Tae-Hoe Koo

Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Seoul, South Korea

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Publications (17)28.86 Total impact

  • Jungsoo Kim, Tae-Hoe Koo
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    ABSTRACT: Zinc, copper, lead and cadmium were measured in the livers, kidneys and bones of Terek Sandpipers (Xenus cinereus), Great Knots (Calidris tenuirostris) and Red-necked Stints (Calidris ruficollis) from the Okgu Mudflat, Korea. Zinc concentrations in bones were significantly higher in Terek Sandpipers than the other two species and differed among tissues in Terek Sandpipers. Copper concentrations in kidneys and bones but not livers differed among species. Copper concentrations in Terek Sandpipers and Great Knots differed among tissues. Zinc and copper concentrations from this study were similar to those reported for other shorebirds. Lead concentrations significantly differed among all species for each tissue and among tissues for each species. Cadmium concentrations were significantly different among species for all tissues and among tissues in Great Knots and Red-necked Stints. In Red-necked Stints, lead and cadmium concentrations in each tissue were higher than the background levels for wild birds and both metals were considerably greater that reported previously for shorebirds. Cadmium concentrations in Terek Sandpipers and Great Knots were similar to concentrations reported in other shorebirds. In Terek Sandpipers and Great Knots, lead concentrations showed chronic exposure but not in Red-necked Stints. Cadmium concentrations showed chronic exposure in all three shorebird species.
    Journal of Environmental Monitoring 08/2010; 12(8):1613-8. · 2.09 Impact Factor
  • Jungsoo Kim, Tae-Hoe Koo, Jong-Min Oh
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    ABSTRACT: This study presents concentrations of iron, zinc, manganese, lead and cadmium in livers and kidneys of Little Egret Egretta garzetta (n = 10) and Black-crowned Night-Heron Nycticorax nycticorax (n = 10) chicks from Pyeongtaek, Gyeonggi-do, Korea. Essential element concentrations such as iron, zinc and manganese did not differ between both species chicks in livers and kidneys, but lead and cadmium concentrations were significantly greater in both tissues of Little Egret chicks (lead 2.78 +/- 4.06 microg/g wet weight, cadmium 10.3 +/- 12.8 kg/g wet weight) than in those of Black-crowned Night-Heron chicks (lead 0.92 +/- 0.73 microg/g wet weight, cadmium 1.00 +/- 1.00 kg/g wet weight). Lead and cadmium concentrations in livers of Black-crowned Night-Heron chicks were highly related to sediment and/or prey concentrations of their foraging sites in Korean studies. It shows that lead and cadmium concentrations in livers of heron chicks can reflect those of surrounding environment of breeding sites. In this study, cadmium concentrations were higher in kidneys than in livers and it's not recent high-level exposure but chronic background exposure to cadmium contamination around breeding site. Therefore, we suggest that cadmium concentrations in livers and kidneys can be used as a bioindicator of acute and/or chronic local contamination.
    Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 06/2010; 84(6):754-8. · 1.11 Impact Factor
  • Jungsoo Kim, Doo-Pyo Lee, Tae-Hoe Koo
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    ABSTRACT: This study presents concentrations of heavy metals in tissues of Black-crowned night herons (Nycticorax nycticorax), age-related variations related to the growth stage from chicks to adults, and comparison of concentrations between chicks and adults. Heavy metal differences by growth stage from chicks to adults were observed for iron concentrations in the muscle; manganese concentrations in the kidney; zinc and copper concentrations in the muscle; lead concentrations in the liver, kidney, and bone; and cadmium concentrations in the kidney. Comparing chicks with adults, iron concentrations in the kidney and bone of adults were higher than those of chicks. Copper concentrations in the muscle of adults were higher than those of chicks. Lead concentrations in the liver and bone were lower in adults than in chicks. Manganese, zinc and cadmium concentration of each tissue did not significantly differ between adults and chicks. We suggest that concentrations of iron, manganese, zinc and copper varied with the metabolic turnover for growth of chicks. In this study, lead concentrations of adults and cadmium concentrations of chicks and adults were within the range of background levels for wild birds, only lead concentrations of chicks were within the range of a level consistent with elevated lead exposure.
    Journal of Environmental Monitoring 03/2010; 12(3):600-7. · 2.09 Impact Factor
  • Jungsoo Kim, Hwa-Su Lee, Tae-Hoe Koo
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    ABSTRACT: Iron, zinc, copper, lead, and cadmium were measured in livers of three shorebird species from Okgu Mudflat, Korea in the East Asian-Australian migration flyways. Iron concentrations in red-necked stints (Calidris ruficollis) (geomean = 1,322 microg/g dw) were higher than in terek sandpipers (Xenus cinereus) (467 microg/g dw), and great knots (Calidris tenuirostris) (158 microg/g dw). Copper concentrations in great knots (85.8 microg/g dw) were significantly higher than in red-necked stints (15.9 microg/g dw) and terek sandpipers (10.4 microg/g dw). However, significant differences in zinc concentrations were not found in livers among shorebird species. Iron, zinc, and copper concentrations from this study were within the range of other shorebird studies. We suggest that essential elements such as iron, zinc, and copper are within normal range and are maintained there by normal homeostatic mechanism. Lead and cadmium concentrations differed among shorebird species; red-necked stints (geomeans 27.8 microg/g dw and 4.69 microg/g dw, respectively) were higher than in terek sandpipers (12.9 and 0.44 microg/g dw, respectively), and great knots (5.43 and 0.29 microg/g dw, respectively). Some red-necked stints exceeded toxic levels of lead and cadmium for wild birds. In livers of red-necked stints from Okgu Mudflat, lead and cadmium concentrations were higher than previously reported in other shorebirds.
    Ecotoxicology 10/2008; 18(1):61-8. · 2.77 Impact Factor
  • Jungsoo Kim, Tae-Hoe Koo
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    ABSTRACT: This study presents concentrations of zinc, manganese, copper, lead, and cadmium in the feather of five shorebird species from Yeongjong Island, Korea in the East Asian-Australian migration flyways. The objectives of this study were to determine levels of heavy metal concentrations in the feathers of shorebirds, to evaluate the pattern of heavy metal concentrations in the feather and the liver, and to examine the correlation between heavy metal concentrations in the feathers and livers. We hypothesized that difference of heavy metal concentrations will show by the breeding ground of shorebirds. Lead concentrations in dunlins (geomean = 14.8 microg/g wet weight) and great knots (20.8 microg/g wet weight) feathers were significantly higher than Terek sandpipers (3.32 microg/g wet weight); other metals were not different among shorebirds. Zinc, lead, and cadmium concentrations in the feather were correlated with the liver concentrations, but manganese and copper concentrations were not. Zinc, manganese, copper, lead, and cadmium concentrations in the feather from this study were within the range of earlier studies for wild birds, but cadmium concentrations in dunlins were higher than other studies. Because lead concentrations in livers and feathers of the Terek sandpiper were lower than in other shorebirds, we suggest that Terek sandpipers were exposed to lower lead concentrations than Kentish plovers, dunlins, and great knots on their breeding ground.
    Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 08/2008; 55(1):122-8. · 2.01 Impact Factor
  • Jungsoo Kim, Ju-Ryul Shin, Tae-Hoe Koo
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    ABSTRACT: This study presents concentrations of heavy metals (manganese, zinc, lead, and cadmium) in tissues in six orders of Korean wild birds (n=37), 2000-2002. Zinc, manganese, lead, and cadmium concentrations in all tissues were highest in ancient murrelets (Synthliboramphus antiquus). Essential elements in Korean wild birds were within the normal range for wild birds and are maintained there by a normal homeostatic mechanism. Lead concentrations in livers of almost all birds were within the background levels. Cadmium concentrations in livers and kidneys of ancient murrelets exceeded background levels for wild birds, but other birds were within the normal range. Acute and chronic contaminations of lead and cadmium levels differed among groups (or species). We suggest that differences in lead and cadmium concentrations among groups are because of differences in diet and habitat. In ancient murrelets, zinc and manganese concentrations correlated with their cadmium concentration in livers. Zinc, manganese, and cadmium concentrations in murrelet livers were also higher than in other species. Therefore, we suggest that high zinc and manganese concentrations in ancient murrelets were related to their high cadmium concentrations.
    Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 07/2008; 56(2):317-24. · 2.01 Impact Factor
  • Jungsoo Kim, Tae-Hoe Koo
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    ABSTRACT: This study presents concentrations of iron, manganese, zinc, copper, lead, and cadmium in tissues of black-crowned night heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) (n = 8) and grey heron (Ardea cinerea) (n = 9) chicks from Pyeongtaek heronry, Gyeonggi-do, Korea, 2001. Iron (respectively, 45.8 +/- 24.0 microg/wet g, 155 +/- 123 microg/wet g), zinc (38.3 +/- 5.34 microg/wet g, 50.9 +/- 14.0 microg/wet g), and copper (9.93 +/- 2.26 microg/wet g, 30.2 +/- 12.9 microg/wet g) concentrations in feathers, manganese concentrations in livers (3.26 +/- 0.68 microg/ wet g, 1.50 +/- 0.58 microg/wet g), kidneys (1.43 +/- 0.27 microg/wet g, 0.84 +/- 0.34 microg/wet g), and bones (1.34 +/- 0.50 microg/wet g, 3.17 +/- 1.31 microg/wet g) were different between black-crowned night heron and grey heron chicks. Lead concentrations in bones (0.11 +/- 0.04 microg/wet g, 0.61 +/- 0.42 microg/wet g) and cadmium concentrations in liver (13.5 +/- 2.30 microg/wet kg, 10.3 +/- 1.59 microg/wet kg), kidney (6.61 +/- 2.54 microg/wet kg, 2.31 +/- 1.29 microg/wet kg), and muscle (5.25 +/- 5.91 microg/wet kg, 1.37 +/- 0.90 microg/wet kg) differed between chicks of the two heron species. The differences of heavy metal concentrations in tissues in herons and egrets were reported to other similar studies. Heavy metal concentrations for both heron species were at background levels. In both species, lead concentrations were higher in livers than in bones and cadmium concentrations were higher in livers than in kidneys. We suggest that it is not chronic exposure but acute exposure to lead and cadmium contamination around breeding site that leads to these observations. Therefore, lead and cadmium concentrations in tissues can be used as a bioindicator of acute local contamination.
    Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 06/2008; 54(4):740-7. · 2.01 Impact Factor
  • Jungsoo Kim, Hang Lee, Tae-Hoe Koo
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    ABSTRACT: This study presents concentrations of heavy metals (iron, zinc, manganese, copper, lead, and cadmium) in livers of three owl species from Korea. Essential trace elements (iron, zinc, manganese, and copper) did not differ among the owl species. We suggest that the essential elements are within the normal range and are maintained by normal homeostatic mechanisms. Lead and cadmium concentrations in Eurasian Eagle Owls (Bubo bubo) were significantly lower than in Brown Hawk Owls (Nixos scutulata) and Collared Scops Owls (Otus lempiji). Lead and cadmium concentrations in Korean owl species were at background levels; lead concentrations in two Collared Scops Owls were above background concentrations. Lead and cadmium concentrations were similar to concentrations previously reported in owls from other parts of the world. We suggest that lead and cadmium concentrations in Korean owls are below toxic concentrations.
    Ecotoxicology 02/2008; 17(1):21-8. · 2.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study presents concentration levels of pollutants (lead, and cadmium) in tissues (livers, kidneys, muscles, and bones) of shorebirds (Kentish Plovers (n = 5), Mongolian Plovers (n = 2), Dunlins (n = 6), Great Knots (n = 10), Terek Sandpipers (n = 10)) from Yeongjong Island, Korea in the East Asian-Australian migration flyways during the autumn migration in 1994-1995. Lead concentrations in livers, in kidneys, in muscles, and in bones were significantly different among shorebird species. Lead concentrations in livers of Kentish Plovers (4.76 +/- 2.72 microg/wet g), Mongolian Plovers (2.05 microg/wet g), Dunlins (3.77 +/- 1.07 microg/wet g), and Great Knots (4.27 +/- 3.19 microg/wet g) were less than the toxic level, and lead concentrations in livers of Terek Sandpipers (1.20 +/- 0.94 microg/wet g) were at the background level. Cadmium concentrations in livers, in kidneys, in muscles, and in bones did not vary among shorebirds, and concentrations of cadmium in livers and in kidneys were at background level (respectively, approximate 1 mug/wet g, approximate 2.67 microg/wet g) in all shorebird species. We suggest that interspecific differences of lead and cadmium concentrations were attributed to differences in exposure time and differences of diet, microhabitats in wintering ground. In livers and kidney of shorebirds from Yeongjong Island, lead and cadmium concentrations were higher than other locations previously reported.
    Environmental Monitoring and Assessment 12/2007; 134(1-3):355-61. · 1.59 Impact Factor
  • Jungsoo Kim, Tae-Hoe Koo
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    ABSTRACT: This study presents concentrations of iron, manganese, zinc, copper, lead and cadmium in diet and livers of Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax and Grey Heron Ardea cinerea chicks from Pyeongtaek, Gyeonggi-do, Korea. Heavy metal concentrations of heron chicks were not related to concentrations in the diet. Copper concentrations were significantly greater in the diet of Black-crowned Night Herons (geometric mean = 13.6 wet microg/g) than Grey Herons (7.45 wet microg/g), other metal concentrations did not differ between the diet of two species. Manganese (respectively 3.20 wet microg/g, 1.41 wet microg/g) and cadmium (respectively 13.4 wet microg/kg, 1.41 wet microg/kg) concentrations were higher in livers of Black-crowned Night Heron chicks than Grey Heron chicks, but zinc, iron, copper and lead concentrations in livers did not differ in between two herons. The essential elements were at background levels, however copper concentrations were relatively higher than previously reported from Korea. Lead and cadmium concentrations were within background levels for herons.
    Ecotoxicology 08/2007; 16(5):411-6. · 2.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study presents concentration levels of trace metals and pollutants (zinc, manganese, copper, lead, and cadmium) in tissues (livers, kidneys, muscles, and bones) of shorebirds from Yeongjong Island, Korea, in the East Asian-Australian migration flyways. Essential trace elements, zinc concentrations in kidneys, and copper concentrations in muscles significantly differed among shorebirds, but manganese concentrations did not differ in each tissue. We suggest that essential elements are within normal range and are maintained there by normal homeostatic mechanism. Lead concentrations in livers, kidneys, muscles, and bones were significantly different among shorebird species. Lead concentrations in livers of Kentish Plovers, Mongolian Plovers, Dunlins, and Great Knots were less than the toxic level, and lead concentrations in livers of Terek Sandpipers were at the background level. Cadmium concentrations in livers, kidneys, muscles, and bones did not vary among shorebirds, and concentrations of cadmium in livers and kidneys were at background level in all shorebirds. In livers of Dunlins from Yeongjong Island, lead and cadmium concentrations were higher than other locations previously reported.
    Ecotoxicology 07/2007; 16(5):403-10. · 2.77 Impact Factor
  • Jungsoo Kim, Jinhwak Chae, Tae-Hoe Koo
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    ABSTRACT: This study was carried out to find what factors could affect bird diversity in green areas in an urban landscape. We selected 83 sites of different size and type of urban landscapes in Seoul, South Korea and surveyed bird diversity. Urban green patches were grouped into three subclasses: < 1 ha, 1-10 ha and > 10 ha. The cumulative bird diversity was greater in the subclass 1-10 ha than in < 1 ha or in > 10 ha. We suggest that bird diversity was closely related to habitat size, especially in the category 1-10 ha, and recommend this area be used to establish new bird habitats in urban landscapes. The number of bird species was significantly correlated with the number of insect species in studied patches, but was not correlated with the size of green areas or the distance to roads. Therefore, we suggest that the number of insect species is the most important factor affecting bird diversity within our urban study area.
    Acta Ornithologica 06/2007; 42(1):39-44. · 1.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We studied clutch size, reproductive success and growth rate of the Little Egerts Egretta garzetta in three mixed species heronries in Pyongtaek, Korea, 2000. The mean clutch size of the Little Egrets was 3.48±0.93eggs, and the mean initial brood size was 2.65±1.90 chics, and mean final blood size was 2. 86±0.90 chicks. The initial Blood size was highly significant between clutch sizes (ANOVA,p<0.01), and final blood size was high difference not only between clutch sizes but also between initial brood sizes (ANOVA,p<0.01). Hatching success and fledging success was highly significant between clutch sizes(ANOVA,p<0.01). Growth rate between initial brood size, weight(ANOVA,p<0.05), culme length (ANOVA,p<0.01) and wing length (ANOVA,p<0.01) had significantly different. Between hatching orders per nest, culmen (ANOVA,p<0.05) and wing (t-test, p<0.05) length has significantly different in initial blood size 3 and in initial blood size2, resoectively. However, tarsus-length growth rate was not significant between hatching orders, and between initial blood sizes.
    01/2006;
  • Dong-Ha Nam, Doo-Pyo Lee, Tae-Hoe Koo
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    ABSTRACT: We investigated lead exposure conditions using unwashed feathers of feral pigeons as a monitor for lead pollution from rural, central urban, and four industrial complex areas in Korea with different ambient lead concentrations. Overall, the lead levels in the feathers increased when the atmospheric lead levels increased, so that the lead levels in the feathers from urban and industrial areas were two to four times greater than those in the rural area. However, there are no significant differences in the liver lead concentrations between rural and the other areas, suggesting that the lead originated from ingestion are not differences in locations. A positive correlation was found between the concentration of lead in livers and feathers from rural, indicating that the feather lead concentrations in this area seem to mainly reflect the internal tissue lead through the metabolic process. However, there are no significant correlations in the other areas, and we observed a relatively higher lead accumulation ratio of feathers to livers. It, therefore, indicates that external contamination onto the feather surface may be an important source for lead levels in feathers rather than transfer from internal tissue lead.
    Environmental Monitoring and Assessment 08/2004; 95(1-3):13-22. · 1.59 Impact Factor
  • Dong-Ha Nam, Doo-Pyo Lee, Tae-Hoe Koo
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    ABSTRACT: In order to understand the factors causing variation of lead and cadmium accumulation in tissues of feral pigeons in Seoul and Ansan, Korea, we investigated their age, food items (crop and gizzard contents) as well as environmental factors such as soil, atmosphere, and local traffic density. The results indicate that concentrations of Pb and Cd were highly increased in the order of eggs < chicks < adults. In food analysis, supplementary foods (rice, small stones, domestic scraps, cements, hairs, Styrofoam, etc.) could be considered as factors considering the Pb concentration differences. Concentrations of Cd in foodstuffs, the proportion of crop contents as their major foods could have an influence on the difference of Cd levels from a nutritional viewpoint. The Pb levels in gizzard contents and soil had an effect on the tissue accumulations, these were associated with the volume of vehicular traffic. However, we could not find any differences of Cd concentrations in gizzard contents and soil, although there were significantly different Cd accumulations in target organs of adult pigeons between the study areas. The Pb and Cd levels in tissues did not correspond to atmospheric metal levels.
    Environmental Monitoring and Assessment 07/2004; 95(1-3):23-35. · 1.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study was to investigate Pb and Cd concentrations in tissues of feral pigeons in urban areas. The Pb levels in bones and livers did not differ between Seoul and Kwangju areas. However, there were significant differences in kidney and liver Cd concentrations between the study sites. These are thought to be a reflection of the metal exposure conditions in the local environment. In particular, metal levels from Seoul were compared with those obtained in the same area between 1991 and 2000 in terms of the long-term biomonitoring approaches. The mean Pb concentrations in bones decreased from 59.1 g/wet g in 1991 to 29.5 g/wet g in 2000, totaling a reduction in concentrations of approximately 50 percent. However, there were no significant differences in the liver Pb concentrations. Concentrations of Cd in livers and kidneys did not differ between 1991 and 2000.
    The Korean Journal of Ecology. 01/2002; 25(6).
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    Dong-Ha Nam, Doo-Pyo Lee, Tae-Hoe Koo
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    ABSTRACT: Pb and Cd concentrations and reproductive progress of feral pigeons were investigated in urban (Seoul) and industrial complex (Ansan) areas from November 2000 to May 2001. Results of the Pb analysis for the feral pigeons from the Ansan industrial complex (egg contents: 1.13 g/wet g, bones of adult: 10.5 g/wet g) and Seoul (1.64 g/wet g, 29.5 g/wet g, respectively) indicated that the Pb level of eggs and bones of adults were significantly different between the two colonies (p
    The Korean Journal of Ecology. 01/2002; 25(6).