Stacey Supran

Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, United States

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Publications (22)99.22 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The object of the study was to evaluate outcomes of a randomized clinical trial (RCT) of a pharmacist intervention for depressed patients in primary care (PC). We report antidepressant (AD) use and depression severity outcomes at 6-months. The RCT was conducted between 1998 and 2000 in 9 eastern Massachusetts PC practices. We studied 533 patients with major depression and/or dysthymia as determined by a screening test done at the time of a routine PC office visit. The majority of participants had recurrent depressive episodes (63.5% with >/=4 lifetime episodes), and 49.5% were taking AD medications at enrollment. Consultation in person and by telephone was performed by a clinical pharmacist who assisted the primary care practitioner (PCP) and patient in medication choice, dose, and regimen, in accordance with AHCPR depression guidelines. Six-month AD use rates for intervention patients exceeded controls (57.5% vs. 46.2%, P =.03). Furthermore, the intervention was effective in improving AD use rates for patients not on ADs at enrollment (32.3% vs. 10.9%, P =.001). The pharmacist intervention proved equally effective in subgroups traditionally considered difficult to treat: those with chronic depression and dysthymia. Patients taking ADs had better modified Beck Depression Inventory (mBDI) outcomes than patients not taking ADs, (-6.3 points change, vs. -2.8, P =.01) but the outcome differences between intervention and control patients were not statistically significant (17.7 BDI points vs. 19.4 BDI points, P =.16). Pharmacists significantly improved rates of AD use in PC patients, especially for those not on ADs at enrollment, but outcome differences were too small to be statistically significant. Difficult-to-treat subgroups may benefit from pharmacists' care.
    General Hospital Psychiatry 05/2004; 26(3):199-209. DOI:10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2003.08.005 · 2.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this article is to provide a detailed description of interactions between patients with depression and pharmacists. Analysis was conducted on patients from the intervention arm (n=268) of an randomized controlled trial that evaluated the impact of a clinical pharmacist on the outcomes for depressed primary care patients from nine metropolitan Boston practices. The main outcome measure was the amount of intervention time spent with patients, physicians, and other activities. Details of the behavioral intervention and a categorization of the activities are offered. Pharmacists reported 978 encounters with 268 patients in 6 months. Eighty percent of patient encounters occurred by telephone. Initial encounters took 45 min if in person and 13.3 min if by telephone. Subsequent encounters followed a similar pattern. Follow-up visits occurred 2.3 times per patient. Physician contact took considerably less time. In total, the pharmacist intervention took 70.3 min per patient over 6 months; 42.2% of encounters involved an activity related to non-antidepressant medication and 85% of encounters involved general support. Other activities (education, advocating antidepressants, and motivating adherence) occurred in at least 50% of encounters. Pharmacists repeated intervention activities in the same category approximately two to three times. Interventions to improve the care of depression in primary care patients must anticipate encountering intense needs for information, personal support, and help negotiating the healthcare system. Research that identifies relationships between the components (active ingredients) of an intervention and the outcomes of care will benefit future intervention strategies and contribute to improved and efficient care.
    General Hospital Psychiatry 05/2004; 26(3):210-8. DOI:10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2004.01.004 · 2.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Skin cancer is a well-recognized long-term complication of transplantation and immunosuppression. Although risk factors for the development of skin cancer in the general population are well defined, risk factors for the development of these lesions have not been identified clearly in the liver transplant population. We surveyed 151 liver transplant (LTx) recipients for risk factors associated with cutaneous malignancies in the general population. Variables included were: demographics, primary liver disease, severity of disease at LTx, immunosuppression history, complexion, hair color, eye color, tanning profile, number of moles, occupational history, sun exposure history, sunburn history, family history of skin cancer, and any history of removed skin lesions. All skin cancers were confirmed histologically. There were 86 documented skin cancers in 34 patients: 56 squamous cell, 23 basal cell and 7 melanomas. Median follow-up was 1490 days. In a univariate analysis, age, male gender, red hair, brown eyes, primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), primary biliary cirrhosis (protective), cyclosporine, number of second degree sunburns, and frequent lifetime sun exposure were associated with the development of new skin cancers. In a multivariate model, age, male gender, red hair, brown eyes, PSC, and cyclosporine remain the strongest predictors. The incidence of skin cancer after liver transplantation is underestimated. In particular, there is a higher incidence of squamous cell carcinoma compared with the general population. Recipients with identified risk factors may be candidates for prophylactic treatment and should be followed more intensively after liver transplantation.
    Liver Transplantation 11/2002; 8(10):939-44. DOI:10.1053/jlts.2002.35551 · 3.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the effect on margin evaluation for patients with breast cancer, we prospectively quantified the "flattening" of the breast specimen after surgical removal. The volume and height of 100 consecutive breast biopsy specimens were recorded independently by the operating surgeon and the pathologist. Five factors were analyzed that were thought to contribute to changes in specimen dimensions: patient age, breast tissue density, mammographic lesion type, specimen size, and the use of compression during specimen radiography. After surgical removal, mean volume and height of the breast specimens decreased from 46 cm(3) to 29 cm(3) (30%) and from 2.6 cm to 1.4 cm (46%), respectively. Flattening of the breast specimens occurred in all subgroups studied. Breast specimens are flattened after surgical removal, losing almost 50% of their original height. This "pancake" phenomenon has important implications for the accuracy of margin analysis.
    The American Journal of Surgery 09/2002; 184(2):89-93. DOI:10.1016/S0002-9610(02)00902-9 · 2.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of cultures done with blood drawn through a central venous or arterial catheter compared with peripheral venipuncture. Retrospective cohort study of critically ill surgical patients in whom samples for paired cultures were drawn through a central venous or arterial catheter and peripheral venipuncture. Tertiary-care, university-affiliated medical center. Two hundred seventy-one patients hospitalized on a surgical and a cardiothoracic intensive care unit between November 1994 and August 1997. None. Blinded assessments of culture results done by two physicians were used as the gold standard. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were compared for culture of blood from catheters and culture of blood from peripheral venipuncture. Of 499 observations, 426 were catheter-negative/venipuncture-negative, 19 were catheter-positive/venipuncture-positive, 18 were catheter-negative/venipuncture-positive, and 36 were catheter-positive/venipuncture-negative pairs. For catheter draws compared with peripheral venipuncture, sensitivity was 78% (confidence interval [CI], 65% to 90%) and 65% (CI, 50% to 79%) (p = .2), specificity was 95% (CI, 94% to 97%) and 98% (CI, 97% to 99%) (p = .002), positive predictive value was 63% (CI, 51% to 76%) and 78% (CI, 64% to 91%) (p = .1) and negative predictive value was 98% (CI, 96% to 99%) and 97% (CI, 95% to 98%) (p = .3). When central venous specimens as differentiated from arterial catheter specimens were compared with peripheral venipuncture, the difference between positive predictive values reached statistical significance (61% and 82%; p = .04). In critically ill surgical patients, cultures of blood drawn through a catheter are less specific than those obtained from a peripheral venipuncture. Both types of cultures have an excellent negative predictive value. Positive predictive value of cultures of blood drawn through a catheter is low and, when obtained from a central line, statistically less than from a peripheral venipuncture. Additional cultures seem to be necessary for the proper interpretation of a positive culture drawn through a catheter in critical care patients.
    Critical Care Medicine 02/2002; 30(1):7-13. DOI:10.1097/00003246-200201000-00002 · 6.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To explore the possible interaction between human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) in patients who have undergone organ transplantation, stored serum samples from 139 orthotopic liver transplant recipients were tested for HHV-6 immunoglobulin (Ig) G and IgM antibodies. HHV-6 reactivation occurred in 87 patients (62.6%) and was associated with CMV disease (P=.01), severe CMV-associated disease (P=.01), older age (P=.005), and use of muromonab-CD3 (Orthoclone; Orthobiotech) as treatment for rejection (P=.02). Trends for an association between HHV-6 reactivation and invasive fungal disease (P=.12), bacteremia (P=.10), and graft loss (P=.12) were seen. In a multivariate analysis of risk factors for severe CMV-associated disease, HHV-6 reactivation (relative risk [RR], 3.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-10.2; P=.02), CMV donor-positive-recipient-negative match (RR, 5.7; 95% CI, 2.5-13.2; P<.001), and elevated serum creatinine level (P<.0001) were independent predictors. HHV-6 reactivation is associated with severe CMV-associated disease in liver transplant recipients.
    Clinical Infectious Diseases 10/2001; 33(8):1358-62. DOI:10.1086/323336 · 9.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) is thought to cause changes in mood among patients using it for contraception. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in negative and positive affect among adolescent females using DMPA as a contraceptive agent. This prospective study was set in an urban hospital adolescent clinic. Thirty-nine adolescents choosing DMPA as a contraceptive agent and 24 adolescents not using any hormonal contraception were enrolled as subjects and controls, respectively. Two standardized questionnaires, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Multiple Affect Adjective Checklist-Revised (MAACL-R), were administered at baseline to all participants and readministered at 3, 6, and 12 months. Changes in negative affect from baseline to 3, 6, and 12 months were evaluated by the BDI and by "dysphoria" subscale scores of the MAACL-R. Paired t-tests were used to measure these changes in subjects and controls separately. The mean change in BDI scores from baseline to one year for those who completed one year was -4.8 for subjects (P =.02) and +.3 (P =.84) for controls. The mean change in the dysphoria subscale scores was -5.7 (P =.21) for the subjects and -.1 (P =.98) for the controls while the change in the positive affect scores over a period of one year were -2.1 (P =.46) and +.1 (P =.98) for subjects and controls, respectively. Adolescents using DMPA do not show depressive symptoms when using DMPA as a contraceptive agent over a period of 12 months as measured by the BDI and show no significant changes in negative or positive affect as measured by the MAACL-R.
    Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology 06/2001; 14(2):71-6. DOI:10.1016/S1083-3188(01)00074-2 · 1.81 Impact Factor
  • Transplantation Proceedings 02/2001; 33(1-2):827-8. DOI:10.1016/S0041-1345(00)02333-2 · 0.95 Impact Factor
  • Transplantation Proceedings 02/2001; 33(1-2):1436-7. DOI:10.1016/S0041-1345(00)02543-4 · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The current study was conducted to review the authors' experience in treating consecutive patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer (1997 revision) Stage III nonsmall cell lung carcinoma with aggressive preoperative chemoradiation followed by surgical resection. The records of all patients who received preoperative chemoradiation were evaluated. Patients received 2 cycles of concurrent cisplatin and etoposide with 5940 centigrays of radiation therapy. They then were reevaluated to determine whether they were surgical candidates. If so, resection of the primary tumor with mediastinal lymph node dissection was performed 4-6 weeks after the completion of preoperative treatment. After adequate healing, an additional four cycles of cisplatin/etoposide or carboplatin/paclitaxel was given. Forty-two patients received preoperative chemoradiation, 33 of whom underwent surgical resection (79%), including 9 patients who underwent pneumonectomies. Complete pathologic responses were observed in 27% of these patients. Postoperative complications were noted in 21% of the patients and included persistent air leak, supraventricular arrhythmia, and empyema. There were no reported treatment-related deaths. The median follow-up was 26 months. The overall 5-year survival rate for all patients was 36.5% and was 45. 3% for patients who underwent resection. A trend toward increased 5-year survival was observed in patients who had a complete pathologic response (57.1%). Univariate analysis revealed the N stage classification to be significant for predicting a complete response. Patterns of failure revealed the brain to be the most common site of first recurrence (50%) and the only site of recurrence in 36% of patients. There was only one case of local failure. Preoperative chemoradiation using high radiation doses is feasible with acceptable toxicity. The results of the current study suggest an increased complete pathologic response rate and increased overall survival rate compared with reports in the published literature.
    Cancer 12/2000; 89(9):1946-52. · 4.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The in vitro antibacterial activities of clinafloxacin, trovafloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and cefoxitin against 1,000 clinical isolates of Bacteroides fragilis group were compared by agar dilution in brucella blood agar (BBA) and Wilkins Chalgren agar (WCA). Significantly higher geometric mean MICs for the three quinolones and cefoxitin (P<0.001) were obtained in BBA than in WCA. Regardless of medium, clinafloxacin was slightly more active than trovafloxacin. The activity of clinafloxacin and trovafloxacin was greater than that of cefoxitin against B. distasonis, B. ovatus, and B. thetaiotaomicron but lower against B. vulgatus. High cross resistance between trovafloxacin and clinafloxacin was observed.
    Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 07/2000; 44(6):1710-2. DOI:10.1128/AAC.44.6.1710-1712.2000 · 4.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nonimmunosuppressed individuals possessing a NcoI restriction enzyme site in the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) gene locus produce less TNF-alpha in vitro and in vivo than do individuals lacking this site. We have previously shown that this NcoI+/low TNF-alpha genotype is independently associated with increased rates of infection for liver transplant recipients. In this study, we performed polymerase chain reaction amplification and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the TNF locus from 45 renal transplant recipients to determine whether the presence of the NcoI site is associated with the frequency of rejection, infection, time to rejection or infection, and patient or graft survival. Twenty-six recipients were typed with the NcoI+/low TNF-alpha genotype, whereas 19 recipients had the NcoI-/high TNF-alpha genotype. Age, sex, donor type, secondary immunosuppression, use of anti-lymphocyte preparations, graft ischemia time, and year of transplant were evenly distributed in the two groups. There was no difference between the genotype groups in the rate of, or time to, rejection. In contrast, significantly more patients with the NcoI+/low TNF-alpha site developed infections (46% vs. 10% P=0.01). In bivari able models, each controlling for donor type, ischemia time, recipient age, use of antilymphocyte agents, and secondary immunosuppression, the NcoI+/low TNF-alpha genotype was still independently associated with increased numbers of infections (relative risk, 5.38; confidence interval, 1.20-23.8). Conclusion. We conclude that in individuals genetically predetermined to be low TNF-alpha producers, the additional inhibition of TNF-alpha production by routine immunosuppression may be excessive, rendering these individuals less able to respond to infectious stimuli. These patients may benefit from lower doses or withdrawal of corticosteroids, which are known inhibitors of TNF-alpha transcription.
    Transplantation 04/2000; 69(5):880-4. DOI:10.1097/00007890-199905150-00045 · 3.78 Impact Factor
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    Transplantation 01/2000; 70(9):880-884. DOI:10.1097/00007890-200003150-00036 · 3.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Antimicrobial resistance, including plasmid-mediated resistance, among the species of the Bacteroides fragilis group is well documented. An analysis of the in vitro susceptibility of B. fragilis group species referred between 1995 and 1996 as well as during a 7-year (1990 to 1996), prospective, multicenter survey of over 4,000 clinical isolates of B. fragilis group species was undertaken to review trends in the percent resistance to and geometric mean MICs of the antibiotics tested. There was a trend toward a decrease in the geometric mean MICs of most beta-lactam antibiotics, while the percent resistance to most agents was less affected. Within the species B. fragilis, the geometric mean MICs showed significant (P < 0.05) decreases for piperacillin-tazobactam, ticarcillin-clavulanate, piperacillin, ticarcillin, ceftizoxime, cefotetan, and cefmetazole; a significant increase was observed for clindamycin and cefoxitin. For the non-B. fragilis species, a significant decrease in the geometric mean MICs was observed for meropenem, ampicillin-sulbactam, ticarcillin-clavulanate, piperacillin, ticarcillin, ceftizoxime, and cefmetazole; a significant increase was observed for cefoxitin. Significant increases in percent resistance were observed within the B. fragilis strains for ticarcillin and ceftizoxime and within the non-B. fragilis isolates for cefotetan. Significant increases in percent resistance among all B. fragilis group species were observed for clindamycin, while imipenem showed no significant change in resistance trends. The trend analysis for trovafloxacin was limited to 3 years, since the quinolone was tested only in 1994, 1995, and 1996. During the 7 years analyzed, there was no resistance to metronidazole or chloramphenicol observed. The data demonstrate that resistance among the B. fragilis group species has decreased in the past several years, the major exception being clindamycin. The majority of the resistance decrease has been for the beta-lactams in B. fragilis, compared to other species. The reasons for these changes are not readily apparent.
    Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 11/1999; 43(10):2417-22. · 4.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background. Transplantation of organs from donors who are bacteremic is controversial. We examined the outcome of recipients of solid organs from donors with bacteremia and/or fungemia at the time of organ recovery. Methods. All organ donors from a single organ procurement organization between January 1990 and December 1996 were retrospectively analyzed. We calculated rates of transmission from bacteremic or fungemic donors to their recipients and compared the graft and patient survival rates for recipients of these organs with those for recipients of organs from nonbacteremic donors. Results. There were 95 (5.1%) bacteremic donors from a total of 1775, from whom 212 recipients received organs. Forty-six (48%) of the bacteremic donors had pathogens in their blood. Among the 101 recipients of organs from these, no evidence of transmission could be documented. (0% transmission rate, 95% CI 0-3). The remaining 49 donors had either Staphylococcus epidermidis or other unlikely pathogens recovered from the blood. Examination of the 111 recipients of organs from these donors also found no evidence for transmission (0% transmission rate, 95% CI 0-3). Of the 212 recipients, 193 (91%) received a mean of 3.8±2.5 days of antibiotics postoperatively. The 30-day graft and patient survival for recipients of organs from bacteremic donors was not significantly different from recipients of organs from nonbacteremic donors (P=0.695 for patient survival, and P=0.310 for graft survival). Conclusions. Organs transplanted from bacteremic donors do not transmit bacterial infection or result in poorer outcomes. Use of organs from these donors could help increase organ availability.
    Transplantation 10/1999; 68(8):1107-1111. DOI:10.1097/00007890-199910270-00008 · 3.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is a pro-inflammatory mediator of the immune response to allogenic and infectious stimuli. Non-immunosuppressed individuals possessing a NcoI restriction enzyme site in the TNF gene locus produce less TNF-alpha in vitro and in vivo compared with individuals lacking this restriction site. We performed polymerase chain reaction amplification and restriction enzyme fragment length analysis of the TNF locus from 86 liver transplant recipients to determine if presence of the NcoI site is associated with the frequency of rejection or infection, time to rejection or infection, and patient and graft survival. We controlled for recipient primary diagnosis, age, sex, United Network for Organ Sharing status, year of transplant, type of immunosuppression, use of anti-lymphocyte agents, and graft ischemia time. Fifty-six recipients possessed the NcoI+/low TNF-alpha genotype and 30 were NcoI-/high TNF-alpha genotype. In the first year after transplant, there were no significant differences in the frequency, or time to first rejections or the overall number of rejection episodes between the two genotypes. NcoI+/low TNF-alpha genotype recipients had significantly more infections (1.52 vs. 0.87, P=0.014). In a linear regression, multivariate model controlling for all marginally significant variables, the NcoI+/low TNF-alpha genotype was still associated with significantly more infections (P=0.0031). Patient and graft survival were equal for the two groups. One implication of this study, in individuals genetically predetermined to be low TNF-alpha producers, is that additional inhibition of TNF-alpha production by routine immunosuppression may be excessive, rendering these individuals less able to respond to infectious stimuli. These patients may benefit from lower doses or withdrawal of corticosteroids.
    Transplantation 05/1999; 67(7):1005-10. · 3.78 Impact Factor
  • Transplantation 04/1999; 67(7). DOI:10.1097/00007890-199904150-00762 · 3.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a pro-inflammatory mediator of the immune response to allogenic and infectious stimuli. Non-immunosuppressed individuals possessing a NcoI restriction enzyme site in the TNF gene locus produce less TNF-α in vitro and in vivo compared with individuals lacking this restriction site. We performed polymerase chain reaction amplification and restriction enzyme fragment length analysis of the TNF locus from 86 liver transplant recipients to determine if presence of the NcoI site is associated with the frequency of rejection or infection, time to rejection or infection, and patient and graft survival. We controlled for recipient primary diagnosis, age, sex, United Network for Organ Sharing status, year of transplant, type of immunosuppression, use of anti-lymphocyte agents, and graft ischemia time. Fifty-six recipients possessed the NcoI+/low TNF-α genotype and 30 were NcoI-/high TNF-α genotype. In the first year after transplant, there were no significant differences in the frequency, or time to first rejections or the overall number of rejection episodes between the two genotypes. NcoI+/low TNF-α genotype recipients had significantly more infections (1.52 vs. 0.87, P=0.014). In a linear regression, multivariate model controlling for all marginally significant variables, the NcoI+/low TNF-α genotype was still associated with significantly more infections (P=0.0031). Patient and graft survival were equal for the two groups. One implication of this study, in individuals genetically predetermined to be low TNF-α producers, is that additional inhibition of TNF-α production by routine immunosuppression may be excessive, rendering these individuals less able to respond to infectious stimuli. These patients may benefit from lower doses or with-drawal of corticosteroids.
    Transplantation 04/1999; 67(7):1005-1010. DOI:10.1097/00007890-199904150-00012 · 3.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Infections remain common life-threatening complications of bone marrow transplantation. To examine clinical factors that affect infection risk, we retrospectively studied patients who received bone marrow transplants (53 autologous and 51 allogeneic). Over a median of 27 hospital days, 44 patients developed documented infections. Both autologous transplantation and hematopoietic growth factor use were associated with less prolonged neutropenia and decreased occurrence of infection (P < or = .05). In a survival regression model, variables independently associated with infection risk were the log10 of the neutrophil count (hazard ratio [HR], 0.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.32-0.75), ciprofloxacin prophylaxis (HR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.19-0.95), empirical intravenous antibiotic use (HR, 0.09; 95% CI, 0.03-0.32), and an interaction between neutrophil count and intravenous antibiotic use (HR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.06-3.29). In this model, infection risk increases steeply at low neutrophil counts for patients receiving no antibiotic therapy. Ciprofloxacin prophylaxis and particularly intravenous antibiotic therapy provide substantial protection at low neutrophil counts. These results can be used to model management strategies for transplant recipients.
    Clinical Infectious Diseases 03/1999; 28(2):256-66. DOI:10.1086/515103 · 9.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A potential association between human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) following kidney transplantation was explored by retrospectively testing serial serum specimens for HHV-6 IgG and IgM antibody. HHV-6 reactivation occurred in 35 (66%) of 53 transplant recipients. Fungal or parasitic opportunistic infections, graft rejection or loss, and mortality were not associated with HHV-6 reactivation. HHV-6 reactivation was associated with primary CMV infection (P=.001) and CMV syndrome (P=.003) and with trends for CMV-related hepatitis (P=.095), CMV-related neutropenia (P=.104), and serious CMV disease (P=.085). After controlling for CMV immune globulin (CMVIG) prophylaxis, the association between HHV-6 reactivation and primary CMV infection and syndrome remained significant (P=.002 and 0.006, respectively). The reduction in CMV syndrome among those receiving CMVIG prophylaxis remained significant (P=.007) after controlling for HHV-6 reactivation. HHV-6 reactivation in kidney transplant recipients at risk for primary CMV infection is associated with CMV infection and CMV-related disease, and these effects are independent of CMVIG prophylaxis.
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases 01/1999; 178(6):1783-6. DOI:10.1086/314510 · 5.78 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

751 Citations
99.22 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2000–2004
    • Tufts Medical Center
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Division of Geographic Medicine and Infectious Diseases
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2002
    • New England Baptist Hospital
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1998–2001
    • Tufts University
      • Division of Cardiology
      Georgia, United States
  • 1999
    • Danbury Hospital
      Danbury, Connecticut, United States