Shennan Lu

National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, United States

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Publications (6)52.85 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: CDD, the Conserved Domain Database, is part of NCBI's Entrez query and retrieval system and is also accessible via http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/cdd/cdd.shtml. CDD provides annotation of protein sequences with the location of conserved domain footprints and functional sites inferred from these footprints. Pre-computed annotation is available via Entrez, and interactive search services accept single protein or nucleotide queries, as well as batch submissions of protein query sequences, utilizing RPS-BLAST to rapidly identify putative matches. CDD incorporates several protein domain and full-length protein model collections, and maintains an active curation effort that aims at providing fine grained classifications for major and well-characterized protein domain families, as supported by available protein three-dimensional (3D) structure and the published literature. To this date, the majority of protein 3D structures are represented by models tracked by CDD, and CDD curators are characterizing novel families that emerge from protein structure determination efforts.
    Nucleic Acids Research 11/2012; · 8.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Close to 60% of protein sequences tracked in comprehensive databases can be mapped to a known three-dimensional (3D) structure by standard sequence similarity searches. Potentially, a great deal can be learned about proteins or protein families of interest from considering 3D structure, and to this day 3D structure data may remain an underutilized resource. Here we present enhancements in the Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB) and its data presentation, specifically pertaining to biologically relevant complexes and molecular interactions. MMDB is tightly integrated with NCBI's Entrez search and retrieval system, and mirrors the contents of the Protein Data Bank. It links protein 3D structure data with sequence data, sequence classification resources and PubChem, a repository of small-molecule chemical structures and their biological activities, facilitating access to 3D structure data not only for structural biologists, but also for molecular biologists and chemists. MMDB provides a complete set of detailed and pre-computed structural alignments obtained with the VAST algorithm, and provides visualization tools for 3D structure and structure/sequence alignment via the molecular graphics viewer Cn3D. MMDB can be accessed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/structure.
    Nucleic Acids Research 12/2011; 40(Database issue):D461-4. · 8.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: NCBI's Conserved Domain Database (CDD) is a resource for the annotation of protein sequences with the location of conserved domain footprints, and functional sites inferred from these footprints. CDD includes manually curated domain models that make use of protein 3D structure to refine domain models and provide insights into sequence/structure/function relationships. Manually curated models are organized hierarchically if they describe domain families that are clearly related by common descent. As CDD also imports domain family models from a variety of external sources, it is a partially redundant collection. To simplify protein annotation, redundant models and models describing homologous families are clustered into superfamilies. By default, domain footprints are annotated with the corresponding superfamily designation, on top of which specific annotation may indicate high-confidence assignment of family membership. Pre-computed domain annotation is available for proteins in the Entrez/Protein dataset, and a novel interface, Batch CD-Search, allows the computation and download of annotation for large sets of protein queries. CDD can be accessed via http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/cdd/cdd.shtml.
    Nucleic Acids Research 01/2011; 39(Database issue):D225-9. · 8.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: NCBI's Conserved Domain Database (CDD) is a collection of multiple sequence alignments and derived database search models, which represent protein domains conserved in molecular evolution. The collection can be accessed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/cdd/cdd.shtml, and is also part of NCBI's Entrez query and retrieval system, cross-linked to numerous other resources. CDD provides annotation of domain footprints and conserved functional sites on protein sequences. Precalculated domain annotation can be retrieved for protein sequences tracked in NCBI's Entrez system, and CDD's collection of models can be queried with novel protein sequences via the CD-Search service at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/cdd/wrpsb.cgi. Starting with the latest version of CDD, v2.14, information from redundant and homologous domain models is summarized at a superfamily level, and domain annotation on proteins is flagged as either 'specific' (identifying molecular function with high confidence) or as 'non-specific' (identifying superfamily membership only).
    Nucleic Acids Research 12/2008; 37(Database issue):D205-10. · 8.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Three-dimensional (3D) structure is now known for a large fraction of all protein families. Thus, it has become rather likely that one will find a homolog with known 3D structure when searching a sequence database with an arbitrary query sequence. Depending on the extent of similarity, such neighbor relationships may allow one to infer biological function and to identify functional sites such as binding motifs or catalytic centers. Entrez's 3D-structure database, the Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB), provides easy access to the richness of 3D structure data and its large potential for functional annotation. Entrez's search engine offers several tools to assist biologist users: (i) links between databases, such as between protein sequences and structures, (ii) pre-computed sequence and structure neighbors, (iii) visualization of structure and sequence/structure alignment. Here, we describe an annotation service that combines some of these tools automatically, Entrez's 'Related Structure' links. For all proteins in Entrez, similar sequences with known 3D structure are detected by BLAST and alignments are recorded. The 'Related Structure' service summarizes this information and presents 3D views mapping sequence residues onto all 3D structures available in MMDB (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=structure).
    Nucleic Acids Research 02/2007; 35(Database issue):D298-300. · 8.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The conserved domain database (CDD) is part of NCBI's Entrez database system and serves as a primary resource for the annotation of conserved domain footprints on protein sequences in Entrez. Entrez's global query interface can be accessed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Entrez and will search CDD and many other databases. Domain annotation for proteins in Entrez has been pre-computed and is readily available in the form of 'Conserved Domain' links. Novel protein sequences can be scanned against CDD using the CD-Search service; this service searches databases of CDD-derived profile models with protein sequence queries using BLAST heuristics, at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/cdd/wrpsb.cgi. Protein query sequences submitted to NCBI's protein BLAST search service are scanned for conserved domain signatures by default. The CDD collection contains models imported from Pfam, SMART and COG, as well as domain models curated at NCBI. NCBI curated models are organized into hierarchies of domains related by common descent. Here we report on the status of the curation effort and present a novel helper application, CDTree, which enables users of the CDD resource to examine curated hierarchies. More importantly, CDD and CDTree used in concert, serve as a powerful tool in protein classification, as they allow users to analyze protein sequences in the context of domain family hierarchies.
    Nucleic Acids Research 02/2007; 35(Database issue):D237-40. · 8.81 Impact Factor