Jing Jiang

Guangxi Medical University, Yung-ning, Guangxi Zhuangzu Zizhiqu, China

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Publications (4)18.8 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Serum concentrations of soluble mesothelin-related peptides (SMRP) have been reported to be higher in patients with malignant mesothelioma than in healthy subjects and in patients with non-malignant mesothelioma diseases. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to establish the overall diagnostic accuracy of the measurement of SMRPs for diagnosing malignant mesothelioma. After a systematic review of English language studies, sensitivity, specificity, and other measures of accuracy of serum SMRPs in the diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma were pooled using random-effects models. Summary receiver operating characteristic curves were used to summarize overall test performance. Eleven publications from 12 studies met our inclusion criteria. The summary estimates for SMRPs in the diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma in the studies included were sensitivity 0.64 (95% confidence interval 0.61-0.68), specificity 0.89 (0.88-0.90), positive likelihood ratio 7.10 (4.44-11.35), negative likelihood ratio 0.39 (0.31-0.48), and diagnostic odds ratio 19.35 (10.95-34.17). Serum SMRP determination plays a role in the diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma. The results of SMRP assays should be interpreted in parallel with clinical findings and the results of conventional tests.
    Respiratory medicine 11/2009; 104(1):149-56. · 2.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to explore the presence of the chemokines CCL22 and CCL17 in malignant pleural effusion, and the chemoattractant activity of these chemokines on CD4-positive CD25-positive Foxp3-positive regulatory T cells infiltrating into the pleural space. The concentrations of CCL22 and CCL17 in both pleural effusions and sera from 33 patients with lung cancer were determined. Flow cytometry was done to determine T lymphocyte subsets in cell pellets of pleural effusion. Pleural cells were analyzed for the expression of CCL22 and CCL17. The chemoattractant activity of CCL22 for regulatory T cells in vitro and in vivo was also observed. The concentration of CCL22 in malignant pleural effusion was significantly higher than that in the corresponding serum. Pleural fluid from lung cancer patients was chemotactic for regulatory T cells, and this activity was partly blocked by an anti-CCL22, but not by an anti-CCL17 antibody. Intrapleural administration of CCL22 of patients produced a marked progressive influx of regulatory T cells into pleural space. Compared with serum, CCL22 seemed to be increased in malignant pleural effusion, and could directly induce regulatory T cell infiltration into the pleural space in patients with malignant effusion.
    Clinical Cancer Research 05/2009; 15(7):2231-7. · 7.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Conventional tests are not always helpful in making a diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion (MPE). Many studies have investigated the utility of pleural carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in the early diagnosis of MPE. The present meta-analysis determined the accuracy of CEA measurement in the diagnosis of MPE. A systematic review of English language studies was conducted and data on the accuracy of pleural CEA concentrations in the diagnosis of MPE were pooled using random effects models. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to summarize the overall test performance. Forty-five studies met the inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis. The summary estimates for CEA in the diagnosis of MPE were: sensitivity 0.54 (95% CI: 0.52-0.55), specificity 0.94 (95% CI: 0.93-0.95), positive likelihood ratio 9.52 (95% CI: 6.97-13.01), negative likelihood ratio 0.49 (95% CI: 0.44-0.54) and diagnostic odds ratio 22.5 (95% CI: 15.6-32.5). Analysis of a subset of 11 studies which examined the value of pleural CEA in ruling out a diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma found that the sensitivity and specificity of a CEA level exceeding cut-off values were 0.97 (95% CI: 0.93-0.99) and 0.60 (95% CI: 0.55-0.65), respectively. Measurement of pleural CEA is likely to be a useful diagnostic tool for confirming MPE, and is also helpful in the differential diagnosis between malignant pleural mesothelioma and metastatic lung cancer. The results of CEA assays should be interpreted in parallel with clinical findings and the results of conventional tests.
    Respirology 07/2008; 13(4):518-27. · 2.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Conventional tests are not always helpful in making a diagnosis of tuberculous pleurisy. Many studies have investigated the usefulness of interferon (IFN)-gamma measurements in pleural fluid for the early diagnosis of tuberculous pleurisy. We conducted a metaanalysis to determine the accuracy of IFN-gamma measurements in the diagnosis of tuberculous pleurisy. After a systematic review of English-language studies, sensitivity, specificity, and other measures of accuracy of IFN-gamma concentrations in the diagnosis of pleural effusion were pooled using random-effects models. Summary receiver operating characteristic curves were used to summarize overall test performance. Twenty-two studies met our inclusion criteria. The summary estimates for IFN-gamma in the diagnosis of tuberculous pleurisy in the studies included were as follows: sensitivity, 0.89 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.87 to 0.91); specificity, 0.97 (95% CI, 0.96 to 0.98); positive likelihood ratio, 23.45 (95% CI, 17.31 to 31.78); negative likelihood ratio, 0.11 (95% CI, 0.07 to 0.16); and diagnostic odds ratio, 272.7 (95% CI, 147.5 to 504.2). IFN-gamma determination is a sensitive and specific test for the diagnosis of tuberculous pleurisy. The measurement of IFN-gamma levels in pleural effusions is thus likely to be a useful tool for diagnosing tuberculous pleurisy. The results of IFN-gamma assays should be interpreted in parallel with clinical findings and the results of conventional tests.
    Chest 04/2007; 131(4):1133-41. · 5.85 Impact Factor