Ericson Bagatin

University of Campinas, Conceição de Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil

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Publications (38)42.97 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Subjects exposed to laboratory animals are at a heightened risk of developing respiratory and allergic diseases. These diseases can be prevented by simple measures such as the use of personal protective equipment. We report here the primary findings of the Laboratory Animals and Respiratory Allergies Study regarding the prevalence of allergic diseases among laboratory animal workers, the routine use of preventive measures in laboratories and animal facilities, and the need for prevention programs. Animal handlers and non-animal handlers from 2 Brazilian universities (University of São Paulo and State University of Campinas) answered specific questionnaires to assess work conditions and symptoms. These subjects also underwent spirometry, a bronchial challenge test with mannitol, and skin prick tests for 11 common allergens and 5 occupational allergens (rat, mouse, guinea pig, hamster, and rabbit). Four hundred fifty-five animal handlers (32±10 years old [mean±SD], 209 men) and 387 non-animal handlers (33±11 years old, 121 men) were evaluated. Sensitization to occupational allergens was higher among animal handlers (16%) than non-animal handlers (3%, p<0.01). Accessibility to personal protective equipment was measured at 85% (median, considering 73 workplaces of the animal handler group). Nineteen percent of the animal handlers indicated that they wear a respirator at all times while handling animals or working in the animal room, and only 25% of the animal handlers had received an orientation about animal-induced allergies, asthma, or rhinitis. In conclusion, our data indicate that preventive programs are necessary. We suggest providing individual advice to workers associated with institutional programs to promote a safer work environment.
    Clinics (São Paulo, Brazil) 06/2013; 68(6). · 1.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Exposure to silica dust has been examined as a possible risk factor for autoimmune diseases, including systemic sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and ANCA-associated vasculitis. However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms resulting in the increased prevalence of autoimmunity remain elusive. To clarify these mechanisms, we studied various markers of immune activation in individuals occupationally exposed to silica dust, i.e., serum levels of soluble IL-2 receptor (sIL-2R), levels of IL-2, other pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and lymphoproliferation. Our results demonstrate that silica-exposed individuals present important alterations in their immune response when compared to controls, as shown by increased serum sIL-2R levels, decreased production of IL-2 and increased levels of the pro-inflammatory (IFN-γ, IL-1α, TNF-α, IL-6) as well as anti-inflammatory (IL-10 and TGF-β) cytokines. Furthermore, silica-exposed individuals presented enhanced lymphoproliferative responses. Our findings provide evidence that the maintenance of immune homeostasis may be disturbed in silica-exposed individuals, possibly resulting in autoimmune disorders.
    International journal of hygiene and environmental health 01/2013; · 2.64 Impact Factor
  • American Thoracic Society 2012 International Conference, May 18-23, 2012 • San Francisco, California; 05/2012
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    ABSTRACT: Exposure to silica dust has been examined as a possible risk factor for autoimmune diseases, including scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Since CTLA-4 [CD152] and PD-1 [CD279] are important for the maintenance of peripheral tolerance by regulating T cell responsiveness, we evaluated the expression of these molecules on the surface of CD4 and CD8 T cells, as well as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in CTLA-4 and PDCD1 genes, of 70 silica-exposed workers and 30 non-exposed, age-, ethnically- and sex-matched controls. Expression of CTLA-4 was significantly (P<0.05) reduced in CD4 T cells of exposed individuals [median=0.1% and interquartile range, IQR 0.0-0.1% (exposed), median=0.20%, IQR 0.0-0.4% (control)]. Also the expression of PD-1 was significantly (P<0.0001) reduced in both CD4 [median=0.9%, IQR 0.4-2.3% (exposed), median=5.7%, IQR 1.4-13.3% (control)] and CD8 T cells [median=0.9%, IQR 0.3-1.9% (exposed), median=5.0%, IQR 3.4-8.9% (control)]. The study of polymorphisms demonstrated a lower frequency of the A allele in the analysis of the PD1.3 SNP in the exposed group, which might be associated with the lower expression of PD-1 on the surface of CD4 T cells. Our findings provide evidence for the association of silica exposure and the maintenance of self-tolerance, i.e., the susceptibility to autoimmune disorders.
    International journal of hygiene and environmental health 12/2011; 215(6):562-9. · 2.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pulmonary function tests (PFT), particularly spirometry and lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DL(CO) ), have been considered useful methods for the detection of the progression of interstitial asbestos abnormalities as indicated by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). However, it is currently unknown which of these two tests correlates best with anatomical changes over time. In this study, we contrasted longitudinal changes (3-9 years follow-up) in PFTs at rest and during exercise with interstitial abnormalities evaluated by HRCT in 63 ex-workers with mild-to-moderate asbestosis. At baseline, patients presented with low-grade asbestosis (Huuskonen classes I-II), and most PFT results were within the limits of normality. In the follow-up, most subjects had normal spirometry, static lung volumes and arterial blood gases. In contrast, frequency of DL(CO) abnormalities almost doubled (P < 0.05). Twenty-three (36.5%) subjects increased the interstitial marks on HRCT. These had significantly larger declines in DL(CO) compared to patients who remained stable (0.88 vs. 0.31 ml/min/mm Hg/year and 3.5 vs. 1.2%/year, respectively; P < 0.05). In contrast, no between-group differences were found for the other functional tests, including spirometry (P > 0.05). These data demonstrate that the functional consequences of progression of HRCT abnormalities in mild-to-moderate asbestosis are better reflected by decrements in DL(CO) than by spirometric changes. These results might have important practical implications for medico-legal evaluation of this patient population.
    American Journal of Industrial Medicine 03/2011; 54(3):185-93. · 1.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the changes over time in the pattern and extent of parenchymal abnormalities in asbestos-exposed workers after cessation of exposure and to compare 3 proposed semiquantitative methods with a careful side-by-side comparison of the initial and the follow-up computed tomography (CT) images. The study included 52 male asbestos workers (mean age+/-SD, 62.2 y+/-8.2) who had baseline high-resolution CT after cessation of exposure and follow-up CT 3 to 5 years later. Two independent thoracic radiologists quantified the findings according to the scoring systems proposed by Huuskonen, Gamsu, and Sette and then did a side-by-side comparison of the 2 sets of scans without awareness of the dates of the CT scans. There was no difference in the prevalence of the 2 most common parenchymal abnormalities (centrilobular small dotlike or branching opacities and interstitial lines) between the initial and follow-up CT scans. Honeycombing (20%) and traction bronchiectasis and bronchiolectasis (50%) were seen more commonly on the follow-up CT than on the initial examination (10% and 33%, respectively) (P=0.01). Increased extent of parenchymal abnormalities was evident on side-by-side comparison in 42 (81%) patients but resulted in an increase in score in at least 1 semiquantitative system in only 16 (31%) patients (all P>0.01, signed test). The majority of patients with previous asbestos exposure show evidence of progression of disease on CT at 3 to 5 years follow-up but this progression is usually not detected by the 3 proposed semiquantitative scoring schemes.
    Journal of thoracic imaging 12/2008; 23(4):251-7. · 1.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To develop and consolidate a comprehensive database on the occurrence of pneumoconioses in an industrialized region of Brazil, with a special focus on the activities most frequently related to these diseases. A retrospective, observational study was conducted in order to gather data on cases of pneumoconioses treated at the outpatient clinic of the State University at Campinas Hospital das Clínicas between 1978 and 2003. Individuals diagnosed with pneumoconiosis, based on their occupational history and on chest X-ray findings of abnormalities consistent with interstitial lung disease involving the parenchyma, in accordance with the 1980 and 2000 recommendations of the International Labour Organization, were included in the study. A total of 1147 cases of pneumoconiosis were identified (1075 in males and 72 in females): 1061 cases of silicosis (92.5%); 51 cases of mixed-dust pneumoconiosis (4.45%); 15 cases of asbestosis (1.31%); 13 cases of phosphate rock-related pneumoconiosis (1.13%); and 7 cases of other types of pneumoconiosis (0.6%), including those related to exposure to coal, graphite and hard metals. The most common chest X-ray findings were 1/0, 1/1 or 1/2 profusion and small regular opacities (p, q or r), although 192 patients (16.74%) presented large opacities. There has been a substantial decline in the occurrence of the disease since the 1990s, and the duration of exposure was typically shorter than that observed in a study conducted in the United States. Our findings have been compiled into a comprehensive database for the investigation of pneumoconiosis in an industrialized area of Brazil. These data make it possible to conduct follow-up studies and develop health policies related to occupational respiratory disorders.
    Jornal brasileiro de pneumologia: publicacao oficial da Sociedade Brasileira de Pneumologia e Tisilogia 07/2008; 34(6):367-72.
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    ABSTRACT: Asbestosis is associated with lung cellular and immunological abnormalities. Induced sputum cytology and local and systemic markers of inflammation may be helpful to characterize disease status and progression in these patients. Thirty-nine ex-workers with asbestosis on high-resolution CT (HRCT) and 21 non-exposed controls were evaluated. Sputum cytology and IL-8 in serum and sputum were related to lung function impairment. Subjects with asbestosis had reduced sputum cellularity but higher macrophage/neutrophil ratio and % macrophage as compared with controls. Sputum and serum IL-8 were also higher in patients with asbestosis (P < 0.05). In addition, evidence of lung architectural distorption on HRCT was associated with increased levels of serum IL-8. Interestingly, absolute macrophage number was negatively correlated with total lung capacity (r = -0.40; P = 0.04) and serum IL-8 to lung diffusing capacity (r = -0.45; P = 0.01). Occupationally exposed subjects with asbestosis on HRCT have cytologic abnormalities in induced sputum and increased local and systemic pro-inflammatory status which are correlated to functional impairment.
    American Journal of Industrial Medicine 04/2008; 51(3):186-94. · 1.59 Impact Factor
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    M R Becklake, E Bagatin, J A Neder
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    ABSTRACT: Asbestos is a descriptive term for a group of naturally occurring minerals known to mankind since ancient times. The main types of asbestos (chrysotile, and the amphiboles crocidolite and amosite) differ in chemical structure, biopersistence in human tissue and toxicity. Commercial exploitation, with little thought for environmental controls, increased over the twentieth century, particularly after World War II, to accommodate globalisation and the demands of the world's burgeoning cities. As its ill-health effects, both non-malignant (fibrosis of the lungs or asbestosis; pleural effusion, plaques and thickening) and malignant (mesothelioma, lung and other cancers), became evident, public pressure rose to control its use. The last decades of the last century saw decreases in exposure and rates of asbestosis in industrialised and in some less-industrialised countries, where pleural plaques and malignant mesothelioma are currently the most frequent manifestations of asbestos exposure. Longer follow-up of asbestos-exposed cohorts in mining and manufacturing has also strengthened the evidence of a fibre gradient in toxicity, with chrysotile exhibiting lower toxicity than the amphiboles, and amosite lower toxicity than crocidolite. The last decades of the twentieth century saw stabilisation and/or declines in mesothelioma rates in several industrialised countries. In less-industrialised countries, data on disease are sparse, exposure generally high and rates may peak in the future. Management of asbestos-related disease in the workplace requires collaboration between workers and unions (responsible for monitoring workplace dust levels, to which they must have access) and companies (responsible for engineering controls), reinforced by appropriate government regulations and by community support.
    The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 04/2007; 11(4):356-69. · 2.76 Impact Factor
  • M.R. Becklake, E. Bagatin, J.A. Neder
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    ABSTRACT: Asbestos is a descriptive term for a group of naturally occurring minerals known to mankind since ancient times. The main types of asbestos (chrysotile, and the amphiboles crocidolite and amosite) differ in chemical structure, biopersistence in human tissue and toxicity. Commercial exploitation, with little thought for environmental controls, increased over the twentieth century, particularly after World War II, to accommodate globalisation and the demands of the world's burgeoning cities. As its ill-health effects, both non-malignant (fibrosis of the lungs or asbestosis; pleural effusion, plaques and thickening) and malignant (mesothelioma, lung and other cancers), became evident, public pressure rose to control its use. The last decades of the last century saw decreases in exposure and rates of asbestosis in industrialised and in some less-industrialised countries, where pleural plaques and malignant mesothelioma are currently the most frequent manifestations of asbestos exposure. Longer follow-up of asbestos-exposed cohorts in mining and manufacturing has also strengthened the evidence of a fibre gradient in toxicity, with chrysotile exhibiting lower toxicity than the amphiboles, and amosite lower toxicity than crocidolite. The last decades of the twentieth century saw stabilisation and/or declines in mesothelioma rates in several industrialised countries. In less-industrialised countries, data on disease are sparse, exposure generally high and rates may peak in the future. Management of asbestos-related disease in the workplace requires collaboration between workers and unions (responsible for monitoring workplace dust levels, to which they must have access) and companies (responsible for engineering controls), reinforced by appropriate government regulations and by community support.
    The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 03/2007; 11(3 in the series]" class="no-underline contain" target="_blank">PDF 361.9kb):356-369. · 2.76 Impact Factor
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    Ericson Bagatin, José Alberto Neder
    Jornal Brasileiro de Pneumologia 05/2006; 32. · 1.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the reproducibility of a new high-resolution computed tomography (CT) visual semiquantitative method for pleural plaques in asbestos-exposed workers. We performed thin-section CT in 752 chrysotile asbestos mining workers and ex-workers. Institutional review board approval and signed written informed consent from subjects were obtained. Two readers independently evaluated the 752 CT scans and identified 57 workers (mean age +/- SD, 61.8 years +/- 8.1; range, 37 to 81 years) who had pleural plaques and no other pleural or parenchymal abnormality. Three independent radiologists then quantified the plaque burden in these 57 workers using a scoring system based on the evaluation of the maximum thickness of parietal pleural plaques and percentage of parietal pleural surface involvement. We also calculated the proportion between the number of CT slices with diaphragmatic plaques and the total number of slices in which the diaphragm was seen (pdiaph). The intraobserver and interobserver agreements were analyzed using weighted Kappa coefficient. Interobserver agreements were good for the pleural plaque score (k = 0.61, 0.75, and 0.79) and ranged from good (k = 0.61) to excellent (k = 0.86) for the pdiaph. Intraobserver agreements ranged from good to excellent for the pleural plaque score (k = 0.79 and 1.00) and for the pdiaph (k = 0.79 and 0.93). The method proposed for high-resolution CT pleural plaque quantification in asbestos-exposed workers has a high reproducibility.
    Journal of Thoracic Imaging 04/2006; 21(1):8-13. · 1.49 Impact Factor
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    Ericson Bagatin, Everardo Andrade da Costa
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    ABSTRACT: A great number of agents found in inhaled air, whether in the environment or in the workplace, can cause symptoms and diseases of the upper respiratory tract. Unfortunately, establishing the cause-and-effect relationship between exposure to one of the various types of agents that can provoke such diseases and the diseases themselves is not routine practice among the health professionals involved. A comprehensive list of these agents and their relationships with the effects and onset of such illnesses is available in the literature. Chief among these ills are rhinosinusitis, dysphonia and ulceration/perforation of the nasal septum, as well as tumors in the nasal cavity or paranasal sinuses, all of which can be work related. Although widely available, diagnostic procedures for the investigation of occupational etiology are not yet routinely employed. In general, early identification of, and discontinuation of the contact with, the causal agent can resolve the problem, thereby averting the development of the chronic form of the disease. As with other types of occupational respiratory diseases, prevention and control programs are indispensable in the fight against these illnesses.
    Jornal brasileiro de pneumologia: publicacao oficial da Sociedade Brasileira de Pneumologia e Tisilogia 02/2006; 32 Suppl 2:S17-26.
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    ABSTRACT: Occupational chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, despite having been widely discussed for nearly half a century, is still rarely addressed in Brazil. Various studies, especially those that were population-based, have revealed the relationship between occupational exposure to aerosols and impairment of the airways. This chapter aims to remind physicians of the diagnosis of occupational chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by presenting a succinct review of the literature on the theme, which should be incorporated into the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, in terms of the scope of the diagnostic basis as well as in terms of the questionnaire specific for the disease. Collecting detailed work histories and characterizing exposure to inhaled agents known to have deleterious effects on the respiratory system will surely result in improved approaches to making diagnoses and prognoses of this disease, as well as contributing to its greater control.
    Jornal brasileiro de pneumologia: publicacao oficial da Sociedade Brasileira de Pneumologia e Tisilogia 02/2006; 32 Suppl 2:S35-40.
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    Ericson Bagatin, Satoshi Kitamura
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    ABSTRACT: Just as a complete patient history is fundamental to making any diagnosis, the history of environmental exposure in the workplace forms the informational base needed in order to understand occupational respiratory diseases. It is estimated that 20% of all cases of interstitial or airway disease are related to such exposure. However, information regarding potential environmental exposure is rarely included in the patient history, nor is job/occupation/function taken into consideration. Therefore, this theme has become pivotal to the discussion among health care professionals working in this area, who must decide whether evaluating and estimating the magnitude of this problem are truly desirable goals.
    Jornal brasileiro de pneumologia: publicacao oficial da Sociedade Brasileira de Pneumologia e Tisilogia 02/2006; 32 Suppl 2:S12-6.
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    ABSTRACT: A variety of diseases are encompassed in the didactic denomination of "granulomatous diseases of probable occupational etiology". As well as presenting similar clinical aspects, such diseases are characterized by certain common traits: formation of granulomas; systemic and respiratory manifestations; environmental or occupational exposure to organic or inorganic agents; and T lymphocyte involvement in the pathogenesis. Included in this category are hypersensitivity pneumonitis, mycobacteriosis (all forms) and sarcoidosis, as well as beryllium disease and other lung diseases caused by exposure to heavy metals. In order to highlight the risk of developing one of these diseases as a result of environmental or occupational exposure to etiologic agents, we address aspects related to epidemiology, pathogenesis and evaluation of exposure of these diseases, as well as those related to diagnostic criteria, prevention and control. We have given special emphasis to groups of individuals considered to be at high risk for developing these diseases, as well as to the need for health care professionals to remain aware of the potential occupational etiology of such diseases, a decisive factor in devising effective measures of prevention and epidemiological surveillance.
    Jornal brasileiro de pneumologia: publicacao oficial da Sociedade Brasileira de Pneumologia e Tisilogia 02/2006; 32 Suppl 2:S69-84.
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    ABSTRACT: The determination of functional consequences (dysfunction) and their impact on daily life (incapacitation) is central to the evaluation of patients with occupational respiratory diseases. The present review addresses the fundamentals underlying the instruments used to determine the degree of dysfunction, including clinical aspects, as well as those related to pulmonary function and, in some circumstances, exercise tolerance. In particular, a multifactorial system of classifying the degree of dysfunction is presented, with the objective of informing decisions related to the awarding of retirement benefits in Brazil.
    Jornal brasileiro de pneumologia: publicacao oficial da Sociedade Brasileira de Pneumologia e Tisilogia 02/2006; 32 Suppl 2:S93-8.
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    Jornal Brasileiro de Pneumologia 01/2006; 32. · 1.27 Impact Factor
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    Jornal Brasileiro De Pneumologia - J BRAS PNEUMOL. 01/2006; 32.
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    Ericson Bagatin, Satoshi Kitamura
    Jornal Brasileiro De Pneumologia - J BRAS PNEUMOL. 01/2006; 32.

Publication Stats

126 Citations
42.97 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1997–2013
    • University of Campinas
      • • Faculdade de Ciências Médicas (FCM)
      • • Hospital de Clínicas
      Conceição de Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil
  • 2006–2008
    • Universidade Federal de São Paulo
      • School of Medicine
      San Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil