Gonçalo R Abecasis

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States

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Publications (295)4560.6 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal mendelian long-QT syndrome (LQTS). Using a genome-wide association and replication study in up to 100,000 individuals, we identified 35 common variant loci associated with QT interval that collectively explain ∼8-10% of QT-interval variation and highlight the importance of calcium regulation in myocardial repolarization. Rare variant analysis of 6 new QT interval-associated loci in 298 unrelated probands with LQTS identified coding variants not found in controls but of uncertain causality and therefore requiring validation. Several newly identified loci encode proteins that physically interact with other recognized repolarization proteins. Our integration of common variant association, expression and orthogonal protein-protein interaction screens provides new insights into cardiac electrophysiology and identifies new candidate genes for ventricular arrhythmias, LQTS and SCD.
    Nat Genet. 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies have identified 41 independent genome-wide significant psoriasis susceptibility loci. After our first psoriasis genome-wide association study, we designed a custom genotyping array to fine-map eight genome-wide significant susceptibility loci known at that time (IL23R, IL13, IL12B, TNIP1, MHC, TNFAIP3, IL23A and RNF114) enabling genotyping of 2269 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the eight loci for 2699 psoriasis cases and 2107 unaffected controls of European ancestry. We imputed these data using the latest 1000 Genome reference haplotypes, which included both indels and SNPs, to increase the marker density of the eight loci to 49 239 genetic variants. Using stepwise conditional association analysis, we identified nine independent signals distributed across six of the eight loci. In the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, we detected three independent signals at rs114255771 (P=2.94 × 10(-74)), rs6924962 (P=3.21 × 10(-19)) and rs892666 (P=1.11 × 10(-10)). Near IL12B we detected two independent signals at rs62377586 (P=7.42 × 10(-16)) and rs918518 (P=3.22 × 10(-11)). Only one signal was observed in each of the TNIP1 (rs17728338; P=4.15 × 10(-13)), IL13 (rs1295685; P=1.65 × 10(-7)), IL23A (rs61937678; P=1.82 × 10(-7)) and TNFAIP3 (rs642627; P=5.90 × 10(-7)) regions. We also imputed variants for eight HLA genes and found that SNP rs114255771 yielded a more significant association than any HLA allele or amino-acid residue. Further analysis revealed that the HLA-C*06-B*57 haplotype tagged by this SNP had a significantly higher odds ratio than other HLA-C*06-bearing haplotypes. The results demonstrate allelic heterogeneity at IL12B and identify a high-risk MHC class I haplotype, consistent with the existence of multiple psoriasis effectors in the MHC.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 3 September 2014; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2014.172.
    European journal of human genetics: EJHG 09/2014; · 3.56 Impact Factor
  • Seunggeung Lee, Gonçalo R Abecasis, Michael Boehnke, Xihong Lin
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    ABSTRACT: Despite the extensive discovery of trait- and disease-associated common variants, much of the genetic contribution to complex traits remains unexplained. Rare variants can explain additional disease risk or trait variability. An increasing number of studies are underway to identify trait- and disease-associated rare variants. In this review, we provide an overview of statistical issues in rare-variant association studies with a focus on study designs and statistical tests. We present the design and analysis pipeline of rare-variant studies and review cost-effective sequencing designs and genotyping platforms. We compare various gene- or region-based association tests, including burden tests, variance-component tests, and combined omnibus tests, in terms of their assumptions and performance. Also discussed are the related topics of meta-analysis, population-stratification adjustment, genotype imputation, follow-up studies, and heritability due to rare variants. We provide guidelines for analysis and discuss some of the challenges inherent in these studies and future research directions.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 07/2014; 95(1):5-23. · 11.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neurodegenerative diseases affecting the macula constitute a major cause of incurable vision loss and exhibit considerable clinical and genetic heterogeneity, from early-onset monogenic disease to multifactorial late-onset age-related macular degeneration (AMD). As part of our continued efforts to define genetic causes of macular degeneration, we performed whole exome sequencing in four individuals of a two-generation family with autosomal dominant maculopathy and identified a rare variant p.Glu1144Lys in Fibrillin 2 (FBN2), a glycoprotein of the elastin-rich extracellular matrix (ECM). Sanger sequencing validated the segregation of this variant in the complete pedigree, including two additional affected and one unaffected individual. Sequencing of 192 maculopathy patients revealed additional rare variants, predicted to disrupt FBN2 function. We then undertook additional studies to explore the relationship of FBN2 to macular disease. We show that FBN2 localizes to Bruch's membrane and its expression appears to be reduced in aging and AMD eyes, prompting us to examine its relationship with AMD. We detect suggestive association of a common FBN2 non-synonymous variant, rs154001 (p.Val965Ile) with AMD in 10,337 cases and 11,174 controls (OR=1.10; p-value=3.79×10(-5)). Thus, it appears that rare and common variants in a single gene - FBN2 - can contribute to Mendelian and complex forms of macular degeneration. Our studies provide genetic evidence for a key role of elastin microfibers and Bruch's membrane in maintaining blood-retina homeostasis and establish the importance of studying orphan diseases for understanding more common clinical phenotypes.
    Human Molecular Genetics 06/2014; · 7.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: RAREMETAL is a computationally efficient tool for meta-analysis of rare variants genotyped using sequencing or arrays. RAREMETAL facilitates analyses of individual studies, accommodates a variety of input file formats, handles related and unrelated individuals, executes both single variant and burden tests, and performs conditional association analyses. Availability: http://genome.sph.umich.edu/wiki/RAREMETAL for executables, source code, documentation and tutorial.
    Bioinformatics (Oxford, England). 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Genome sequencing of the 5,300-year-old mummy of the Tyrolean Iceman, found in 1991 on a glacier near the border of Italy and Austria, has yielded new insights into his origin and relationship to modern European populations. A key finding of that study was an apparent recent common ancestry with individuals from Sardinia, based largely on the Y chromosome haplogroup and common autosomal SNP variation. Here, we compiled and analyzed genomic datasets from both modern and ancient Europeans, including genome sequence data from over 400 Sardinians and two ancient Thracians from Bulgaria, to investigate this result in greater detail and determine its implications for the genetic structure of Neolithic Europe. Using whole-genome sequencing data, we confirm that the Iceman is, indeed, most closely related to Sardinians. Furthermore, we show that this relationship extends to other individuals from cultural contexts associated with the spread of agriculture during the Neolithic transition, in contrast to individuals from a hunter-gatherer context. We hypothesize that this genetic affinity of ancient samples from different parts of Europe with Sardinians represents a common genetic component that was geographically widespread across Europe during the Neolithic, likely related to migrations and population expansions associated with the spread of agriculture.
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    ABSTRACT: Genome sequencing of the 5,300-year-old mummy of the Tyrolean Iceman, found in 1991 on a glacier near the border of Italy and Austria, has yielded new insights into his origin and relationship to modern European populations. A key finding of that study was an apparent recent common ancestry with individuals from Sardinia, based largely on the Y chromosome haplogroup and common autosomal SNP variation. Here, we compiled and analyzed genomic datasets from both modern and ancient Europeans, including genome sequence data from over 400 Sardinians and two ancient Thracians from Bulgaria, to investigate this result in greater detail and determine its implications for the genetic structure of Neolithic Europe. Using whole-genome sequencing data, we confirm that the Iceman is, indeed, most closely related to Sardinians. Furthermore, we show that this relationship extends to other individuals from cultural contexts associated with the spread of agriculture during the Neolithic transition, in contrast to individuals from a hunter-gatherer context. We hypothesize that this genetic affinity of ancient samples from different parts of Europe with Sardinians represents a common genetic component that was geographically widespread across Europe during the Neolithic, likely related to migrations and population expansions associated with the spread of agriculture.
    PLoS Genetics 05/2014; 10(5):e1004353. · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The discovery of rare genetic variants is accelerating, and clear guidelines for distinguishing disease-causing sequence variants from the many potentially functional variants present in any human genome are urgently needed. Without rigorous standards we risk an acceleration of false-positive reports of causality, which would impede the translation of genomic research findings into the clinical diagnostic setting and hinder biological understanding of disease. Here we discuss the key challenges of assessing sequence variants in human disease, integrating both gene-level and variant-level support for causality. We propose guidelines for summarizing confidence in variant pathogenicity and highlight several areas that require further resource development.
    Nature 04/2014; 508(7497):469-76. · 38.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genetic and genomic studies have enhanced our understanding of complex neurodegenerative diseases that exert a devastating impact on individuals and society. One such disease, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), is a major cause of progressive and debilitating visual impairment. Since the pioneering discovery in 2005 of complement factor H (CFH) as a major AMD susceptibility gene, extensive investigations have confirmed 19 additional genetic risk loci, and more are anticipated. In addition to common variants identified by now-conventional genome-wide association studies, targeted genomic sequencing and exome-chip analyses are uncovering rare variant alleles of high impact. Here, we provide a critical review of the ongoing genetic studies and of common and rare risk variants at a total of 20 susceptibility loci, which together explain 40-60% of the disease heritability but provide limited power for diagnostic testing of disease risk. Identification of these susceptibility loci has begun to untangle the complex biological pathways underlying AMD pathophysiology, pointing to new testable paradigms for treatment. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Genomics and Human Genetics Volume 15 is September 01, 2014. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/catalog/pubdates.aspx for revised estimates.
    Annual review of genomics and human genetics 04/2014; · 11.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies have identified variants, primarily common, that are associated with coronary artery disease or myocardial infarction (MI), but have not tested the majority of the low frequency and rare variation in the genome. We explored the hypothesis that previously untested low frequency (1-5% minor allele frequency) and rare (<1% minor allele frequency) coding variants are associated with MI. We genotyped 2,906 MI cases and 6,738 non-MI controls from Norway using the Illumina HumanExome Beadchip, allowing for direct genotyping of 85,972 polymorphic coding variants as well as 48 known GWAS SNPs. We followed-up 37 coding variants in an additional 2,350 MI cases and 2,318 controls from Norway. We evaluated exome array coverage in a subset of these samples using whole exome sequencing (N=151). The exome array provided successful genotyping for an estimated 72.5% of Norwegian loss-of-function or missense variants with frequency >1% and 66.2% of variants <1% frequency observed more than once. Despite 80% power in the two-stage study (N=14,312) to detect association with low frequency variants with high effect sizes (odds ratio [OR] >1.86 and >1.36 for 1% and 5% frequency, respectively), we did not identify any novel genes or single variants that reached significance. This suggests that low frequency coding variants with large effect sizes (OR >2) may not exist for MI. Larger sample sizes may identify coding variants with more moderate effects.
    Human Molecular Genetics 04/2014; · 7.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Blood lipid levels are heritable, treatable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. We systematically assessed genome-wide coding variation to identify new genes influencing lipid traits, fine map known lipid loci and evaluate whether low-frequency variants with large effects exist for these traits. Using an exome array, we genotyped 80,137 coding variants in 5,643 Norwegians. We followed up 18 variants in 4,666 Norwegians and identified ten loci with coding variants associated with a lipid trait (P < 5 × 10(-8)). One variant in TM6SF2 (encoding p.Glu167Lys), residing in a known genome-wide association study locus for lipid traits, influences total cholesterol levels and is associated with myocardial infarction. Transient TM6SF2 overexpression or knockdown of Tm6sf2 in mice alters serum lipid profiles, consistent with the association observed in humans, identifying TM6SF2 as a functional gene within a locus previously known as NCAN-CILP2-PBX4 or 19p13. This study demonstrates that systematic assessment of coding variation can quickly point to a candidate causal gene.
    Nature Genetics 03/2014; · 35.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Estimating individual ancestry is important in genetic association studies where population structure leads to false positive signals, although assigning ancestry remains challenging with targeted sequence data. We propose a new method for the accurate estimation of individual genetic ancestry, based on direct analysis of off-target sequence reads, and implement our method in the publicly available LASER software. We validate the method using simulated and empirical data and show that the method can accurately infer worldwide continental ancestry when used with sequencing data sets with whole-genome shotgun coverage as low as 0.001×. For estimates of fine-scale ancestry within Europe, the method performs well with coverage of 0.1×. On an even finer scale, the method improves discrimination between exome-sequenced study participants originating from different provinces within Finland. Finally, we show that our method can be used to improve case-control matching in genetic association studies and to reduce the risk of spurious findings due to population structure.
    Nature Genetics 03/2014; · 35.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Loss-of-function mutations protective against human disease provide in vivo validation of therapeutic targets, but none have yet been described for type 2 diabetes (T2D). Through sequencing or genotyping of ~150,000 individuals across 5 ancestry groups, we identified 12 rare protein-truncating variants in SLC30A8, which encodes an islet zinc transporter (ZnT8) and harbors a common variant (p.Trp325Arg) associated with T2D risk and glucose and proinsulin levels. Collectively, carriers of protein-truncating variants had 65% reduced T2D risk (P = 1.7 × 10−6), and non-diabetic Icelandic carriers of a frameshift variant (p.Lys34Serfs*50) demonstrated reduced glucose levels (−0.17 s.d., P = 4.6 × 10−4). The two most common protein-truncating variants (p.Arg138* and p.Lys34Serfs*50) individually associate with T2D protection and encode unstable ZnT8 proteins. Previous functional study of SLC30A8 suggested that reduced zinc transport increases T2D risk, and phenotypic heterogeneity was observed in mouse Slc30a8 knockouts. In contrast, loss-of-function mutations in humans provide strong evidence that SLC30A8 haploinsufficiency protects against T2D, suggesting ZnT8 inhibition as a therapeutic strategy in T2D prevention.
    Nature Genetics 03/2014; · 35.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To further understanding of the genetic basis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) susceptibility, we aggregated published meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), including 26,488 cases and 83,964 controls of European, east Asian, south Asian and Mexican and Mexican American ancestry. We observed a significant excess in the directional consistency of T2D risk alleles across ancestry groups, even at SNPs demonstrating only weak evidence of association. By following up the strongest signals of association from the trans-ethnic meta-analysis in an additional 21,491 cases and 55,647 controls of European ancestry, we identified seven new T2D susceptibility loci. Furthermore, we observed considerable improvements in the fine-mapping resolution of common variant association signals at several T2D susceptibility loci. These observations highlight the benefits of trans-ethnic GWAS for the discovery and characterization of complex trait loci and emphasize an exciting opportunity to extend insight into the genetic architecture and pathogenesis of human diseases across populations of diverse ancestry.
    Nature Genetics 03/2014; 46(3):234-244. · 35.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The prevalence of CKD and of renal failure vary worldwide, yet parallel increases in leading risk factors explain only part of the differential prevalence. We measured CKD prevalence and eGFR, and their relationship with traditional and additional risk factors, in a Sardinian founder population cohort. The eGFR was calculated using equations from the CKD Epidemiology Collaboration and Modification of Diet in Renal Disease studies. With use of the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes guidelines, a cross-sectional analysis of 4842 individuals showed that CKD prevalence was 15.1%, including 3.6% of patients in the high-risk and 0.46% in the very-high-risk categories. Longitudinal analyses performed on 4074 of these individuals who completed three visits with an average follow-up of 7 years revealed that, consistent with other populations, average eGFR slope was -0.79 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year, but 11.4% of the participants had an eGFR decline >2.3 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year (fast decline). A genetic score was generated from 13 reported eGFR- and CKD-related loci, and univariable and multivariable analyses were applied to assess the relationship between clinical, ultrasonographic, and genetic variables with three outcomes: CKD, change in eGFR, and fast eGFR decline. Genetic risk score, older age, and female sex independently correlated with each outcome. Diabetes was associated with CKD prevalence, whereas hypertension and hyperuricemia correlated more strongly with fast eGFR decline. Diabetes, hypertension, hyperuricemia, and high baseline eGFR were associated with a decline of eGFR. Along with differential health practices, population variations in this spectrum of risk factors probably contributes to the variable CKD prevalence worldwide.
    Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 02/2014; · 8.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a treatable, heritable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified 157 variants associated with lipid levels but are not well suited to assess the impact of rare and low-frequency variants. To determine whether rare or low-frequency coding variants are associated with LDL-C, we exome sequenced 2,005 individuals, including 554 individuals selected for extreme LDL-C (>98(th) or <2(nd) percentile). Follow-up analyses included sequencing of 1,302 additional individuals and genotype-based analysis of 52,221 individuals. We observed significant evidence of association between LDL-C and the burden of rare or low-frequency variants in PNPLA5, encoding a phospholipase-domain-containing protein, and both known and previously unidentified variants in PCSK9, LDLR and APOB, three known lipid-related genes. The effect sizes for the burden of rare variants for each associated gene were substantially higher than those observed for individual SNPs identified from GWASs. We replicated the PNPLA5 signal in an independent large-scale sequencing study of 2,084 individuals. In conclusion, this large whole-exome-sequencing study for LDL-C identified a gene not known to be implicated in LDL-C and provides unique insight into the design and analysis of similar experiments.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 02/2014; 94(2):233-45. · 11.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis), as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease). As the possible causative genes of TPOAbs and AITD remain largely unknown, we performed GWAS meta-analyses in 18,297 individuals for TPOAb-positivity (1769 TPOAb-positives and 16,528 TPOAb-negatives) and in 12,353 individuals for TPOAb serum levels, with replication in 8,990 individuals. Significant associations (P<5×10(-8)) were detected at TPO-rs11675434, ATXN2-rs653178, and BACH2-rs10944479 for TPOAb-positivity, and at TPO-rs11675434, MAGI3-rs1230666, and KALRN-rs2010099 for TPOAb levels. Individual and combined effects (genetic risk scores) of these variants on (subclinical) hypo- and hyperthyroidism, goiter and thyroid cancer were studied. Individuals with a high genetic risk score had, besides an increased risk of TPOAb-positivity (OR: 2.18, 95% CI 1.68-2.81, P = 8.1×10(-8)), a higher risk of increased thyroid-stimulating hormone levels (OR: 1.51, 95% CI 1.26-1.82, P = 2.9×10(-6)), as well as a decreased risk of goiter (OR: 0.77, 95% CI 0.66-0.89, P = 6.5×10(-4)). The MAGI3 and BACH2 variants were associated with an increased risk of hyperthyroidism, which was replicated in an independent cohort of patients with Graves' disease (OR: 1.37, 95% CI 1.22-1.54, P = 1.2×10(-7) and OR: 1.25, 95% CI 1.12-1.39, P = 6.2×10(-5)). The MAGI3 variant was also associated with an increased risk of hypothyroidism (OR: 1.57, 95% CI 1.18-2.10, P = 1.9×10(-3)). This first GWAS meta-analysis for TPOAbs identified five newly associated loci, three of which were also associated with clinical thyroid disease. With these markers we identified a large subgroup in the general population with a substantially increased risk of TPOAbs. The results provide insight into why individuals with thyroid autoimmunity do or do not eventually develop thyroid disease, and these markers may therefore predict which TPOAb-positives are particularly at risk of developing clinical thyroid dysfunction.
    PLoS Genetics 02/2014; 10(2):e1004123. · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To increase our understanding of psoriasis, we utilized RNA-seq to assay the transcriptomes of lesional psoriatic and normal skin. We sequenced polyadenylated RNA-derived cDNAs from 92 psoriatic and 82 normal punch biopsies, generating an average of ~38 million single-end 80-bp reads per sample. Comparison of 42 samples examined by both RNA-seq and microarray revealed marked differences in sensitivity, with transcripts identified only by RNA-seq having much lower expression than those also identified by microarray. RNA-seq identified many more differentially expressed transcripts enriched in immune system processes. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) revealed multiple modules of coordinately expressed epidermal differentiation genes, overlapping significantly with genes regulated by the long non-coding RNA TINCR, its target gene, staufen-1 (STAU1), the p63 target gene ZNF750, and its target KLF4. Other coordinately expressed modules were enriched for lymphoid and/or myeloid signature transcripts and genes induced by IL-17 in keratinocytes. Dermally-expressed genes were significantly down-regulated in psoriatic biopsies, most likely due to expansion of the epidermal compartment. These results demonstrate the power of WGCNA to elucidate gene regulatory circuits in psoriasis, and emphasize the influence of tissue architecture in both differential expression and co-expression analysis.Journal of Investigative Dermatology accepted article preview online, 17 January 2014. doi:10.1038/jid.2014.28.
    Journal of Investigative Dermatology 01/2014; · 6.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Psoriasis vulgaris (PsV) risk is strongly associated with variation within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, but its genetic architecture has yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we conducted a large-scale fine-mapping study of PsV risk in the MHC region in 9,247 PsV-affected individuals and 13,589 controls of European descent by imputing class I and II human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes from SNP genotype data. In addition, we imputed sequence variants for MICA, an MHC HLA-like gene that has been associated with PsV, to evaluate association at that locus as well. We observed that HLA-C *06:02 demonstrated the lowest p value for overall PsV risk (p = 1.7 x 10-364). Stepwise analysis revealed multiple HLA-C *06:02-independent risk variants in both class I and class II HLA genes for PsV susceptibility (HLA-C *12:03, HLA-B amino acid positions 67 and 9, HLA-A amino acid position 95, and HLA-DQalpha1 amino acid position 53; p < 5.0 x 10-8), but no apparent risk conferred by MICA. We further evaluated risk of two major clinical subtypes of PsV, psoriatic arthritis (PsA; n = 3,038) and cutaneous psoriasis (PsC; n = 3,098). We found that risk heterogeneity between PsA and PsC might be driven by HLA-B amino acid position 45 (pomnibus = 2.2 x 10-11), indicating that different genetic factors underlie the overall risk of PsV and the risk of specific PsV subphenotypes. Our study illustrates the value of high-resolution HLA and MICA imputation for fine mapping causal variants in the MHC.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 01/2014; · 11.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To determine whether genotypes at 2 major loci associated with late age-related macular degeneration (AMD), complement factor H (CFH) and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2), influence the relative benefits of Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) supplements. Design Unplanned retrospective evaluation of a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial of vitamins and minerals for the treatment of AMD. Subjects AREDS participants (mean age, 69 years) who were at risk of developing late AMD and who were randomized to the 4 arms of AREDS supplement treatment. Methods Analyses were performed using the Cox proportional hazards model to predict progression to late AMD (neovascular or central geographic atrophy). Statistical models, adjusted for age, gender, smoking status, and baseline AMD severity, were used to examine the influence of genotypes on the response to therapy with 4 randomly assigned arms of AREDS supplement components: placebo, antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E, β-carotene), zinc or a combination. Main Outcome Measures The influence of the genotype on the relative treatment response to the randomized components of the AREDS supplement, measured as progression to late AMD. Results Of the 1237 genotyped AREDS participants of white ethnicity, late AMD developed in 385 (31.1%) during the mean follow-up of 6.6 years. As previously demonstrated, CFH genotype (P = 0.005), ARMS2 (P< 0.0001), and supplement were associated individually with progression to late AMD. An interaction analysis found no evidence that the relative benefits of AREDS supplementation varied by genotype. Analysis of (1) CFH rs1061170 and rs1410996 combined with ARMS2 rs10490924 with the 4 randomly assigned arms of AREDS supplement and (2) analysis of the combination of CFH rs412852 and rs3766405 with ARMS2 c.372_815del443ins54 with the AREDS components resulted in no interaction (P = 0.06 and P = 0.45, respectively, before multiplicity adjustment). Conclusions The AREDS supplements reduced the rate of AMD progression across all genotype groups. Furthermore, the genotypes at the CFH and ARMS2 loci did not statistically significantly alter the benefits of AREDS supplements. Genetic testing remains a valuable research tool, but these analyses suggest it provides no benefits in managing nutritional supplementation for patients at risk of late AMD.
    Ophthalmology 01/2014; · 5.56 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

45k Citations
4,560.60 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2002–2014
    • University of Michigan
      • • Department of Biostatistics
      • • Department of Dermatology
      • • School of Public Health
      • • Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences
      • • Center for Statistical Genetics
      Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
    • King's College London
      • Institute of Psychiatry
      London, ENG, United Kingdom
  • 2013
    • University of California, Berkeley
      Berkeley, California, United States
    • Columbia University
      • Department of Psychiatry
      New York City, New York, United States
    • Università degli Studi di Sassari
      • Dipartimento di Scienze della Natura e del Territorio
      Sassari, Sardinia, Italy
    • Universität Regensburg
      Ratisbon, Bavaria, Germany
    • Harvard Medical School
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2012–2013
    • Vanderbilt University
      • Center for Human Genetics Research (CHGR)
      Nashville, Michigan, United States
    • University of Pennsylvania
      • Department of Pharmacology
      Philadelphia, PA, United States
    • University of Chicago
      • Department of Human Genetics
      Chicago, IL, United States
    • Childrens Hospital of Pittsburgh
      Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
    • McGill University
      • Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
    • Massachusetts General Hospital
      • Cardiovascular Research Center
      Boston, MA, United States
  • 2005–2013
    • Concordia University–Ann Arbor
      Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
    • Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
      Cold Spring Harbor, New York, United States
  • 2010–2012
    • Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel
      • Institute of Clinical Molecular Biology
      Kiel, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
    • University Hospital Regensburg
      Ratisbon, Bavaria, Germany
    • University of Exeter
      • Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry
      Exeter, ENG, United Kingdom
    • Imperial College London
      • Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics
      London, ENG, United Kingdom
    • Calvin College
      • Department of Mathematics and Statistics
      Grand Rapids, MI, United States
  • 2009–2012
    • National Institute on Aging
      • Laboratory of Genetics (LG)
      Baltimore, MD, United States
    • National Institutes of Health
      • Laboratory of Neurobiology-Neurodegeneration and Repair
      Bethesda, MD, United States
    • MedStar Health Research Institute
      Maryland, United States
    • National Eye Institute
      Maryland, United States
  • 2008–2012
    • Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard
      • Program in Medical and Population Genetics
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
    • Boston Children's Hospital
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    • Lund University
      • Department of Clinical Sciences
      Lund, Skane, Sweden
  • 2006–2012
    • National Research Council
      • Institute of Neurogenetics and Neuropharmacology IRGB
      Roma, Latium, Italy
    • University of Colorado
      • Department of Medicine
      Denver, CO, United States
  • 2000–2012
    • University of Oxford
      • Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics
      Oxford, ENG, United Kingdom
  • 2011
    • Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute
      Cambridge, England, United Kingdom
  • 2008–2011
    • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
      • • Department of Genetics
      • • Department of Biostatistics
      Chapel Hill, NC, United States
  • 2003
    • The Rockefeller University
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2001
    • The University of the West Indies at Mona
      Kingston, Kingston, Jamaica