C L Coleman

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

Are you C L Coleman?

Claim your profile

Publications (6)11.43 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Depressive symptoms are highly prevalent yet undertreated in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHAs). As part of a larger study of symptom self-management (N=1217), this study examined the prevalence, correlates, and characteristics (intensity, distress, and impact) of depressive symptoms, and the self-care strategies used to manage those symptoms in PLHAs in five countries. The proportion of respondents from each country in the total sample reporting depressive symptoms in the past week varied and included Colombia (44%), Norway (66%), Puerto Rico (57%), Taiwan (35%), and the USA (56%). Fifty-four percent (n=655) of the total sample reported experiencing depressive symptoms in the past week, with a mean of 4.1 (SD 2.1) days of depression. Mean depression intensity 5.4 (SD 2.7), distressfulness 5.5 (SD 2.86), and impact 5.5 (SD 3.0) were rated on a 1-10 scale. The mean Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale score for those reporting depressive symptoms was 27 (SD 11; range 3-58), and varied significantly by country. Respondents identified 19 self-care behaviors for depressive symptoms, which fell into six categories: complementary therapies, talking to others, distraction techniques, physical activity, medications, and denial/avoidant coping. The most frequently used strategies varied by country. In the US sample, 33% of the variance in depressive symptoms was predicted by the combination of education, HIV symptoms, psychological and social support, and perceived consequences of HIV disease.
    AIDS Care 09/2010; 22(9):1159-70. · 1.60 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The prevalence of peripheral neuropathy is frequent in HIV disease and is often associated with antiretroviral therapy. Unhealthy behaviours, particularly substance-use behaviours, are utilized by many HIV-positive individuals to manage neuropathic symptoms. As part of a larger study on self-care for symptoms in HIV disease, this study analyzed the prevalence and characteristics of unhealthy behaviours to self-manage peripheral neuropathy in HIV disease. Sociodemographic and disease-related correlates and unhealthy behaviours were examined in a convenience sample of 1,217 respondents who were recruited from data collection sites in several US cities, Puerto Rico, Colombia, and Taiwan. Results of the study indicated that respondents with peripheral neuropathy (n=450) identified a variety of unhealthy self-care behaviours including injection drug use, oral drug use, smoking cigarettes and alcohol ingestion. Specific unhealthy behaviours that participants reported to alleviate peripheral neuropathy included use of marijuana (n=67), smoking cigarettes (n=139), drinking alcohol (n=81) and street drugs (n=30). A subset of those individuals (n=160), who identified high levels of neuropathy (greater than five on a scale of 1-10), indicated significantly higher use of amphetamines and injection drug use in addition to alcohol use and cigarette smoking. For participants from Norway, substance use (using alcohol: 56%) was one of the most frequent self-management strategies. Implications for clinical practice include assessment and education of persons with HIV for self-care management of the complex symptom of peripheral neuropathy.
    AIDS Care 12/2007; 19(10):1266-73. · 1.60 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Research has shown that the perceptions that form the cognitive representation of an illness (illness representation) are fundamental to how persons cope with illness. This study examined the relationship of illness representation of HIV with self-care behavior and health outcomes. Data were collected at 16 sites in the United States, Taiwan, Norway, Puerto Rico and Colombia via survey. HIV seropositive participants (n = 1,217, 31% female, 38% African-American/Black, 10% Asian/Pacific Islander and 26% White/Anglo) completed measures of illness representation based on the commonly accepted five-component structure: identity, time-line, consequences, cause, and cure/controllability (Weinman et al. 1996, Psychology and Health, 11, 431-445). Linear regression analyses were conducted to investigate relationships among illness representation, self-care behaviors and quality-of-life outcomes. Components of illness representation were associated with self-care and health outcomes, indicating that the cognitive representation of HIV has consequences for effective illness management. For example, perception that there is little that can be done to control HIV was significantly associated with fewer and less effective self-care activities (F = 12.86, P < .001) and poorer health function in the domain of quality-of-life (F = 13.89, P < .001). The concept of illness representation provides a useful framework for understanding HIV symptom management and may be useful in directing development of effective patient-centered interventions.
    AIDS and Behavior 08/2007; 13(2):258-67. · 3.49 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Peripheral neuropathy is the most common neurological complication in HIV and is often associated with antiretroviral therapy. As part of a larger study on self-care for symptoms in HIV disease, this study analyzed the prevalence and characteristics of peripheral neuropathy in HIV disease, sociodemographic and disease-related correlates and self-care strategies. A convenience sample of 1,217 respondents was recruited from data collection sites in several US cities, Puerto Rico, Colombia and Taiwan. Results of the study indicated that respondents with peripheral neuropathy (n=450) identified 20 self-care behaviors including complementary therapies, use of medications, exercise and rest and/or elevation of extremities. Ratings of frequency and effectiveness were also included. An activities checklist summarized into five categories of self-care behaviors including activities/thoughts, exercise, medications, complementary therapies and substance was used to determine self-care behaviors. Taking a hot bath was the most frequent strategy used by those with peripheral neuropathy (n=292) and received the highest overall rating of effectiveness of any self-management strategies included in this study at 8.1 (scale 1-10). Other self-care strategies to manage this symptom included: staying off the feet (n=258), rubbing the feet with cream (n=177), elevating the feet (n=236), walking (n=262), prescribed anti-epileptic agent (n=80), prescribed analgesics (n=84), over-the-counter medications (n=123), vitamin B (n=122), calcium supplements (n=72), magnesium (n=48), massage (n=156), acupuncture (n=43), reflexology (n=23) and meditation (n=80). Several behaviors that are often deemed unhealthy were included among the strategies reported to alleviate peripheral neuropathy including use of marijuana (n=67), cigarette smoking (n=139), drinking alcohol (n=81) and street drugs (n=30).
    AIDS Care 03/2007; 19(2):179-89. · 1.60 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study examines the frequency and effectiveness of commonly used strategies for self management of anxiety in an international sample of 502 participants from Norway (n=42, 8%), Taiwan (n=35, 7%), and the US (n=426, 85%). An activities checklist summarized into five categories of self-care behaviours including activities/thoughts, exercise, medications, complementary therapies, and substance use determined self-care behaviours. Ratings of frequency and effectiveness for each self-care activity were also included. Praying received the highest overall rating of effectiveness of any self-management strategies included in this study at 8.10 (scale 1 to 10), followed by meditation (7.37), exercising (7.32), using relaxation techniques (7.22), cooking (6.98), and walking (6.90). An analysis of effectiveness scores for each self-care strategy by country reflected a wide variation. The three most effective anxiety self-care strategies reported by participants from Norway included exercise (7.31), walking (6.96), and reading (6.44). Highest ratings of effectiveness by participants from Taiwan included talking with others with HIV (6.0), attending support groups (6.0), and exercising (6.0). US participants allocated highest ratings of effectiveness to complementary/alternative therapies, including praying (8.10), meditating (7.43), and using relaxation techniques (7.35). Regardless of the country, watching television and talking with family and friends were the two most frequently reported strategies. These strategies for self-management of HIV-related anxiety are important for clinicians to be aware of in the care of persons with HIV/AIDS.
    AIDS Care 09/2006; 18(6):597-607. · 1.60 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A grounded theory of Salvaging Quality of Life provided the conceptual framework for the development of the Living with HIV scale which was validated in this study. The HIV + convenience sample (n = 187) was 66% male, with a mean age of 40.6 years, 69% African-American, and with an average CD4 count of 229 mm3. A principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation was conducted on the final 32-item scale and nine factors with Eigenvalues > 1 explained 60% of the variance. A second order factor analysis of these nine factors resulted in a two factor solution (HIV Struggles and HIV Reverence) which explained 49.4% of the variance. Cronbach alpha reliability coefficient for the total scale was 0.84. Differences between gender, ethnicity, education and presence of an AIDS diagnosis, and quality of life, were explored. Females had higher total scores which suggested they had a more positive quality of life than males. The Living with HIV scale can be used as a method of obtaining input from patients for care planning and for evaluating the effectiveness of nursing care intervention using quality of life as an outcome of care.
    Journal of Advanced Nursing 10/1998; 28(3):622-30. · 1.53 Impact Factor