moderately likely 282, unlikely 84), and 553 (20%) DT. Compared with BTC/DT, those listed at implant (BTT) had similar degrees of ventricular dysfunction and hemodynamic derangement but generally less comorbidity. Survival (alive with LVAD or transplanted) was superior at 24 months for BTT versus BTC versus DT (77.7% vs.70.1% vs. 60.7%, respectively, p < 0.0001). Strategic intent changed over time, at 2 years 43.5% of BTT patients were no longer listed for transplant, but 29.3% of BTC patients were listed for transplant. Conclusions The currently accepted indications only account for 58% of LVAD implants. Across indications, patients differ by the number and types of comorbidities rather than the need for hemodynamic support. Regardless of initial implant strategy, patients often have long durations of support, and strategies often change over time, challenging the regulatory categorization of LVAD recipients as either BTT or DT.
    JACC: Heart Failure. 01/2013; 1(5):369–378.
  • Source

Publication Stats

881 Citations
281.62 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2005–2014
    • University of Pittsburgh
      • Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery
      Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2012
    • University of Pennsylvania
      • Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery
      Philadelphia, PA, United States
    • Yale-New Haven Hospital
      New Haven, Connecticut, United States
    • University of California, San Francisco
      • Division of Cardiology
      San Francisco, CA, United States
  • 2011–2012
    • Carnegie Mellon University
      • Department of Biomedical Engineering
      Pittsburgh, PA, United States
  • 2010
    • Stanford Medicine
      Stanford, California, United States
    • Aurora St. Luke's Medical Center
      Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States
  • 2008
    • Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania
      • Department of Medicine
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2007
    • Brigham and Women's Hospital
      • Department of Medicine
      Boston, MA, United States