Pierre Lefeuvre

University of La Réunion, Saint-Denis, Réunion, Reunion

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Publications (66)182.56 Total impact

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    12/2012; 26:17. DOI:10.5197/j.2044-0588.2012.026.017
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    ABSTRACT: Background Single-stranded (ss) DNA viruses in the family Geminiviridae are proving to be very useful in real-time evolution studies. The high mutation rate of geminiviruses and other ssDNA viruses is somewhat mysterious in that their DNA genomes are replicated in host nuclei by high fidelity host polymerases. Although strand specific mutation biases observed in virus species from the geminivirus genus Mastrevirus indicate that the high mutation rates in viruses in this genus may be due to mutational processes that operate specifically on ssDNA, it is currently unknown whether viruses from other genera display similar strand specific mutation biases. Also, geminivirus genomes frequently recombine with one another and an alternative cause of their high mutation rates could be that the recombination process is either directly mutagenic or produces a selective environment in which the survival of mutants is favoured. To investigate whether there is an association between recombination and increased basal mutation rates or increased degrees of selection favoring the survival of mutations, we compared the mutation dynamics of the MSV-MatA and MSV-VW field isolates of Maize streak virus (MSV; Mastrevirus), with both a laboratory constructed MSV recombinant, and MSV recombinants closely resembling MSV-MatA. To determine whether strand specific mutation biases are a general characteristic of geminivirus evolution we compared mutation spectra arising during these MSV experiments with those arising during similar experiments involving the geminivirus Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (Begomovirus genus). Results Although both the genomic distribution of mutations and the occurrence of various convergent mutations at specific genomic sites indicated that either mutation hotspots or selection for adaptive mutations might elevate observed mutation rates in MSV, we found no association between recombination and mutation rates. Importantly, when comparing the mutation spectra of MSV and TYLCV we observed similar strand specific mutation biases arising predominantly from imbalances in the complementary mutations G → T: C → A. Conclusions While our results suggest that recombination does not strongly influence mutation rates in MSV, they indicate that high geminivirus mutation rates are at least partially attributable to increased susceptibility of all geminivirus genomes to oxidative damage while in a single stranded state.
    BMC Evolutionary Biology 12/2012; 12(1):252. DOI:10.1186/1471-2148-12-252 · 3.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the last 20 years, molecular ecology approaches have proven to be extremely useful to identify and assess factors associated with viral emerging diseases, particularly in economically and socially important tropical crops such as maize (maize streak disease) and cassava (cassava mosaic disease). Molecular ecology approaches were applied in Reunion Island to analyze the epidemic of tomato yellow leaf curl disease, which has been affecting the island since the end of the 1990s. Before the invasive biotype B (currently known as Middle East-Asia Minor 1 cryptic species) of Bemisia tabaci spread across the world, Reunion Island (South West Indian Ocean) only hosted an indigenous biotype of B. tabaci, Ms (currently known as Indian Ocean cryptic species). Wild hybrids between invasive and indigenous species were subsequently characterized over multiple generations. Endosymbiont analysis of the hybrid population indicated that matings were non-random. Similarly, while no indigenous begomoviruses have ever been reported on Reunion Island, the two main strains of one of the most damaging and emerging plant viruses in the world, the Mild and Israel strains of the Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV-Mld and TYLCV-IL), were introduced in 1997 and 2004 respectively. While these introductions extensively modified the agricultural landscape of Reunion Island, they also provided an invaluable opportunity to study the ecological and genetic mechanisms involved in biological invasion and competition.
    Viruses 12/2012; 4(12):3665-88. DOI:10.3390/v4123665 · 3.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is a major food source for over 200 million sub-Saharan Africans. Unfortunately, its cultivation is severely hampered by cassava mosaic disease (CMD). Caused by a complex of bipartite cassava mosaic geminiviruses (CMG) species (Family: Geminivirideae; Genus: Begomovirus) CMD has been widely described throughout Africa and it is apparent that CMG's are expanding their geographical distribution. Determining where and when CMG movements have occurred could help curtail its spread and reveal the ecological and anthropic factors associated with similar viral invasions. We applied Bayesian phylogeographic inference and recombination analyses to available and newly described CMG sequences to reconstruct a plausible history of CMG diversification and migration between Africa and South West Indian Ocean (SWIO) islands. Results The isolation and analysis of 114 DNA-A and 41 DNA-B sequences demonstrated the presence of three CMG species circulating in the Comoros and Seychelles archipelagos (East African cassava mosaic virus, EACMV; East African cassava mosaic Kenya virus, EACMKV; and East African cassava mosaic Cameroon virus, EACMCV). Phylogeographic analyses suggest that CMG’s presence on these SWIO islands is probably the result of at least four independent introduction events from mainland Africa occurring between 1988 and 2009. Amongst the islands of the Comoros archipelago, two major migration pathways were inferred: One from Grande Comore to Mohéli and the second from Mayotte to Anjouan. While only two recombination events characteristic of SWIO islands isolates were identified, numerous re-assortments events were detected between EACMV and EACMKV, which seem to almost freely interchange their genome components. Conclusions Rapid and extensive virus spread within the SWIO islands was demonstrated for three CMG complex species. Strong evolutionary or ecological interaction between CMG species may explain both their propensity to exchange components and the absence of recombination with non-CMG begomoviruses. Our results suggest an important role of anthropic factors in CMGs spread as the principal axes of viral migration correspond with major routes of human movement and commercial trade. Finer-scale temporal analyses of CMGs to precisely scale the relative contributions of human and insect transmission to their movement dynamics will require further extensive sampling in the SWIO region.
    BMC Evolutionary Biology 11/2012; 12(1):228. DOI:10.1186/1471-2148-12-228 · 3.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cassava mosaic geminiviruses (CMGs) are implicated in cassava mosaic disease (CMD), the main constraint to cassava production in Africa. Here, we report the complete nucleotide sequences of the DNA-A and DNA-B of a newly characterized CMG found infecting cassava in Madagascar, for which we propose the tentative name cassava mosaic Madagascar virus. With the exception of two recombinant regions that resembled a CMG, we determined that the non-recombinant part of the DNA-A component is distantly related to the other CMGs. Whereas the DNA-B component possesses one recombinant region originating from an unidentified virus, the rest of the genome was seen to be closely related to members of the species East African cassava mosaic Zanzibar virus (EACMZV). Phylogenetic analysis based on complete genome sequences demonstrated that DNA-A and DNA-B components are outliers related to the clade of EACMV-like viruses and that DNA-A is related to the monopartite tomato leaf curl begomoviruses described in islands in the south-west Indian Ocean.
    Archives of Virology 07/2012; 157(10):2027-30. DOI:10.1007/s00705-012-1399-3 · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: 4 Groupement de Défense des Cultures sous Abri (GDCSA), 98848 Nouméa, Nouvelle-Calédonie; 5 IRD, CBGP, Campus international de Baillarguet, 34988 Montferrier sur Lez, France; 6 Chambre d’Agriculture de la Nouvelle Calédonie, GDS-V, In 2007, severe symptoms of leaf curling and yellowing resembling those of tomato yellow leaf curl disease were observed for the first time on tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum) with a high incidence in fields and greenhouses in the south western region (Nouméa) of the Pacific island of New Caledonia. Tomato samples with leaf curling and yellowing symptoms were collected in the south west and west of New Caledonia and also Ouvéa (Loyalty Islands), respectively, in November and December 2010 (Table 1). Samples were tested for the presence of begomoviruses using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay with a set of degenerate primers designed to amplify genomic regions of the Old World begomovirus DNA-A component (Delatte et al., 2005). PCR products of the expected sizes were obtained for all the five samples from New Caledonia and for four of the six samples from Ouvéa suggesting the presence of an Old World monopartite begomovirus. PCR positive samples were processed further and full-length viral genomes were successfully amplified from six samples (Table 1) by rolling-circle amplification, cloned using XmnI restriction enzyme and sequenced (Shepherd et al., 2008). The complete DNA-A genome sequences obtained (EMBL-GenBank-DDBJ Accession Nos. HE603241-HE603246), showed the highest pairwise sequence identity of 97.6 to 99.4% (BLAST, NCBI) with isolates of the Israel strain of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV-IL) from Spain ([SP:Alm], AJ489258) and Reunion ([RE:SGi:RE4:04], AM409201). The new sequences were aligned with representative sequences of TYLCV strains using MUSCLE (using default settings) in MEGA5 (Tamura et al., 2011). A maximum-likelihood (ML) phylogenetic tree (Fig. 1) was constructed from the full alignment using PHYML with GTR+G4 selected as the best model of sequence evolution by RDP3 (Martin et al., 2010). The ML phylogenetic tree confirmed the relationship of New Caledonia and Ouvéa isolates of TYLCV-IL with the isolates of Spain [SP:Alm] and Reunion [RE:SGi:RE4:04] (Fig. 1). Surprisingly despite the proximity of New Caledonia and Ouvéa to Australia, the New Caledonian TYLCV isolates seem to have a different origin/source of introduction to those recently described from Australia [AU:Bri1:06] and [AU:Bun1:06] (Van Brunschot et al., 2010). This divergence suggests that the epidemic of TYLCD in New Caledonia and Loyalty Islands seems not directly associated with the introduction of TYLCV-IL in Australia where the first symptoms of TYLCD were described in 2006. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the Old World TYLCV implicated in yellow leaf curl disease on tomato in New Caledonia and Loyalty Islands. This description confirms the invasion and the dissemination of the Israel strain, also called "severe" strain, of TYLCV in the Pacific region, and represents a new record of first importance for the regional management of emerging crop diseases and regulatory institutions.
    06/2012; 25025(6-25):2044-588006. DOI:10.5197/j.2044-0588.2012.025.006
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    ABSTRACT: Despite extensive sampling, only one virus belonging to the genus Mastrevirus of the family Geminiviridae, maize streak virus (MSV), has until now been detected in maize with maize streak disease (MSD) symptoms. Here, we report for the first time a second, highly divergent, mastrevirus isolated from two maize plants displaying characteristic MSD-like symptoms, sampled on the South-west Indian Ocean Island, La Réunion. The two isolates shared <57 % genome-wide identity with all other known mastreviruses. We propose calling the new species Maize streak Réunion virus.
    Archives of Virology 04/2012; 157(8):1617-21. DOI:10.1007/s00705-012-1314-y · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cassava mosaic disease (CMD) is a major constraint on cassava cultivation in Africa. The disease is endemic and is caused by seven distinct cassava mosaic geminiviruses (CMGs), some of them including several variants. From cassava leaf samples presenting CMD symptoms collected in Burkina Faso, four DNA-A begomovirus components were cloned and sequenced, showing 99.9% nucleotide identity among them. These isolates are most closely related to African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) but share less than 89% nucleotide identity (taxonomic threshold) with any previously described begomovirus. A DNA-B genomic component, sharing 93% nucleotide identity with DNA-B of ACMV, was also characterized. Since all genomic components have a typical genome organization of Old World bipartite begomoviruses, this new species was provisionally named African cassava mosaic Burkina Faso virus (ACMBFV). Recombination analysis of the new virus demonstrated an interspecies recombinant origin, with major parents related to West African isolates of ACMV, and minor parents related to Tomato leaf curl Cameroon virus and Cotton leaf curl Gezira virus. This is the first report of an ACMV-like recombinant begomovirus arisen by interspecific recombination between bipartite and monopartite African begomoviruses.
    Virology Journal 03/2012; 9:67. DOI:10.1186/1743-422X-9-67 · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: MultiLocus Sequence Analysis (MLSA) and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) were used to measure the genetic relatedness of a comprehensive collection of xanthomonads pathogenic to solaneous hosts to Xanthomonas species. The MLSA scheme was based on partial sequences of four housekeeping genes (atpD, dnaK, efp and gyrB). Globally, MLSA data unambiguously identified strains causing bacterial spot of tomato and pepper at the species level and was consistent with AFLP data. Genetic distances derived from both techniques showed a close relatedness of (i) X. euvesicatoria, X. perforans and X. alfalfae and (ii) X. gardneri and X. cynarae. Maximum likelihood tree topologies derived from each gene portion and the concatenated data set for species in the X. campestris 16S rRNA core (i.e. the species cluster comprising all strains causing bacterial spot of tomato and pepper) were not congruent, consistent with the detection of several putative recombination events in our data sets by several recombination search algorithms. One recombinant region in atpD was identified in most strains of X. euvesicatoria including the type strain.
    Systematic and Applied Microbiology 02/2012; 35(3):183-90. DOI:10.1016/j.syapm.2011.12.005 · 3.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The ancient soilborne plant vascular pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum has evolved and adapted to cause severe damage in an unusually wide range of plants. In order to better describe and understand these adaptations, strains with very similar lifestyles and host specializations are grouped into ecotypes. We used comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to investigate three particular ecotypes in the American phylotype II group: (i) brown rot strains from phylotypes IIB-1 and IIB-2, historically known as race 3 biovar 2 and clonal; (ii) new pathogenic variants from phylotype IIB-4NPB that lack pathogenicity for banana but can infect many other plant species; and (iii) Moko disease-causing strains from phylotypes IIB-3, IIB-4, and IIA-6, historically known as race 2, that cause wilt on banana, plantain, and Heliconia spp. We compared the genomes of 72 R. solanacearum strains, mainly from the three major ecotypes of phylotype II, using a newly developed pangenomic microarray to decipher their population structure and gain clues about the epidemiology of these ecotypes. Strain phylogeny and population structure were reconstructed. The results revealed a phylogeographic structure within brown rot strains, allowing us to distinguish European outbreak strains of Andean and African origins. The pangenomic CGH data also demonstrated that Moko ecotype IIB-4 is phylogenetically distinct from the emerging IIB-4NPB strains. These findings improved our understanding of the epidemiology of important ecotypes in phylotype II and will be useful for evolutionary analyses and the development of new DNA-based diagnostic tools.
    Applied and Environmental Microbiology 01/2012; 78(7):2367-75. DOI:10.1128/AEM.06123-11 · 3.95 Impact Factor
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    12/2011; accepted. DOI:10.5197/j.2044-0588.2011.024.019
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    ABSTRACT: In the 2000s, tobacco plantations on the Comoros Islands were afflicted with a previously unobserved tobacco leaf curl disease characterised by symptoms of severe leaf curling and deformation. Previous molecular characterization of potential viral pathogens revealed a complex of African monopartite tobacco leaf curl begomovirus (TbLCVs). Our molecular investigation allowed the characterization of a new monopartite virus involved in the disease: tomato leaf curl Namakely virus (ToLCNamV). Agroinoculation experiments indicated that TbLCVs and tomato leaf curl viruses (ToLCVs) can infect both tomato and tobacco but that infectivity and symptom expression fluctuate depending on the virus and the plant cultivar combination.
    Archives of Virology 12/2011; 157(3):545-50. DOI:10.1007/s00705-011-1199-1 · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We used multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) on a worldwide collection of the plant pathogenic Ralstonia solanacearum (Betaproteobacteria) to retrace its complex evolutionary history. Using genetic imprints left during R. solanacearum evolution, we were able to delineate distinct evolutionary complex displaying contrasting dynamics. Among the phylotypes already described (I, IIA, IIB, III, IV), eight groups of strains with distinct evolutionary patterns, named clades, were identified. From our recombination analysis, we identified 21 recombination events that occurred within and across these lineages. Although appearing the most divergent and ancestral phylotype, phylotype IV was inferred as a gene donor for the majority of the recombination events that we detected. Whereas this phylotype apparently fuelled the species diversity, ongoing diversification was mainly detected within phylotype I, IIA and III. These three groups presented a recent expanding population structure, a high level of homologous recombination and evidences of long-distance migrations. Factors such as adaptation to a specific host or intense trading of infected crops may have promoted this diversification. Whether R. solanacearum lineages will eventually evolve in distinct species remains an open question. The intensification of cropping and increase of geographical dispersion may favour situations of phylotype sympatry and promote higher exchange of key factors for host adaptation from their common genetic pool.
    The ISME Journal 11/2011; 6(5):961-74. DOI:10.1038/ismej.2011.160 · 9.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Dahlia mosaic disease of the ornamental flowering plant Dahlia is caused by two caulimoviruses, dahlia mosaic virus (DMV) and dahlia common mosaic virus (DCMV). We used a rolling-circle amplification method to amplify, clone and determine for the first time the full genome sequence of a DCMV isolate from New Zealand (DCMV-NZ). Within the 7949-bp circular double-stranded retro-transcribing DCMV-NZ DNA, we identified six putative open reading frames, typical of all genomes in the family Caulimoviridae. The availability of the complete DCMV sequence provides a reference genome against which all others can be compared.
    Archives of Virology 09/2011; 156(12):2297-301. DOI:10.1007/s00705-011-1112-y · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although single stranded (ss) DNA viruses that infect humans and their domesticated animals do not generally cause major diseases, the arthropod borne ssDNA viruses of plants do, and as a result seriously constrain food production in most temperate regions of the world. Besides the well known plant and animal-infecting ssDNA viruses, it has recently become apparent through metagenomic surveys of ssDNA molecules that there also exist large numbers of other diverse ssDNA viruses within almost all terrestrial and aquatic environments. The host ranges of these viruses probably span the tree of life and they are likely to be important components of global ecosystems. Various lines of evidence suggest that a pivotal evolutionary process during the generation of this global ssDNA virus diversity has probably been genetic recombination. High rates of homologous recombination, non-homologous recombination and genome component reassortment are known to occur within and between various different ssDNA virus species and we look here at the various roles that these different types of recombination may play, both in the day-to-day biology, and in the longer term evolution, of these viruses. We specifically focus on the ecological, biochemical and selective factors underlying patterns of genetic exchange detectable amongst the ssDNA viruses and discuss how these should all be considered when assessing the adaptive value of recombination during ssDNA virus evolution.
    Viruses 09/2011; 3(9):1699-738. DOI:10.3390/v3091699 · 3.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genetic recombination is an important process during the evolution of many virus species and occurs particularly frequently amongst begomoviruses in the single stranded DNA virus family, Geminiviridae. As in many other recombining viruses it is apparent that non-random recombination breakpoint distributions observable within begomovirus genomes sampled from nature are the product of variations both in basal recombination rates across genomes and in the over-all viability of different recombinant genomes. Whereas factors influencing basal recombination rates might include local degrees of sequence similarity between recombining genomes, nucleic acid secondary structures and genomic sensitivity to nuclease attack or breakage, the viability of recombinant genomes could be influenced by the degree to which their co-evolved protein-protein and protein-nucleotide and nucleotide-nucleotide interactions are disreputable by recombination. Here we investigate patterns of recombination that occur over 120 day long experimental infections of tomato plants with the begomoviruses Tomato yellow leaf curl virus and Tomato leaf curl Comoros virus. We show that patterns of sequence exchange between these viruses can be extraordinarily complex and present clear evidence that factors such as local degrees of sequence similarity but not genomic secondary structure strongly influence where recombination breakpoints occur. It is also apparent from our experiment that over-all patterns of recombination are strongly influenced by selection against individual recombinants displaying disrupted intra-genomic interactions such as those required for proper protein and nucleic acid folding. Crucially, we find that selection favoring the preservation of co-evolved longer-range protein-protein and protein DNA interactions is so strong that its imprint can even be used to identify the exact sequence tracts involved in these interactions.
    PLoS Pathogens 09/2011; 7(9):e1002203. DOI:10.1371/journal.ppat.1002203 · 8.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Maize streak virus strain A (MSV-A), the causal agent of maize streak disease, is today one of the most serious biotic threats to African food security. Determining where MSV-A originated and how it spread transcontinentally could yield valuable insights into its historical emergence as a crop pathogen. Similarly, determining where the major extant MSV-A lineages arose could identify geographical hot spots of MSV evolution. Here, we use model-based phylogeographic analyses of 353 fully sequenced MSV-A isolates to reconstruct a plausible history of MSV-A movements over the past 150 years. We show that since the probable emergence of MSV-A in southern Africa around 1863, the virus spread transcontinentally at an average rate of 32.5 km/year (95% highest probability density interval, 15.6 to 51.6 km/year). Using distinctive patterns of nucleotide variation caused by 20 unique intra-MSV-A recombination events, we tentatively classified the MSV-A isolates into 24 easily discernible lineages. Despite many of these lineages displaying distinct geographical distributions, it is apparent that almost all have emerged within the past 4 decades from either southern or east-central Africa. Collectively, our results suggest that regular analysis of MSV-A genomes within these diversification hot spots could be used to monitor the emergence of future MSV-A lineages that could affect maize cultivation in Africa.
    Journal of Virology 06/2011; 85(18):9623-36. DOI:10.1128/JVI.00640-11 · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The genus Mastrevirus of the single-stranded DNA virus family Geminiviridae consists of four distinct virus lineages that have been sampled in different parts of the Old World. These include the Panicoideae-infecting African streak viruses (ten described species including the geographical outlier, Digitaria streak virus [DSV] from Vanuatu) and Australian striate mosaic viruses (three described species), the dicotyledonous-plant-infecting mastreviruses (seven described species), and the Eurasian Pooideae-infecting dwarf viruses (three described species). Of all known mastrevirus species, Miscanthus streak virus (MiSV), members of which are found in Japan, is the most divergent and is the only one that lies outside these four main lineages. Besides the full-genome sequences of three very closely related MiSV isolates, nothing is presently known about the diversity of what is potentially a fifth major lineage of mastreviruses. Here, we describe a new MiSV-like virus isolated from the grass Eragrostis minor. Curiously, this virus, which we have tentatively named Eragrostis minor streak virus (EMSV), was discovered in Namibia, Southern Africa—almost as far from Japan as it is possible to get within the Old World. An Eragrostis minor plant displaying chlorotic discontinuous streaks running along the major leaf veins (i.e., streak symptoms characteristic of mastrevirus infections) was sampled in the Caprivi region (S18.06447; E21.83855) of Namibia in November 2009. Circular DNA molecules were amplified from a crude total DNA extract using Phi29 DNA polymerase (TempliPhi TM , GE Healthcare, USA) as
    Archives of Virology 05/2011; 156(7):1299-303. DOI:10.1007/s00705-011-1026-8 · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite having single stranded DNA genomes that are replicated by host DNA polymerases, viruses in the family Geminiviridae are apparently evolving as rapidly as some RNA viruses. The observed substitution rates of geminiviruses in the genera Begomovirus and Mastrevirus are so high that the entire family could conceivably have originated less than a million years ago (MYA). However, the existence of geminivirus related DNA (GRD) integrated within the genomes of various Nicotiana species suggests that the geminiviruses probably originated >10 MYA. Some have even suggested that a distinct New-World (NW) lineage of begomoviruses may have arisen following the separation by continental drift of African and American proto-begomoviruses ∼110 MYA. We evaluate these various geminivirus origin hypotheses using Bayesian coalescent-based approaches to date firstly the Nicotiana GRD integration events, and then the divergence of the NW and Old-World (OW) begomoviruses. Besides rejecting the possibility of a<2 MYA OW-NW begomovirus split, we could also discount that it may have occurred concomitantly with the breakup of Gondwanaland 110 MYA. Although we could only confidently narrow the date of the split down to between 2 and 80 MYA, the most plausible (and best supported) date for the split is between 20 and 30 MYA--a time when global cooling ended the dispersal of temperate species between Asia and North America via the Beringian land bridge.
    PLoS ONE 05/2011; 6(5):e19193. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0019193 · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Yellow vein disease (YVD) is a major problem in pepper in West Africa. Despite the recent implication of a begomovirus in YVD in Mali and in Burkina Faso, the aetiology of the disease remains unclear. Using symptomatic samples from the main vegetable cultivation regions in Burkina Faso, 10 full-length DNA-A-like begomovirus sequences were obtained, each showing 98% nucleotide identity to pepper yellow vein Mali virus (PepYVMV). The host range was determined after construction of a viral clone for agroinfection. Severe symptoms developed in tomato and Nicotiana benthamiana. By contrast, no symptoms developed in either commercial or local pepper cultivars, demonstrating that the aetiology of YVD is not only associated with the presence of PepYVMV.
    Archives of Virology 11/2010; 156(3):483-7. DOI:10.1007/s00705-010-0854-2 · 2.28 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
182.56 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006–2014
    • University of La Réunion
      • Plant Communities and Biological Invaders in Tropical Environment (PVBMT)
      Saint-Denis, Réunion, Reunion
  • 2006–2012
    • Cirad - La recherche agronomique pour le développement
      Montpelhièr, Languedoc-Roussillon, France
  • 2011
    • Maui High-Performance Computing Center
      Dulles, Virginia, United States
  • 2010–2011
    • University of Cape Town
      • Computational Biology Group
      Kaapstad, Western Cape, South Africa