G Bönner

University of Cologne, Köln, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany

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Publications (84)149.44 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Antihypertensive drugs, recommended by the World Health Organization for use in monotherapy, exert different effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. In our study we compared the effects of the beta-blocker atenolol (AT) and the alpha1-blocker bunazosin (BU) on glucose metabolism. The doses administered were chosen to produce similar antihypertensive effects with both drugs. The study was conducted as a bicenter, parallel, controlled, and double-blind study. All patients suffered from mild to moderate primary hypertension, were obese (body mass index > 26 kg/m2), but were nondiabetic. After a drug-free period of 4 weeks, patients were treated either with 6 and 12 mg of bunazosin (n = 15) or with 50 and 100 mg of atenolol (n = 17) once daily for 12 weeks. Glucose metabolism was measured by the iv glucose tolerance test (GTT) and the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp test. The results show a similar blood pressure reduction with both drugs. However, their effects on glucose metabolism were significantly (p < 0.05) different: The area under the curve (AUC) of glucose in the iv GTT increased 26.8% during atenolol treatment but decreased 30% during bunazosin treatment. The same influence on the AUC of insulin was observed [AT +478.5 +/- 441.8 (+22%) vs. BU, -588.5 +/- 411.1 (-22%)]. Similar changes were found in the glucose clamp test. The metabolic clearance rate increased 11.4% during bunazosin use and decreased 8.4% during atenolol use to the same degree that the insulin sensitivity index changed (BU +13.2% vs. AT -21.9%). The differences between the two treatment regimes were statistically significant (p < 0.05). These results in obese hypertensives confirm the well-known negative effects of beta-blockers on glucose metabolism. Additionally, they demonstrate that an alpha1-blocker such as bunazosin develops the same blood pressure-lowering effect as beta-blockers, but with a significantly better profile with regard to glucose metabolism. Therefore, the use of alpha1-blockers can be recommended for obese hypertensives without any special care for glucose metabolism.
    Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy 03/1997; 11(1):21-6. · 2.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The sympathetic nervous system is unique in the regulation of plasma renin, for it can stimulate or suppress renin release by activation of either renal beta- or alpha 2-adrenoceptors. The authors studied plasma renin concentration (PRC), noradrenalin and adrenalin levels in plasma, and the densities of lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptors and thrombocyte alpha 2-adrenoceptors in 25 hypertensive patients with either normal (11-40 mU/L; n = 9) or low PRC (0-10 mU/L; n = 14). There were no differences in plasma catecholamine levels and adrenoceptor densities between the two patient groups. A positive correlation (r = 0.66; P < 0.005) between beta 2-adrenoceptor density and PRC in the patient group with low PRC, and a negative correlation (r = -0.72; P < 0.01) between alpha 2-adrenoceptor density and plasma renin in patients with normal PRC were found. They conclude that adrenoceptor densities on blood elements and plasma catecholamines do not differ in low and normal renin hypertension. The significant correlations between adrenoceptor densities and PRCs may indicate that adrenoceptors on blood elements mirror adrenoceptor densities in the kidney and that tonic suppression of renin release through alpha 2-adrenoceptors is preserved in hypertensive patients with normal plasma renin levels.
    Angiology 03/1995; 46(3):221-8. · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Prospective epidemiological studies on the evolution of the cardiovascular risk-profile in young adulthood have not been published so far for Germany. Methods: In 1975 a sample of 5 924 adolescents aged 15–19 was examined at schools in the city of Cologne. After reexamination in 1976 und 1980, a long-term follow-up was carried out with those still living in the city and thus being easily available in 1990. For that purpose 613 former adolescents were identified and invited to the university hospital; 210 young adults (143 males (M) and 67 females (F)) now 30 – 34 years old were examined for main cardiovascular risk factors using the same methodology as in 1975. Results: Whereas systolic and diastolic (phase 5) blood pressures (SBP and DBF) did not change very much, the means of total cholesterol (CHOL) and body-mass (BMI) increased considerably (CHOL from 158 mg/dl in 1975 to 195 in 1990 (M) and from 176 to 199 (F); BMI from 20.8 kg/sqm to 24.1 (M) and from 20.6 to 22.7 (F)). Pearson correlations increased especially between SBP and DBP (from .21 to .52 (M) and from .45 to .65 (F)) and between DBP and BMI (from .16 to .26 (M) and from .25 to .40 (F)). Autocorrelations remained quite high over the entire period (SBP .43, DBP .48, CHOL .42 and BMI.71 (M) and .51, .36, .49 and .81 (F)). Regression analysis shows that 51 % of the variance of SBP and of DBP in 1990 can be explained mainly by the foregoing measurements, but only 24 % of the variance of total cholesterol. Risk patterns in terms of aggregation of risk factors and risk habits worsened considerably during the 15 years of observation. Conclusion: Given the rarity of longitudinal risk factor observations in early adulthood, the Cologne data underline the considerable stability of cardiovascular risk factors also during this period of life and stress the importance of appropriate monitoring and intervention early in life.
    Journal of public health 01/1995; 3(2):145-155. · 1.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Many hypertensive patients have other, usually long-term diseases. Antihypertensive therapy may interfere with these diseases and their therapies. In the present study, the possible interactions of the ACE-inhibitor perindopril with several of the most common long-term diseases was evaluated. In a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, the effect of perindopril was evaluated in 490 patients with mild essential hypertension and any one of the following concomitant diseases: hyperlipidemia, type II diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, cardiac arrhythmia, peripheral arterial occlusive disease, nephropathy with proteinuria, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or degenerative joint disease treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). After a 3-week single-blind placebo run-in, the patients received either perindopril (4 mg/d) or matching placebo for 6 weeks. Blood pressure was effectively reduced by perindopril irrespective of the associated disease. The rate of spontaneously reported side effects was low. Treatment with perindopril was free from adverse interactions with the concomitant diseases and therapies. Moreover, favorable actions could be observed in patients with ischemic heart disease (reduction of maximal ST-segment depression during peak exercise and decrease in the number of angina attacks), in patients with proteinuria (decrease in albuminuria in patients with normal serum creatinine levels), and in patients with NSAID-treatment (increase in prostaglandin E2 concentration in gastric mucosa suggesting gastric cytoprotection). This trial shows that ACE-inhibition with perindopril represents a simple, safe, and effective short-term therapeutic option for the large proportion of patients with mild essential hypertension and concomitant diseases and therapies.
    The American Journal of Medicine 09/1994; 97(2):126-34. · 5.30 Impact Factor
  • G Bönner
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    ABSTRACT: Obesity is the most common reason for insulin resistance with consequent hyperinsulinemia. Other reasons for hyperinsulinemia are type II diabetes mellitus and a genetic predisposition with a family history of hypertension. Hyperinsulinemia is considered to cause blood pressure elevation and is generally accepted as an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis. However, insulin per se does not elevate blood pressure, but rather reduces total peripheral vascular resistance in experimental studies. Blood pressure might be elevated by other mechanisms secondary to hyperinsulinemia, however, such as enhanced renal sodium retention, elevated intracellular free calcium, and increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Indeed, subjects whose blood pressure is salt-sensitive exhibit hyperinsulinemia after glucose loading, and normotensive subjects with glucose-induced hyperinsulinemia will develop hypertension within 5 years more often than normoinsulinemic subjects. In primary hypertension, the incidence of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia is much higher than in normotensive controls. However, not all reported studies show a relationship between hyperinsulinemia and blood pressure elevation, and in some experimental studies no blood pressure elevation could be induced by prolonged hyperinsulinemia. Therefore, it is still unclear whether hyperinsulinemia induces hypertension or is only casually associated with it. Nevertheless, treatment of hyperinsulinemia is recommended to avoid secondary complications. Treatment should begin with weight reduction and physical exercise, which will improve insulin resistance. Hypertension benefits more from weight reduction than from exercise. If drug therapy of hypertension is required, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and calcium-channel blockers are the drugs of first choice. In addition, beta-blockers and centrally acting drugs appear to be of certain benefit. However, diuretics must be used carefully, because they ameliorate insulin resistance, induce dyslipoproteinemia, and stimulate the sympathetic nervous system.
    Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology 02/1994; 24 Suppl 2:S39-49. · 2.38 Impact Factor
  • Journal of hypertension. Supplement: official journal of the International Society of Hypertension 01/1994; 11(5):S210-1.
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    ABSTRACT: purpose: Many hypertensive patients have other, usually long-term diseases. Antihypertensive therapy may interfere with these diseases and their therapies. In the present study, the possible interactions of the ACE-inhibitor perindopril with several of the most common long-term diseases was evaluated.patients and methods: In a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, the effect of perindopril was evaluated in 490 patients with mild essential hypertension and any one of the following concomitant diseases: hyperlipidemia, type II diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, cardiac arrhythmia, peripheral arterial occlusive disease, nephropathy with proteinuria, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or degenerative joint disease treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). After a 3-week single-blind placebo run-in, the patients received either perindopril (4 mg/d) or matching placebo for 6 weeks.results: Blood pressure was effectively reduced by perindopril irrespective of the associated disease. The rate of spontaneously reported side effects was low. Treatment with perindopril was free from adverse interactions with the concomitant diseases and therapies. Moreover, favorable actions could be observed in patients with ischemic heart disease (reduction of maximal ST-segment depression during peak exercise and decrease in the number of angina attacks), in patients with proteinuria (decrease in albuminuria in patients with normal serum creatinine levels), and in patients with NSAID-treatment (increase in prostaglandin E2 concentration in gastric mucosa suggesting gastric cytoprotection).conclusion: This trial shows that ACE-inhibition with perindopril represents a simple, safe, and effective short-term therapeutic option for the large proportion of patients with mild essential hypertension and concomitant diseases and therapies.
    The American Journal of Medicine. 01/1994;
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    ABSTRACT: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are well established antihypertensives. Their effect on kidney function, however, seems to depend on the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the clinical symptoms. In one part of the Perindopril and Therapeutic Safety Study (PUTS) the effect of a 6-week treatment with placebo or 4 mg/d of perindopril (Coversum, CAS 82834-16-0) on kidney function and albuminuria was investigated in 56 hypertensives with concomitant nephropathy. The study was performed as multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study. The results show that perindopril reduced blood pressure effectively. The responder rate determined as a fall in blood pressure at least about 10 mmHg in the perindopril group was 39% vs. 21% in the placebo group. All investigated parameters of kidney function like serum creatinine, creatinine clearance, urinary excretion of albumin and alpha 1-microglobulin remained unchanged during the study. In a subgroup of patients with isolated albuminuria ACE inhibition reduced significantly the urinary albumin excretion (perindopril: -292 +/- 205 mg/g creat. vs. placebo: +61 +/- 48 mg/g creat: p < 0.05). From this study it can be concluded that in hypertension with concomitant nephropathy, except renovascular hypertension and hypertension in renal transplant recipients, ACE inhibition by perindopril will not impair kidney function. In the early phase of nephropathy with isolated albuminuria and normal serum creatinine perindopril improves albuminuria and seems to be even of benefit for the kidney.
    Arzneimittel-Forschung 08/1993; 43(8):852-5. · 0.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Plasma concentrations of renin and aldosterone were measured before and 60 min after taking 25 mg captopril in 242 patients with arterial hypertension (124 men, 118 women, aged 51.9 +/- 12.7 years; unilateral aldosterone-producing adrenal adenoma in 8, idiopathic hyperaldosteronism in 16 and essential hypertension in 189). Basal plasma aldosterone levels were twice as high in those with adenoma or hyperaldosteronism (216.9 +/- 99.1 pg/ml and 256 +/- 123 pg/ml, respectively) as in those with essential hypertension (117.7 +/- 115 pg/ml). Basal renin levels in adenoma and idiopathic hyperaldosteronism (1 +/- 0.8 microU/ml and 2.6 +/- 1.9 microU/ml, respectively) were decreased compared with those in essential hypertension (13.1 +/- 14.2 microU/ml). The basal aldosterone/renin ratio was higher in adenoma (436 +/- 370 pg/microU) and idiopathic hyperaldosteronism (615 +/- 950 pg/microU) than in essential hypertension (52.9 +/- 151.3 pg/microU). The sensitivity of this ratio in combination with the aldosterone concentration was 100% for recognizing an adrenal adenoma, its specificity 92.7%. The mean plasma aldosterone level after captopril administration did not change in adenoma patients, but fell to 162 +/- 85 pg/ml (P less than 0.001) in those with idiopathic hyperaldosteronism. These data indicate that the captopril test contributes to distinguishing primary from idiopathic hyperaldosteronism.
    DMW - Deutsche Medizinische Wochenschrift 08/1992; 117(31-32):1175-80. · 0.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Primary hypertension is associated with a lack in renal kallikrein activity which might be one of the reasons for the blood pressure elevation. Some smaller and partially uncontrolled studies suggested that an oral substitution of glandular kallikrein lowers blood pressure by a kinin-mediated vasodilation and increased natriuresis. To test this hypothesis we treated in two studies over 100 patients with untreated mild to moderate primary hypertension (WHO I-II) for 5 resp. 12 weeks in a double blind randomized and placebo controlled manner with 1800 U glandular kallikrein orally. Blood pressure measurements were performed according to the two study designs after 3 and 5 resp. 8 and 12 weeks of treatment sphymomanometrically in the day time course. No significant changes in blood pressure by kallikrein treatment could be observed at any time. Neither renal kallikrein excretion, renin and ACE-activity nor blood glucose concentration in diabetics or non-diabetics was changed. Thus, we could undoubtedly demonstrate that oral applied glandular kallikrein has no effect on primary hypertension.
    Agents and actions. Supplements 02/1992; 38 ( Pt 3):294-303.
  • P Gohlke, P Bünning, G Bönner, T Unger
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    ABSTRACT: In the isolated rabbit thoracic aorta the ACE inhibitor ramiprilat attenuated bradykinin degradation by enzymes localized on vascular endothelial cells as well as on vascular smooth muscle cells by 26% and 32%, respectively. We conclude that the ACE inhibitor can attenuate vascular bradykinin degradation not only by inhibition of endothelial ACE but also by inhibition of other bradykinin degrading enzymes in deeper layers of the vascular wall.
    Agents and actions. Supplements 02/1992; 38 ( Pt 3):178-85.
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    ABSTRACT: Bradykinin is a potent vasodilating and natriuretic peptide, which is potentiated by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. In our investigations we studied the effect of bradykinin on systemic and pulmonary circulation as well as on dorsal hand vein tone. The effects of bradykinin on systemic and pulmonary circulation were tested by injection of bradykinin into the right atrium. Parameters were determined for blood pressure, cardiac output, ECG and mean pressure in pulmonary artery. Heart rate, total peripheral resistance, pulmonary vascular resistance, and pulmonary arteriolar resistance were calculated by these measured parameters. The data raised in our investigations showed clearly that bradykinin reduced blood pressure by reducing total peripheral vascular resistance in a dose-dependent manner. In pulmonary circulation bradykinin develops a direct effect. All circulatory actions of bradykinin are not mediated by prostaglandins, since inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis by indomethacin (100-150 mg) was without any effect. ACE inhibition by ramipril (5 mg) or captopril (50 mg) potentiated all effects of bradykinin about 20- to 50-fold, whereas it decreased angiotensin I effects only about four- to fivefold. These results suggest, that endogenous kinins, if they will be similarly potentiated by ACE inhibition like the exogenous bradykinin in our experiments, might play an important role in the blood pressure lowering effect of ACE inhibitors. Dorsal hand vein tone was reduced by bradykinin too, indicating that kinins can lower cardiac preload by increasing venous blood pooling.
    Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology 02/1992; 20 Suppl 9:S21-7. · 2.38 Impact Factor
  • Deutsche Medizinische Wochenschrift - DEUT MED WOCHENSCHR. 01/1992; 117:1175-1180.
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    ABSTRACT: The efficacy and safety of pravastatin and bezafibrate (in retard form) were compared in a randomised double-blind trial comprising 96 patients (48 men, 48 women; mean age 52.5 [20-68] years) with primary hypercholesterolaemia types IIa and IIb. After four weeks' treatment 6 out of 38 patients (400 mg/d bezafibrate) and 27 out of 58 patients (20 mg/d pravastatin) reached a LDL cholesterol level of 190 mg/dl or less. In the other 31 patients of the pravastatin group the dose was raised to 40 mg/d. During the twelve-week course of pravastatin total cholesterol concentration fell from a mean of 364 +/- 75 mg/dl (initial value) to 281 +/- 61 mg/dl (P less than 0.01), while LDL-cholesterol fell from 288 +/- 81 mg/dl to 206 +/- 64 mg/dl (P less than 0.01) and triglyceride concentration from 168 +/- 83 mg/dl to 148 +/- 80 mg/dl (P less than 0.05). During the twelve-week course of treatment with 400 mg bezafibrate total cholesterol concentration fell from a mean of 363 +/- 91 mg/dl to 325 +/- 73 mg/dl (P less than 0.01), LDL-cholesterol level fell from 284 +/- 88 mg/dl to 242 +/- 70 mg/dl (P less than 0.01) and the triglyceride concentration from 173 +/- 91 mg/dl to 121 +/- 83 mg/dl (P less than 0.01). HDL cholesterol concentration rose by 9% in the bezafibrate group and by 8.4% in the pravastatin group (P less than 0.05). Except in the case of HDL-cholesterol, the falls were significantly different in the two treatment groups: pravastatin was superior to bezafibrate in terms of the reductions in both total and LDL-cholesterol (P less than 0.01 for each). However, bezafibrate produced a greater fall in serum triglycerides (P less than 0.05). No serious side effects were associated with either drug.
    DMW - Deutsche Medizinische Wochenschrift 02/1991; 116(1):7-12. · 0.65 Impact Factor
  • Deutsche Medizinische Wochenschrift - DEUT MED WOCHENSCHR. 01/1991; 116(01):7-12.
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    ABSTRACT: The contribution of endogenous kinins to the acute antihypertensive actions of the converting enzyme inhibitor ramipril was investigated in kinin-deficient Brown Norway rats and in Brown Norway-Hannover rats and Wistar rats as controls. In Brown Norway rats, urinary kinin excretion was measurable but extremely low when compared with control strains. The depressor responses to intra-arterial bradykinin injections 1) were not different between Brown Norway and Brown Norway-Hannover rats, 2) were potentiated by intravenous ramipril (60 micrograms), and 3) were attenuated by intra-arterial infusion of the bradykinin antagonist B4146 (40 micrograms/kg/min) to a similar extent in both strains. In renal hypertensive (two-kidney, one clip) Brown Norway rats, the blood pressure reductions to intravenous bolus injections of ramipril (100 micrograms) were significantly reduced both in extent and duration when compared with hypertensive Brown Norway-Hannover and Wistar rats. Intra-arterial infusion of B4146 (40 micrograms/kg/min) attenuated the depressor response to ramipril in Wistar and Brown Norway-Hannover rats but had no effect in Brown Norway rats. In contrast, all three groups showed similar depressor responses to intravenous infusions of the angiotensin II receptor antagonist saralasin. These responses were not influenced by the bradykinin antagonist. Our data support the hypothesis that kinins are important for the acute antihypertensive actions of converting enzyme inhibitors.
    Hypertension 11/1990; 16(4):429-35. · 6.87 Impact Factor
  • G Bönner
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    ABSTRACT: Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) converts angiotensin-I to angiotensin-II and splits bradykinin into inactive fragments. Inhibition of that enzyme attenuates kinin degradation and potentiates the action of kinins in many pharmacological investigations. Kinins are very potent vasodilating peptides which reduce blood pressure by lowering peripheral vascular resistance. Under experimental conditions in vitro kinins mediated a lot of metabolic and hemodynamic effects of the ACE inhibitors. However, it is still not known whether kinins also play a major role in the blood pressure-lowering effect of ACE inhibitors in vivo. New and highly specific assays are available to determine kinins in blood. But after ACE inhibition no homogeneous changes in circulating kinins are observed by reviewing recently published studies and even inhibition of kallikrein-kinin systems by either antibradykinin-antiserum or aprotinin does not clarify the role of kinins in the hemodynamic responses to ACE inhibition. The newly available bradykinin receptor antagonists inhibit in vitro and in vivo the effect of exogenous bradykinin. They were metabolized like kinins and in higher doses can develop kinin-like activities. After intravenous injection the bradykinin-receptor antagonists induce in vivo an increase in systemic blood pressure and thereby can reduce the blood pressure-lowering effect of ACE inhibitors markedly. However, it is unclear to date whether the bradykinin receptor antagonists developed their blood pressure-enhancing effect only by blocking the kinin-induced vasodilation or by some other stimulating effects on the vasopressor hormones. As long as the mechanisms of the hemodynamic action of the bradykinin antagonists are uncertain, no unequivocal interpretation of the results is possible and the role of kinins in the action of ACE inhibitors in vivo remains still uncertain.
    Clinical physiology and biochemistry 02/1990; 8 Suppl 1:6-15.
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    ABSTRACT: In our studies, we investigated the vasodepressor effects of bradykinin in vivo in normotensive and hypertensive subjects. Bradykinin was injected intravenously and intra-arterially (40-6,050 pM/kg) and was infused intra-arterially (40-6,050 pM/kg/min). The investigations were performed in 21 normotensive and 15 hypertensive patients. Bradykinin injections were performed after the following pharmacological interventions: salt restriction (10 mmol of Na/day), salt loading (300 mmol of Na/day), captopril (50 mg), ramipril (5 mg), lisinopril (20 mg), ketotifen (2 X 1 mg), indomethacin (2 X 50 mg), and propranolol (80 mg). The results show that bradykinin lowers blood pressure in a dose-related manner by marked reduction in peripheral vascular resistance. The blood pressure reduction was strongly correlated with the increase in kinin concentration. This effect of bradykinin appears to be independent of changes in sodium metabolism, beta-adrenoceptors, histamine-1 receptors, and prostaglandins. ACE inhibitors protentiate the blood pressure-lowering effect of bradykinin approximately 20- to 50-fold. In the case of intra-arterial injection of bradykinin, only 2-5% of the intravenously used dose of bradykinin are needed to produce an identical fall in blood pressure. From these experiments, a pulmonary clearance rate of bradykinin of over 95% can be calculated. In the pulmonary arteries, bradykinin has no effect on vascular resistance. In patients suffering from primary or renovascular hypertension, the blood pressure response to bradykinin was enhanced. The bradykinin potentiating effect of the ACE inhibitors was not altered in the hypertensives. In patients suffering from borderline hypertension or primary hyperaldosteronism, bradykinin caused the same blood pressure lowering effect as in the normotensives.
    Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology 02/1990; 15 Suppl 6:S46-56. · 2.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In our studies we investigated the vasodepressor effects of bradykinin in vivo in normotensive and hypertensive subjects. Bradykinin was injected intravenously and intraarterially (40-6050 pM/kg) respectively was infused intraarterially (40-6050 pM/kg/min). The investigations were performed in 21 normotensives and 15 hypertensives. Bradykinin injections were performed after the following pharmacological interventions: salt restriction (10 mmol Na/d), salt loading (300 mmol Na/d), captopril (50 mg), ramipril (5 mg), lisinopril (20 mg), ketotifen (2 x 1 mg), indomethacin (2 x 50 mg), and propranolol (80 mg). The results show that bradykinin lowers blood pressure dose related by marked reduction in peripheral vascular resistance. The blood pressure reduction was strongly correlated with the increase in kinin concentration. This effect of bradykinin appears to be independent of changes in sodium metabolism, of beta adrenoceptors, of histamine-1 receptors, and of prostaglandins. ACE-inhibitors potentiate the blood pressure lowering effect of bradykinin about 20- to 50-fold. In case of an intraarterial injection of bradykinin in only 2-5% o the intravenously used dose of bradykinin are needed to produce an identical fall in blood pressure. From this experiments a pulmonary clearance rate of bradykinin over 95% can be calculated. In the pulmonary arteries bradykinin has no effect on the vascular resistance. In patients suffering from primary or renovascular hypertension the blood pressure response to bradykinin was enhanced. The bradykinin potentiating effect of the ACE-inhibitors was not altered in the hypertensives. In patients suffering from bradykinin hypertension or primary hyperaldosteronism bradykinin developed the same blood pressure lowering effect as in the normotensives.
    Klinische Wochenschrift 12/1989; 67(21):1085-95.
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    ABSTRACT: The relationship between the renin-angiotensin system and the atrial natriuretic peptide and its contributions to the control of sodium balance is not clarified. We therefore studied plasma renin concentration (PRC) and plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in normal subjects during acute and chronic salt loading. Acute intravascular volume expansion by iv infusion of 2000 ml of normal saline resulted in sharp rise in plasma ANP from 122 +/- 24 to 405 +/- 141 pg/ml (p less than 0.05). This increase was only transient with plasma ANP returning to control levels after 240 min. In contrast, reduction in plasma renin concentration was less pronounced, however it was persistent for up to 240 min paralleled by a reduction in plasma protein. Reciprocal changes in ANP plasma levels and PRC were observed during dietary modification in sodium intake. At the end of low sodium diet over 4 days, supine plasma ANP averaged 49 +/- 7 pg/ml and levels increased to 128 +/- 38 pg/ml after 6 days of high sodium intake in 11 healthy subjects (p less than 0.05). In contrast, PRC values averaged 69.8 +/- 19.8 microU/ml and 14.4 +/- 6.5 microU/ml during low and high sodium diet respectively (p less than 0.01). The inverse relation between PRC and ANP was seen after prolonged dietary sodium loading over 15 days in 8 additional subjects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
    Journal of endocrinological investigation 12/1989; 12(10):679-84. · 1.65 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

395 Citations
149.44 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1979–1997
    • University of Cologne
      • • Department of Internal Medicine
      • • Division of Cardiology, Pneumology, Angiology and Intensive Care
      Köln, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 1989–1992
    • MediaPark Klinik Köln
      Köln, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 1977–1984
    • Universität Heidelberg
      • • Department of Clinical Pharmacology
      • • Institute of Pharmacology
      Heidelberg, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany