Yoshiko Ariji

Aichi Gakuin University, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan

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Publications (71)57.42 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Evaluating alterations in brain activity in response to pain stimulus can help understand the mechanisms underlying pain perception. We measured oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) levels using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) in order to assess prefrontal cortex activation after inducing a pain stimulus to the gingiva. Twenty-three right-handed, healthy male subjects (mean age: 29.3±3.6 years) were subjected to a mild pain stimulus to the tissue around the right maxillary central incisor. The periodontal pain stimulus (PPS) was elicited from a pocket probe, and a multi-channel fNIRS system with its accompanying 22-channel probes was used for measuring oxy-Hb levels. Mean oxy-Hb levels for each channel were calculated on the basis of values obtained at rest and during the PPS load, for 1minute each. The change in oxy-Hb level was calculated by subtracting oxy-Hb at rest from oxy-Hb levels during PPS load. Oxy-Hb levels in each channel during both conditions were then compared using the paired t-test and Bonferroni correction. Pain stimulation caused oxy-Hb levels to decrease in virtually all areas of the prefrontal cortex, particularly, in the superior frontal gyrus, the middle frontal gyrus, and the orbital part of the superior, middle, and inferior frontal gyrus, on the brain side contralateral to the pain load. This measurement could prove beneficial as an index for objective pain evaluation.
    Neuroscience letters. 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The study aimed to clarify the masseter muscle hardness in patients with myofascial pain, to examine their changes after massage, and to analyze whether the hardness can be an index for massage treatment. Sixteen patients with myofascial pain (12 with unilateral and 4 with bilateral masseter muscle pain) and 24 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. The masseter hardness between patients and the healthy volunteers was compared. The changes in the hardness in patients after massage were examined. The relation of the hardness with massage regimens and efficacies was analyzed. There was a significant right-and-left difference of the hardness in patients, although there was no difference in the healthy volunteers. The hardness decreased after massage. The pretreatment asymmetry index of the hardness showed a significant correlation with the massage pressure. It was concluded that there was a significant difference between the right and left masseter hardness in patients with myofascial pain. After massage treatment, the masseter hardness and right-and-left difference decreased. The hardness may be an index for determining the massage pressure.
    Cranio: the journal of craniomandibular practice 10/2013; 31(4):291-9. · 1.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the intramuscular changes on sonographic elastography (SE) after low-level static contraction of the masseter muscle, and to clarify the relationship with the total hardness and edematous change. Ten healthy volunteers performed sustained bilateral biting at 20% of maximal voluntary contraction for 10 min. The SE and magnetic resonance (MR) scans of the masseter muscles were performed before, immediately after, and 10 min after exercise. The masseter muscle elasticity index (MEI) ratio, muscle thickness, and intramuscular soft and hard areas distribution were evaluated on SE images. The signal to noise ratio (SNR), indicating the water content, was measured on MR images. The soft area ratio showed significant correlations with the water content expressed as SNR. The hard area ratio showed significant correlations with the total muscle hardness expressed as the MEI ratio. Intramuscular soft and hard areas could be used both clinically and experimentally.
    Oral surgery, oral medicine, oral pathology and oral radiology. 09/2013; 116(3):354-61.
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    ABSTRACT: PurposeThe purpose of this study was to investigate computed tomography (CT) and clinical features relating to calcifications within the parotid gland of patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS).Methods Data from 30 patients with SS who had been examined by CT were extracted from our radiological information database accumulated from 2001 to 2011, and their CT images were reread carefully. Of these patients, 14 (all female; age range 20–95 years; mean age 61.4 years) with calcifications within the parotid gland were retrospectively investigated with CT findings. The relationship between calcification occurrence and clinical symptoms including parotid swelling and/or saliva colic was investigated. The degree of destruction of the parotid gland on CT images was also evaluated.ResultsAll calcifications of 14 patients were located within the parotid gland, not in the parotid duct. CT images of all calcifications showed small and regular round shapes. Multiple occurrences of calcifications were recognized in 10 patients, and a solitary occurrence was seen in 4 patients. Seven patients had bilateral calcifications. There was little relationship between the occurrence of calcifications and clinical symptoms, and the severity of destruction of the parotid gland.Conclusion The presented CT and clinical features would be peculiar to SS because too many patients lacked the typical features of sialoliths within the parotid gland.
    International Journal of Oral Science 01/2013; 10(1):28–32. · 2.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to clarify the characteristic imaging features that can be used to differentiate ameloblastomas from keratocystic odontogenic tumours and to examine the significant imaging features contributing to a correct diagnosis. 60 observers (39 specialists in oral and maxillofacial radiology and 21 non-specialists) examined CT and/or panoramic images of 10 ameloblastomas and 10 keratocystic odontogenic tumours shown on a webpage and made diagnoses. Their correct answer ratios were then calculated. The imaging features of the tumours were evaluated and expressed as binary numbers or quantitative values. The imaging features that contributed to a correct diagnosis were elucidated using logistic regression analysis. The mean correct answer ratio was 61.3% ± 17.2% for the diagnosis of ameloblastomas and keratocystic odontogenic tumours. CT images produced higher correct answer ratios for diagnosis of keratocystic odontogenic tumours by specialists. The significantly different imaging features between ameloblastomas and keratocystic odontogenic tumours were the degree of bone expansion and the presence of high-density areas. The significant imaging features contributing to a correct imaging diagnosis were the number of locules, the presence of high-density areas and the inclusion of impacted teeth. The presence of high-density areas is the most useful feature in the differential diagnosis of ameloblastomas and keratocystic odontogenic tumours based on comparison of the imaging features of both tumours and examination of the diagnostic contributions of these features.
    Dentomaxillofacial Radiology 03/2011; 40(3):133-40. · 1.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to clarify the sonographic features of the masseter muscle as indices for judging the efficacy of massage treatment. Fifteen patients with temporomandibular disorder (10 with unilateral and 5 with bilateral muscle pain) underwent massage treatment alternately on the bilateral masseter and temporal muscles with an oral rehabilitation robot. Sonography was performed before and after treatment, and the masseter thickness and existence of anechoic areas were evaluated. The thickness on the symptomatic side in the unilateral group significantly decreased after treatment. Anechoic areas were shown in 20 muscles (66.7%) before treatment, and disappeared or were reduced in size in 17 muscles (85.0%) after treatment. The pretreatment thickness was significantly related to visual analog scale (VAS) scores regarding posttreatment muscle pain and massage impression. The existence of anechoic areas was relevant to VAS scores regarding muscle pain. Masseter thickness and existence of anechoic areas might be related to the therapeutic efficacy regarding muscle pain.
    Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontology 10/2010; 110(4):517-26. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to investigate factors associated with lymph node (LN) metastasis to identify which nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients can undergo a reduction in the prophylactic radiation field. MRI of biopsy-proven NPC patients was evaluated to determine primary tumour extension and the existence of LN metastasis. Sex, age, pathological type, T stage, primary tumour size, existence beyond the midline of the nasopharynx at the primary site and parapharyngeal extension of the primary tumour were assessed regarding their impact on the laterality of LN metastasis using the χ(2) test. Of the 167 patients, 149 (89%) showed nodal involvement. The existence beyond the midline of the nasopharynx was significantly associated with the laterality of LN metastasis (p<0.0001). Most patients (82%) with primary tumour presence within the midline showed only ipsilateral LN metastasis or no LN metastasis. In addition, contralateral LN metastases were seen only at Level II and the retropharyngeal LN among most of other patients. These results suggest that LN areas other than Level II and the retropharyngeal LN on the contralateral side could be omitted in patients with primary tumour presence within the midline and without the contralateral Level II or the retropharyngeal LN. Whether disease control is compromised by reducing the radiation field for subclinical diseases is a problem that should be solved in the future by prospective study.
    The British journal of radiology 10/2010; 84(999):265-70. · 2.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to clarify the changes, using magnetic resonance (MR) images, in the masseter muscles caused by low-level static contraction. Ten healthy male volunteers were enrolled in the study. The MR scans were performed before, immediately after, and 10 minutes after low-level static contraction. Two imaging sequences were acquired: a diffusion-weighted image and an iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation (IDEAL) image. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the thicknesses of the right and left masseter muscles were examined. The ADC and SNR immediately after exercise were significantly higher than those before exercise and 10 minutes after exercise. The muscles were significantly thicker immediately after exercise than before exercise and 10 minutes after exercise. We confirmed the presence of edema in the masseter muscles caused by low-level static contraction using MR images.
    Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontology 03/2010; 109(6):908-16. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: ObjectivesTo demonstrate the imaging characteristics of a patient with myoepithelial carcinoma (MEC) of the mandible accompanied by submandibular lymph node metastases, and to discuss the differential image-based diagnoses. Patients and resultsThe patient was a 57-year-old woman who had suffered from a dull pain in her left lower molar region for 3months and had an elastic-soft mass in her submandibular region for 2months. Computed tomography (CT) images showed permeative destruction of the bone trabecula and intermittent absorption of the cortical plates in the left mandible. The bone marrow of this area showed low signal intensity in a T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) image, slightly low signal intensity in a T2-weighted image, and marked contrast enhancement. A tumor was confirmed outside the buccal and lingual cortical plates. The left submandibular mass was shown as a well-defined, water-density mass by CT, low signal intensity in the T1-weighted MR image, and markedly high signal intensity in the T2-weighted image. The histopathological diagnosis was MEC of the mandible with submandibular lymph node metastasis. ConclusionsWe demonstrated the imaging characteristics of MEC, showing permeative destruction of the bone trabecula, intermittent absorption of the mandible, and cystic degeneration of the metastatic cervical lymph node. KeywordsMyoepithelial carcinoma-Jaw-Lymph node metastasis-MRI
    Oral Radiology 01/2010; 26(1):29-35. · 0.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the stiffness of the masseter muscle using sonographic elastography and to investigate its relationship with the most comfortable massage pressure in the healthy volunteers. In 16 healthy volunteers (10 men and 6 women), the Masseter Stiffness Index (MSI) was measured using EUB-7000 real-time tissue elastography. They underwent massages at three kinds of pressures using the Oral Rehabilitation Robot (WAO-1). A subjective evaluation regarding the comfort of each massage was recorded on the visual analogue scale. Elastography was also performed in two patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction with the myofascial pain. The mean MSI of the right and left muscles in the healthy volunteers were 0.85 +/- 0.44 and 0.74 +/- 0.35 respectively. There was no significant difference between the right and left MSI in the healthy volunteers. The MSI was related to massage pressure at which the healthy men felt most comfortable. The two temporomandibular disorder patients had a large laterality in the MSI. The MSI was related to the most comfortable massage pressure in the healthy men. The MSI can be one index for determining the massage pressure.
    Journal of Oral Rehabilitation 08/2009; 36(9):627-35. · 2.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is an effective tool for evaluating the results of radiotherapy. However, some false-positive appearances caused by physiological or pathological accumulation are reported. We report on three patients who showed a high accumulation of FDG in the lingual muscles but had no recurrent tumour after definitive radiotherapy for the mobile tongue. All patients had squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and received interstitial radiotherapy with small sources. High uptake was seen in the lingual muscles without recurrence or inflammation, based on physical and MR examinations. This false-positive appearance is thought to relate to ill-balanced high activity of the lingual muscles after definitive radiotherapy.
    The British journal of radiology 02/2009; 82(973):e3-7. · 2.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aims of this study were (1) to assess the diagnostic power of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for mandibular osteomyelitis through comparison with conventional techniques and (2) to establish practical MRI diagnostic criteria in relation to treatment and clinical outcome. In 55 subjects, clinically suspected as mandibular osteomyelitis, signal intensities (SI) were evaluated on T1-weighted/short T1 inversion recovery (STIR) images. Forty-seven subjects were definitively diagnosed as having osteomyelitis by pathology studies or clinical course. For the acute or subacute stage, positively associated appearances were low SI on T1-weighted image and extensive high or focal high SI on the STIR image. For chronic stage, appearances of low SI on both T1-weighted and STIR images should be added to those for the acute or subacute stage. These findings support the at-present accepted imaging diagnostic criteria based on bony changes for detection of osteomyelitis. This study confirms that T1-weighted/STIR images are useful for the detection of mandibular osteomyelitis.
    Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontology 05/2008; 105(4):503-11. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to determine the means and the ranges of the thresholds of cephalometric indexes by which orthodontists subjectively differentiate patients needing treatment for facial asymmetry from those who do not. The study was performed at the Departments of Orthodontics and Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Aichi-Gakuin University School of Dentistry in Nagoya, Japan, in 2004. Ten orthodontists subjectively evaluated the frontal photographs of 100 subjects and classified them into 2 groups. The subjects in group A showed good or clinically acceptable levels of asymmetry and did not require treatment. Those in group B showed marked asymmetry, and treatment was recommended. The frontal cephalographs were also analyzed with 5 indexes related to the mandible. For each orthodontist, the threshold was determined by means of the discriminant analysis. As the number of subjects who were judged to require treatment increased, the threshold of cephalometric indexes became smaller, and the discriminant accuracy was reduced. Among the 5 indexes evaluated, the distance of menton (mean, 4.28 mm), maxillomandibular midline angle (mean, 4.31 degrees ), and the distance of L1 (mean, 2.78 mm) showed relatively high accuracy in all observers. The distance of menton, the maxillomandibular midline angle, and the distance of L1 appeared to be relevant indexes for the subjective evaluation of facial asymmetry. The thresholds determined in this study could contribute to the planning and evaluation of orthodontic treatments.
    American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics: official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics 06/2007; 131(5):609-13. · 1.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: ObjectivesWe evaluated the clinical utility of a three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) system to assess changes in the symmetry of patients undergoing sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO) for mandibular prognathism. MethodsNine patients who underwent SSRO for mandibular prognathism were analyzed before and after their treatment using a 3D-CT system that we developed for evaluating maxillofacial skeletal asymmetry. Asymmetry indices for selected landmarks were calculated before and after treatment and compared with those of normal controls. Three regions were assessed: the maxillary, mandibular body, and mandibular ramus regions. Based on these regional assessments before and after treatment, changes in asymmetry types were determined for each patient. ResultsThe asymmetry index was frequently improved for tooth-related landmarks, whereas no changes were observed in the anterior nasal spine, orbitale, or porion. In the maxillary and mandibular body regions, all nine patients showed improvement or no change in asymmetry. Deterioration was observed only in the mandibular ramus region of three patients who had preoperative asymmetry in the maxillary region. ConclusionOur 3D-CT system is effective for postoperative evaluation of facial asymmetry in patients with mandibular prognathism.
    Oral Radiology 05/2007; 23(1):10-15. · 0.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The location and configuration of mandibular canal variations are important in surgical procedures involving the mandible, such as extraction of an impacted third molar, dental implant treatment, and sagittal split ramus osteotomy. We report 3 Japanese patients with bifid mandibular canals using panoramic radiograph and multi-slice helical computed tomography (CT) images. In 2 of the 5 sides, the bifid mandibular canal was suggested on panoramic radiograph. The bifid mandibular canal had a short and narrow upper canal toward the distal area of the second molar in 4 sides, and a short and narrow lower canal toward the distal area of second molar in 1 side, as revealed on reconstructed CT images. Since the location and configuration of mandibular canal variations are important in surgical procedures involving the mandible, they should be carefully observed using reconstructed CT images.
    Implant Dentistry 04/2007; 16(1):24-32. · 1.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To identify patients with nasopharyngeal cancer in whom the cervical radiation field can be reduced, we classified the growth patterns of nasopharyngeal cancer based on MRI findings into 4 types and performed an evaluation. Based on MRI findings, we classified the growth patterns of primary cancer in 94 patients with nasopharyngeal cancer into Type 1 (superficial type), Type 2 (lateral invasive type), Type 3 (upward invasive type), and Type 4 (anterior extension type), and further classified Type 2, based upon nasopharyngoscopic findings, into Type 2a (unilateral invasive type) and Type 2b (bilateral invasive type). The cervical lymph node metastasis areas were evaluated according to these types. Type 2 showed a significantly higher incidence of cervical lymph node metastasis only on the ipsilateral side than the other types (p = 0.0024). In particular, all patients with Type 2a had cervical lymph node metastasis only on the ipsilateral side (p = 0.0212). This study suggests that the distribution of metastasised cervical lymph nodes depends on the pattern of tumour extent of the primary site.
    The British journal of radiology 10/2006; 79(945):725-9. · 2.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aims of this study were to characterize the symmetrical features of patients with facial deformities and to suggest a classification system for facial asymmetry based on 3-dimensional-computed tomography (3D-CT) evaluation. Preoperative CT images were investigated for 49 patients with maxillofacial deformities. Asymmetry indices were calculated for some landmarks in the maxilla, mandibular body and the mandibular ramus regions. Asymmetry was observed most frequently in the mandibular body region. The subjects were divided into 3 groups. Subjects without any asymmetry in the 3 regions were classified as Group I (44.9%). Groups II or III were defined for subjects without or with maxillary region asymmetry, respectively, and they were subcategorized. In Group IIA (8.2%), asymmetry was shown solely in the mandibular body region, and in Group IIB (18.4%), additional asymmetry was shown in the mandibular ramus region. Group IIIA (6.1%) showed asymmetry only in the maxillary region, and Group IIIB (22.4%) showed asymmetry in all 3 regions. The 3D-CT classification for facial asymmetry has the potential to replace the conventional cephalometric classification.
    Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontology 10/2006; 102(3):382-90. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Condylar remodeling, which develops after mandibular setback osteotomy, was evaluated and compared in CT, plain film radiographs, and MR images acquired postoperatively. Thirty-nine patients treated with sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO) and 46 patients treated with intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy (IVRO) were studied. Remodeling as seen in the images and the diagnostic agreement between imaging modalities was evaluated. A newly formed bone layer in the posterior part of the condylar head was identified as a sign suggestive of remodeling. This sign was seen predominantly at periods over 6 months postoperatively. IVRO subjects had a higher incidence of remodeling than did the SSRO group. The diagnostic agreement between the 3 imaging modalities was substantial. There was a positive correlation between postoperative condylar displacement and the incidence of remodeling. The incidence of postoperative condylar head remodeling may be predictable. High-dose postoperative imaging studies to assess the TMJ should be restricted to those cases having a clear need for such studies.
    Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontology 05/2006; 101(4):505-14. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ultrasonography may provide some information as to the tissue characteristics of tumorous lesions in the floor of the mouth, which have not been sufficiently clarified. Ultrasonographic imaging characteristics of these lesions are presented and the differential diagnoses are discussed. Ultrasonographic images of 5 patients with metastatic lingual lymph nodes (squamous cell carcinoma), lymphangioma, Schwannoma, ranula and dermoid cyst are presented. The literature on the imaging features of tumorous lesions in the floor of the mouth was searched using Medline. Five cases of tumorous lesions in the floor of the mouth are presented. The differential diagnosis through a review of the references was discussed. Ultrasonographic images clearly showed the internal structures of the mass. The homogeneity varied according to the degree of closeness of the cells and tissues, or the presence of fluid, hemorrhage, cystic degeneration and calculus. The echogenicity was due to the high acoustic impedance of calculus, cholesterol, so on. The imaging features varied according to the ratio of the tissues, such as fat and fibrous tissue (in lipoma), or cholesterol and keratin (in dermoid cyst). A high vascular mass indicated malignant salivary gland tumors and hemangioma. In conclusion, ultrasonographic images revealed the distinctive features of the lesions and were useful for the differential diagnosis. Therefore, ultrasonography could be used to conjecture the content of the lesions and is considered to be useful for easy and accurate diagnosis prior to treatment.
    International Journal of Oral Science 05/2006; 3(1):35–44. · 2.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purposes of this study were to investigate the horizontal relationship of the roots of maxillary molars with the cortical plates and the maxillary sinus and to investigate the influence of these relationships on the spread of odontogenic infection. Computed tomography images of 120 control subjects and 49 patients with infection originating in the maxillary first or second molar were investigated. In the control group, more than 60% of the first molar roots contacted both palatal and buccal cortical plates (type A), while such contact was not seen in more than 60% of second molars. The floor of maxillary sinus was most frequently observed at the level between the bifurcation and apices of roots in both first and second molars. In patients with infection, cortical changes were more frequently seen on the buccal side than on the palatal side, and 80% of patients with buccal cortical change showed the position in which the buccal roots were close to the buccal cortical plate. Mucosal thickening of the maxillary sinus was found in 87.8%. The buccopalatal spread of odontogenic infection originating in the maxillary first and second molars was influenced by the horizontal root position in relation to the cortices.
    Clinical Oral Investigations 04/2006; 10(1):35-41. · 2.20 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

650 Citations
57.42 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1998–2014
    • Aichi Gakuin University
      • • Department of Dentistry
      • • Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology
      • • Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
      • • Department of Orthodontics
      Nagoya, Aichi, Japan
  • 2001–2009
    • Aichi Cancer Center
      Ōsaka, Ōsaka, Japan
  • 2004–2007
    • Asahi University
      Gihu, Gifu, Japan
  • 2003
    • Osaka Dental University
      Ōsaka, Ōsaka, Japan
  • 2002
    • Peking University
      • School of Stomatology
      Beijing, Beijing Shi, China
  • 1995–1997
    • Kyushu University
      • Faculty of Dental Science
      Fukuoka-shi, Fukuoka-ken, Japan