Mirko Kaluza

Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Jena, Thuringia, Germany

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Publications (8)20.69 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We report a case of a patient with severe aortic stenosis, who underwent replacement of the aortic valve as a Ross procedure. Postoperatively the patient suffered postcardiotomy failure. Despite prolonged reperfusion and other methods of circulatory support, the patient could not be weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Therefore, an Impella intravascular flow pump was implanted, which is technically easy and has good weaning attributes. For implantation, a vascular prosthesis was sewn to the ascending aorta and the microaxial flow pump was placed under echocardiographic guidance across the pulmonary autograft into the left ventricle. With this support, the patient could be weaned from CPB. The report evaluates the Impella microaxial hemopump as a device that is technically easy to implant with no injury to the pulmonary autograft in patients after Ross operation. Surgeons should consider the device as a short-term support in borderline indications.
    The Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeon 10/2007; 55(6):399-400. · 0.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite recent advances in critical care management, the mortality of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains high. The final rescue therapy for patients with severe hypoxia refractory to conventional therapy modalities is the extracorporeal gas exchange. We report the management of three polytraumatized patients with life-threatening injuries, severe blunt thoracic trauma, and consecutive ARDS treating by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Two patients suffered a car accident with severe lung contusion and parenychmal bleeding. Bronchial rupture and mediastinal emphysema was found in one of them. Another patient developed ARDS after attempted suicide with multiple fractures together with blunt abdominal and thoracic trauma. All patients were placed on ECMO and could be rapidly stabilized. They were weaned from ECMO after a mean of 114 +/- 27 hours of support without complications, respectively. Mean duration of ICU stay was 37 +/- 23 days. Quick encouragement of ECMO for the temporary management of gas exchange may increase survival rates in trauma patients with ARDS.
    Journal of Cardiac Surgery 01/2007; 22(3):180-4. · 1.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To effectively perform an anastomosis on a coronary artery under beating heart conditions, the anastomotic site must be cleared of blood to allow visualization for accurate suturing. We describe a simple, cost effective, on-site assembled blower-mister system.
    The Annals of thoracic surgery 10/2006; 82(3):1134-6. · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    The Journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery 01/2006; 130(6):1715-6. · 3.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Closed circuit extracorporeal circulation (CCECC) has been developed to reduce deleterious effects of standard cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). This study compares the effects of CCECC (CORx system), CPB, and off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) on red blood cell damage, coagulation activation, fibrinolysis and cytokine expression. Thirty patients underwent coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Twenty of them were randomized into two groups: CCECC (n = 10), CPB (n = 10). While not randomized, OPCAB (n = 10) served as a separate reference group. CCECC and CPB patients received cardioplegic arrest. Interleukin 6 (IL-6), free hemoglobin (fHb), von Willebrand factor activity (vWf), thrombin-antithrombin-III-complex (TATc), prothrombin fragment 1.2 (F 1+2) and plasmin-antiplasmin complex (PAPc) were assessed preoperatively, perioperatively and 24 h postoperatively. CCECC showed significantly lower red blood cell damage than CPB (fHb: CCECC, 7.1+/- 5.7 micromol/l; CPB, 16.8+/-11.4 micromol/l; P = 0.025; OPCAB, 3.4+/-1.1 micromol/l). Perioperatively, CCECC exhibited significantly lower activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis than CPB, but did not differ from OPCAB (vWf: CCECC, 133+/-52%; CPB, 241+/-128%; P = 0.052; OPCAB, 153+/-58%; TATc: CCECC, 4.7+/-0.9 ng/ml; CPB, 31.1+/-15.8 ng/ml; P < 0.001; OPCAB, 2.4+/-0.6 ng/ml; PAPc: CCECC, 214+/-30 ng/ml; CPB, 897+/-367 ng/ml; P < 0.001; OPCAB, 253+/-98 ng/ml). In contrast, fibrinolysis markers and IL-6 were markedly increased in CCECC postoperatively (PAPc: CCECC, 458+/-98 ng/ml; CPB, 159+/-128 ng/ml; P < 0.001; OPCAB, 262+/-174 ng/ml; IL-6: CCECC, 123.4+/-49.8 pg/dl; CPB, 18.8+/-13.1 pg/dl; P < 0.001; OPCAB, 31.6+/-26.2 pg/dl). CCECC for CABG is associated with a significant reduction of red blood cell damage and activation of coagulation cascades similar to OPCAB when compared with conventional CPB while a delayed fibrinolytic and inflammatory activity was observed. These findings require further investigation to verify the promising concept of CCECC.
    European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery 08/2005; 28(1):127-32. · 2.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Efficacy of in vivo isolated lung perfusion (ILP) with cisplatin could be shown in different rodent tumor models. Despite the use of this alternative therapeutical strategy in very few patients with lung metastases, there are no systematic studies regarding the tolerance of the native lung tissue in large animal models or humans. In a novel ILP pig model, groups with two different concentrations of cisplatin (group CP150: 150 mg/m(2) cisplatin, n=5; group CP300: 300 mg/m(2) cisplatin, n=5) were compared with a control group (n=5) and a Sham group (n=5) concerning the influence on hemodynamic, ventilatory and gas exchange parameters as well as on structural integrity of the lung. In the additional CP300-HT group the potentially cumulative effect of hyperthermia and high-dose cisplatin perfusion was evaluated (300 mg/m(2) cisplatin, 41.5 degrees C, n=5). Following the ILP of the left lung for 40 min, right main bronchus and right pulmonary arteries were clamped and survival as well as lung function parameters were dependent on the previously perfused lung for the 6-h-reperfusion period. Quantification of histological acute lung injury was performed using the score of Chiang. ANOVA, ANOVA with repeated measures and Pearson's correlation estimation were applied for statistical evaluation. All animals survived ILP and the entire reperfusion period. Platinum levels of the perfusate and lung tissue showed a significant correlation with the dose given (P<0.001) but no correlation with the very low plasma levels in all groups (P=0.825). ILP resulted in a slight deterioration of most functional parameters compared to the Sham group. Although there were no differences between the perfusion groups regarding hemodynamic and ventilatory parameters, gas exchange parameters (pO(2)/FiO(2)-index, pCO(2), AADO(2)) demonstrated a trend toward dose-related functional impairment. Histological evaluation confirmed a dose-depending damage of lung tissue (P<0.001, correlation coefficient 0.670). The hyperthermic ILP with high-dose cisplatin led to improved gas exchange parameters and a reduction of morphological lung damage. In vivo ILP with high-dose cisplatin represents a safe procedure in this pig model. Hyperthermic perfusion up to 41.5 degrees C was beneficial to reduce the acute lung injury. The promising results of this study might be used for initiation of clinical trials as an alternative treatment in patients with a very poor prognosis.
    European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery 10/2004; 26(4):800-6. · 2.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Conventional extracorporeal circulation results in an activation of coagulation cascades. Coating of extracorporeal circulation tubes as well as avoidance of shed blood recirculation have been shown to reduce these phenomena. We evaluated a new shed blood separation system (AVANT D 970) utilizing a coated cardiopulmonary bypass tube system (PHISIO). Forty patients (62 +/- 10 years) underwent isolated coronary revascularization. Four groups (n = 10/group) were defined: no extracorporeal circulation, conventional uncoated extracorporeal circulation, uncoated extracorporeal circulation with shed blood separation, and coated extracorporeal circulation with shed blood separation. Thrombin-antithrombin complex and free Hb were analyzed and statistically compared. Conventional extracorporeal circulation exhibited the highest intraoperative activation of coagulation (thrombin-antithrombin complex: extracorporeal circulation, 31.1 +/- 15.8 microg/L; uncoated extracorporeal circulation with shed blood separation, 15.3 +/- 7.8 microg/L; coated extracorporeal circulation with shed blood separation, 8.1 +/- 4.8 microg/L; no extracorporeal circulation, 2.4 +/- 0.6 microg/L; P <.05 extracorporeal circulation vs all others) and red blood cell damage (free Hb: extracorporeal circulation, 16.8 +/- 11.4 micromol/L; uncoated extracorporeal circulation with shed blood separation, 10.3 +/- 3.5 micromol/L; coated extracorporeal circulation with shed blood separation, 6.8 +/- 2.9 micromol/L; no extracorporeal circulation, 3.4 +/- 1.1 micromol/L; P <.05 extracorporeal circulation vs no extracorporeal circulation, coated extracorporeal circulation with shed blood separation). Coated extracorporeal circulation with shed blood separation showed only slight activation and cell trauma, which did not differ significantly from no extracorporeal circulation. Combination of coating and avoidance of shed blood recirculation maintained physiological coagulation levels and markedly reduced red blood cell trauma in extracorporeal circulation procedures. These combined modalities may therefore offer an alternative for off-pump procedures in patients with contraindications for conventional extracorporeal circulation.
    Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 11/2003; 126(5):1504-12. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Intermittent antegrade warm blood cardioplegia (IAWBC) is a simple and cost-effective method of myocardial preservation. However, there are only few prospective trials comparing this type of cardioplegia to established cardioplegic strategies in elective on-pump coronary surgery with respect to myocardial protection and outcome. In a prospective, randomized trial IAWBC (33 degrees C) (n=100) was compared to intermittent antegrade cold (4 degrees C) blood cardioplegia (n=100), regarding clinical outcome and myocardial protection using cardiac troponin-I (cTNI) and creatine kinase MB isoenzyme (CK-MB) measurements to assess ischemia. Preoperative parameters were comparable in both groups. Results demonstrated no differences in-between the groups regarding mortality (2.0% both), incidence of perioperative myocardial infarction (2 versus 3%), need for intra-aortic balloon pump (3 versus 4%), length of ICU stay (2.0+/-2.5 versus 2.1+/-3.0 days) and incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation (41 versus 34%). However, the necessity of defibrillation after cardiac arrest (18 versus 43%, P<0.001) was significantly less frequent and of lower intensity (3.4+/-10.8 versus 10.8+/-20.6 J, P<0.001) in the IAWBC-group. Postoperatively the ischemia markers were significantly lower in the IAWBC-group, cTNI within the first 72 h (from P<0.001 to P=0.013) and even CK-MB within the first 24 h (from P=0.004 to P<0.011). IAWBC is a safe and simple method in elective on-pump coronary artery bypass surgery. Significantly lower ischemic markers suggest an improved myocardial protection compared to cold blood cardioplegia in these patients.
    European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery 03/2003; 23(3):341-6. · 2.67 Impact Factor