Carlos A Fossati

Universidad Católica de La Plata, Eva Perón, Buenos Aires, Argentina

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Publications (115)347.7 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Food allergies are increasingly common disorders and no therapeutic strategies are yet approved. U-Omp16 is the outer membrane protein of 16 kDa from B. abortus and possesses a mucosal adjuvant property. In this study, we aimed to examine the U-Omp16 capacity to abrogate an allergen-specific Th2 immune response when it is administered as an oral adjuvant in a mouse model of food allergy. Balb/c mice were sensitized with cholera toxin and cow's milk proteins (CMP) by gavage and simultaneously treated with U-Omp16 and CMP. Oral challenge with CMP was performed to evaluate the allergic status of mice. Symptoms, local (small bowel cytokine and transcription factor gene expression) and systemic (specific isotypes and spleen cell-secreted cytokines) parameters, and skin tests were done to evaluate the immune response.: We found that the oral administration of U-Omp16 with CMP during sensitization, dampened the allergic symptoms, with negativization of immediate skin test and increased skin DTH response. Serum specific IgE and IL-5 were inhibited and a Th1 response was promoted (specific IgG2a antibodies and CMP-induced IFN-γ secretion). We found at the mucosal site an inhibition of the gene expression corresponding to IL-13 and Gata-3, with an induction of IFN-γ and T-bet.: These results indicated that the oral administration of U-Omp 16 significantly controlled the allergic response in sensitized mice with a shift of the balance of Th1- and Th2-T cells toward Th1 predominance. These findings suggest that U-Omp 16 may be useful as a Th1-directing adjuvant in an oral vaccine.
    Human vaccines & immunotherapeutics. 05/2014; 10(7).
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    ABSTRACT: Cross-reactivity between soybean allergens and bovine caseins has been previously reported. In this study we aimed to map epitopes of the major soybean allergen Gly m 5 that are co-recognized by casein specific antibodies, and to identify a peptide responsible for the cross-reactivity. Cow's milk protein (CMP)-specific antibodies were used in different immunoassays (immunoblotting, ELISA, ELISA inhibition test) to evaluate the in vitro recognition of soybean proteins (SP). Recombinant Gly m 5 (α), a truncated fragment containing the C-terminal domain (α-T) and peptides of α-T were obtained and epitope mapping was performed with an overlapping peptide assay. Bioinformatics tools were used for epitope prediction by sequence alignment, and for modelling the cross-recognized soy proteins and peptides. The binding of SP to a monoclonal antibody was studied by surface Plasmon resonance (SPR). Finally, the in vivo cross-recognition of SP was assessed in a mouse model of milk allergy. Both α and α-T reacted with the different CMP-specific antibodies. α-T contains IgG and IgE epitopes in several peptides, particularly in the peptide named PA. Besides, we found similar values of association and dissociation constants between the α-casein specific mAb and the different milk and soy components. The food allergy mouse model showed that SP and PA contain the cross-reactive B and T epitopes, which triggered hypersensitivity reactions and a Th2-mediated response on CMP-sensitized mice. Gly m 5 is a cross-reactive soy allergen and the α-T portion of the molecule contains IgG and IgE immunodominant epitopes, confined to PA, a region with enough conformation to be bound by antibodies. These findings contribute to explain the intolerance to SP observed in IgE-mediated CMA patients, primarily not sensitised to SP, as well as it sets the basis to propose a mucosal immunotherapy for milk allergy using this soy peptide.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(1):e82341. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In patients with active brucellosis, the liver is frequently affected by histopathologic lesions, such as granulomas, inflammatory infiltrations, and parenchymal necrosis. Herein, we examine some potential mechanisms of liver damage in brucellosis. We demonstrate that Brucella abortus infection inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) secretion and induces collagen deposition and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 secretion induced by hepatic stellate cells (LX-2). These phenomena depend on transforming growth factor-β1 induction. In contrast, supernatants from B. abortus-infected hepatocytes and monocytes induce MMP-9 secretion and inhibit collagen deposition in hepatic stellate cells. Yet, if LX-2 cells are infected with B. abortus, the capacity of supernatants from B. abortus-infected hepatocytes and monocytes to induce MMP-9 secretion and inhibit collagen deposition is abrogated. These results indicate that depending on the balance between interacting cells and cytokines of the surrounding milieu, the response of LX-2 cells could be turned into an inflammatory or fibrogenic phenotype. Livers from mice infected with B. abortus displayed a fibrogenic phenotype with patches of collagen deposition and transforming growth factor-β1 induction. This study provides potential mechanisms of liver immune response induced by B. abortus-infected hepatic stellate cells. In addition, these results demonstrate that the cross talk of these cells with hepatocytes and macrophages implements a series of interactions that may contribute to explaining some of mechanisms of liver damage observed in human brucellosis.
    American Journal Of Pathology 10/2013; · 4.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Gaucher disease (GD) is caused by mutations in GBA gene that confer a deficient level of activity of glucocerebrosidase (GCase). This deficiency leads to accumulation of the glycolipid glucocerebroside in the lysosomes of cells of monocyte/macrophage system. Type I GD is the mildest form and is characterized by the absence of neuronopathic affection. Bone compromise in Gaucher disease patients is the most disabling aspect of the disease. However, pathophysiological aspects of skeletal alterations are still poorly understood. The homeostasis of bone tissue is maintained by the balanced processes of bone resorption by osteoclasts and formation by osteoblasts. We decided to test weather bone resorption and/or bone formation could be altered by the use of a chemical in vitro murine model of Gaucher disease. We used two sources of cells from monocyte/macrophages lineage isolated from normal mice, splenocytes (S) and peritoneal macrophages (PM), and were exposed to CBE, the inhibitor of GCase (S-CBE and PM-CBE, respectively). Addition of both conditioned media (CM) from S-CBE and PM-CBE induced the differentiation of osteoclasts precursors from bone marrow to mature and functional osteoclasts. TNF-α could be one of the factors responsible for this effect. On the other side, addition of CM to an osteoblast cell culture resulted in a reduction in expression of alkaline phosphatase and mineralization process. In conclusion, these results suggest implication of changes in both bone formation and bone resorption and are consistent with the idea that both sides of the homeostatic balance are affected in GD.
    Gene 09/2013; · 2.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The immunomodulatory power of heat-killed Gordonia bronchialis was studied on gut epithelial cells activated with pro-inflammatory stimuli (flagellin, TNF-α or IL-1β). Light emission of luciferase-transfected epithelial cells and mRNA expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, CCL20, IL-8 and MCP-1 were measured. NF-κB activation was assessed by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting, and induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was evaluated. In vivo inhibitory properties of G. bronchialis were studied with ligated intestinal loop assay and in a mouse model of food allergy. G. bronchialis promoted the down-regulation of the expression of CCL20 and IL-1β on activated epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. A concomitant blocking of nuclear p65 translocation with increased production of ROS was found. In vivo experiments confirmed the inhibition of CCL20 expression and the suppression of IgE sensitization and hypersensitivity symptoms in the food allergy mouse model. In conclusion, heat-killed G. bronchialis inhibited the activation of NF-κB pathway in human epithelial cells, and suppressed the expression of CCL20. These results indicate that G. bronchialis may be used to modulate the initial steps of innate immune activation, which further suppress the allergic sensitization. This approach may be exploited as a therapy for intestinal inflammation.
    Innate Immunity 09/2013; · 2.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Arthritis is one of the most common complications of human active brucellosis but its pathogenic mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. In this manuscript, we described the role of synoviocytes in the pathogenesis of brucellar arthritis. Our results indicate that B. abortus infection inhibited synoviocyte apoptosis through the upregulation of anti-apoptotic factors (cIAP-2, Clusterin, Livin and P21/CIP/CDNK1A). In contrast, infection did not change the expression of proteins that have been involved in apoptosis induction such as Bad, Bax, cleaved Pro-caspase 3, CytC, TRAIL, among others; or their expression was reduced as occurs in the case of P-p53(S15). In addition, B. abortus infection induced up-regulation of adhesion molecules (CD54 and CD106), and the adhesion of monocytes and neutrophils to infected-synoviocytes was significantly higher than to uninfected cells. Despite this increased adhesion, B. abortus-infected synoviocytes were able to inhibit apoptosis induced by supernatants from B. abortus-infected monocytes and neutrophils. Moreover, B. abortus infection increased soluble and membrane RANKL expression in synoviocytes that further induced monocytes to undergo osteoclastogenesis. The results presented here are shedding light on how the interactions of B. abortus with synovial fibroblasts may have an important role in the pathogenesis of brucellar arthritis.
    Infection and immunity 03/2013; · 4.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal disorder (LD) due to deficiency of the enzyme α-galactosidase A (αGal), which leads to the accumulation of neutral glycosphingolipids, mainly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3). Several mechanisms contribute to the diverse physiopathological alterations observed in this disease, and it has been suggested that an underlying proinflammatory state could play a significant role. The aim of this study is to investigate the presence of a proinflammatory state in the different subsets of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and to understand the mechanisms that contribute to its onset and perpetuation. We have shown that cultured PBMC from Fabry patients present a higher proinflammatory cytokine expression and production. Moreover, we determined that among PBMC, dendritic cells and monocytes present a basal proinflammatory cytokine production profile, which is further exacerbated with an inflammatory stimulus. Finally we established that normal, monocyte-derived dendritic cells and macrophages display the same proinflammatory profile when cultured in the presence of Gb3 and an inhibitor of αGal. Furthermore, this effect can be abolished using a TLR4 blocking antibody, indicating that TLR4 is necessary in the process. In summary, our results demonstrate the presence of a proinflammatory state involving two key subsets of innate immunity, and provide direct evidence of Gb3 having a proinflammatory role, likely mediated by TLR4, a finding that could help in the understanding of the underlying causes of the inflammatory pathogenesis of Fabry disease.
    Molecular Genetics and Metabolism 02/2013; · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The discovery of novel mucosal adjuvants will help to develop new formulations to control infectious and allergic diseases. In this work we demonstrate that U-Omp16 from Brucella spp. delivered by the nasal route (i.n.) induced an inflammatory immune response in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissues. Nasal co-administration of U-Omp16 with the model antigen (Ag) ovalbumin (OVA) increased the amount of Ag in lung tissues and induced OVA-specific systemic IgG and T helper (Th) 1 immune responses. The usefulness of U-Omp16 was also assessed in a mouse model of food allergy. U-Omp16 i.n. administration during sensitization ameliorated the hypersensitivity responses of sensitized mice upon oral exposure to Cow's Milk Protein (CMP), decreased clinical signs, reduced anti-CMP IgE serum antibodies and modulated the Th2 response in favor of Th1 immunity. Thus, U-Omp16 could be used as a broad Th1 mucosal adjuvant for different Ag formulations.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(7):e69438. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Gaucher disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of glucocerebrosidase enzymatic activity leading to accumulation of its substrate glucocerebrosidase mainly in macrophages. Skeletal disorder of Gaucher disease is the major cause of morbidity and is highly refractory to enzyme replacement therapy. However, pathological mechanisms of bone alterations in Gaucher disease are still poorly understood. We hypothesized that cellular alteration in Gaucher disease produces a proinflammatory milieu leading to bone destruction through enhancement of monocyte differentiation to osteoclasts and osteoclasts resorption activity. Against this background we decided to investigate in an in vitro chemical model of Gaucher disease, the capacity of secreted soluble mediators to induce osteoclastogenesis, and the mechanism responsible for this phenomena. We demonstrated that soluble factors produced by CBE-treated PBMC induced differentiation of osteoclasts precursors into mature and active osteoclasts that express chitotriosidase and secrete proinflammatory cytokines. We also showed a role of TNF-α in promoting osteoclastogenesis in Gaucher disease chemical model. To analyze the biological relevance of T cells in osteoclastogenesis of Gaucher disease, we investigated this process in T cell-depleted PBMC cultures. The findings suggest that T cells play a role in osteoclast formation in Gaucher disease. In conclusion, our data suggests that in vitro GCASE deficiency, along with concomitant glucosylceramide accumulation, generates a state of osteoclastogenesis mediated in part by pro-resorptive cytokines, especially TNF-α. Moreover, T cells are involved in osteoclastogenesis in Gaucher disease chemical model.
    Gene 11/2012; 509(1):51-9. · 2.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The pathogenic mechanisms of bone loss caused by Brucella species have not been completely deciphered. Although T lymphocytes (LTs) are considered important to control infection, the mechanism of Brucella-induced T-cell responses to immunopathological features is not known. We present in vitro and in vivo evidence showing that Brucella abortus-induced inflammatory response leads to the activation of LTs, which further promote osteoclastogenesis. Pre-activated murine LTs treated with culture supernatant from macrophages infected with B. abortus induced bone marrow-derived monocytes (BMMs) to undergo osteoclastogenesis. Furthermore, osteoclastogenesis was mediated by CD4(+) T cells. Although B. abortus-activated T cells actively secreted the pro-osteoclastogenic cytokines RANKL and IL-17, osteoclastogenesis depended on IL-17, because osteoclast generation induced by Brucella-activated T cells was completely abrogated when these cells were cultured with BMMs from IL-17 receptor knockout mice. Neutralization experiments indicated that IL-6, generated by Brucella infection, induced the production of pro-osteoclastogenic IL-17 from LTs. By using BMMs from tumor necrosis factor receptor p55 knockout mice, we also demonstrated that IL-17 indirectly induced osteoclastogenesis through the induction of tumor necrosis factor-α from osteoclast precursors. Finally, extensive and widespread osteoclastogenesis was observed in the knee joints of mice injected with Brucella-activated T cells. Our results indicate that activated T cells, elicited by B. abortus-infected macrophages and influenced by the inflammatory milieu, promote the generation of osteoclasts, leading to bone loss.
    American Journal Of Pathology 09/2012; 181(3):887-96. · 4.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In spite of the frequent acquisition of Brucella infection by the oral route in humans, the interaction of the bacterium with cells of the intestinal mucosa has been poorly studied. Here, we show that different Brucella species can invade human colonic epithelial cell lines (Caco-2 and HT-29), in which only smooth species can replicate efficiently. Infection with smooth strains did not produce a significant cytotoxicity, while the rough strain RB51 was more cytotoxic. Infection of Caco-2 cells or HT-29 cells with either smooth or rough strains of Brucella did not result in an increased secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1, IL-10 or TGF-β as compared with uninfected controls, whereas all the infections induced the secretion of IL-8 and CCL20 by both cell types. The MCP-1 response to flagellin from Salmonella typhimurium was similar in Brucella-infected or uninfected cells, ruling out a bacterial inhibitory mechanism as a reason for the weak proinflammatory response. Infection did not modify ICAM-1 expression levels in Caco-2 cells, but increased them in HT-29 cells. These results suggest that Brucella induces only a weak proinflammatory response in gut epithelial cells, but produces a significant CCL20 secretion. The latter may be important for bacterial dissemination given the known ability of Brucella to survive in dendritic cells.
    FEMS Immunology & Medical Microbiology 05/2012; 66(1):45-57. · 2.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Osteoarticular brucellosis is the most common presentation of the active disease in humans. Loss of bone is a serious complication of localized bacterial infection of bones or the adjacent tissue, and brucellosis proved not to be the exception. The skeleton is a dynamic organ system which is constantly remodeled. Osteoblasts are responsible for the deposition of bone matrix and are thought to facilitate the calcification and mineralization of the bone matrix, and their function could be altered under infectious conditions. In this article, we describe immune mechanisms whereby Brucella abortus may invade and replicate within osteoblasts, inducing apoptosis, inhibiting mineral and organic matrix deposition, and inducing upregulation of RANKL expression. Additionally, all of these mechanisms contributed in different ways to bone loss. These processes implicate the activation of signaling pathways (mitogen-activated protein kinases [MAPK] and caspases) involved in cytokine secretion, expression of activating molecules, and cell death of osteoblasts. In addition, considering the relevance of macrophages in intracellular Brucella survival and proinflammatory cytokine secretion in response to infection, we also investigated the role of these cells as modulators of osteoblast survival, differentiation, and function. We demonstrated that supernatants from B. abortus-infected macrophages may also mediate osteoblast apoptosis and inhibit osteoblast function in a process that is dependent on the presence of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). These results indicate that B. abortus may directly and indirectly harm osteoblast function, contributing to the bone and joint destruction observed in patients with osteoarticular complications of brucellosis.
    Infection and immunity 04/2012; 80(7):2333-45. · 4.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cow's milk allergy (CMA) is an important problem worldwide and the development of an in vivo system to study new immunotherapeutic strategies is of interest. Intolerance to soybean formula has been described in CMA patients, but it is not fully understood. In this work, we used a food allergy model in BALB/c mice to study the cross-reactivity between cow's milk protein (CMP) and soy proteins (SP). Mice were orally sensitized with cholera toxin and CMP, and then challenged with CMP or SP to induce allergy. Elicited symptoms, plasma histamine, humoral and cellular immune response were analyzed. Th1- and Th2-associated cytokines and transcription factors were assessed at mucosal sites and in splenocytes. Cutaneous tests were also performed. We found that the immediate symptoms elicited in CMP-sensitized mice orally challenged with SP were consistent with a plasma histamine increase. The serum levels of CMP-specific IgE and IgG1 antibodies were increased. These antibodies also recognized soy proteins. Splenocytes and mesenteric lymph node cells incubated with CMP or SP secreted IL-5 and IL-13. mRNA expression of Th2-associated genes (IL-5, IL-13, and GATA-3) was upregulated in mucosal samples. In addition, sensitized animals exhibited positive cutaneous tests after the injection of CMP or SP. We demonstrate that CMP-sensitized mice, without previous exposure to soy proteins, elicited hypersensitivity signs immediately after the oral administration of SP, suggesting that the immunochemical cross-reactivity might be clinically relevant. This model may provide an approach to further characterize cross-allergenicity phenomena and develop new immunotherapeutic treatments for allergic patients.
    International Archives of Allergy and Immunology 04/2012; 158(4):335-46. · 2.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by some Gram-negative bacteria have been shown to exert immunomodulatory effects that favor the establishment of the infection. The aim of the present study was to assess the interaction of OMVs from Brucella abortus with human epithelial cells (HeLa) and monocytes (THP-1), and the potential immunomodulatory effects they may exert. Using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, FITC-labeled OMVs were shown to be internalized by both cell types. Internalization was shown to be partially mediated by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Pretreatment of THP-1 cells with Brucella OMVs inhibited some cytokine responses (TNF-α and IL-8) to E. coli LPS, Pam3Cys or flagellin (TLR4, TLR2 and TLR5 agonists, respectively). Similarly, pretreatment with Brucella OMVs inhibited the cytokine response of THP-1 cells to B. abortus infection. Treatment of THP-1 cells with OMVs during IFN-γ stimulation reduced significantly the inducing effect of this cytokine on MHC-II expression. OMVs induced a dose-dependent increase of ICAM-1 expression on THP-1 cells and an increased adhesion of these cells to human endothelial cells. The addition of OMVs to THP-1 cultures before the incubation with live B. abortus resulted in increased numbers of adhered and internalized bacteria as compared to cells not treated with OMVs. Overall, these results suggest that OMVs from B. abortus exert cellular effects that promote the internalization of these bacteria by human monocytes, but also downregulate the innate immune response of these cells to Brucella infection. These effects may favor the persistence of Brucella within host cells.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(11):e50214. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Osteoarticular complications are common in human brucellosis, but the pathogenic mechanisms involved are largely unknown. In this manuscript, we described an immune mechanism for inflammatory bone loss in response to infection by Brucella abortus. We established a requirement for MyD88 and TLR2 in TNF-α-elicited osteoclastogenesis in response to B. abortus infection. CS from macrophages infected with B. abortus induced BMM to undergo osteoclastogenesis. Although B. abortus-infected macrophages actively secreted IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, osteoclastogenesis depended on TNF-α, as CS from B. abortus-infected macrophages failed to induce osteoclastogenesis in BMM from TNFRp55⁻/⁻ mice. CS from B. abortus-stimulated MyD88⁻/⁻ and TLR2⁻/⁻ macrophages failed to express TNF-α, and these CS induced no osteoclast formation compared with that of the WT or TLR4⁻/⁻ macrophages. Omp19, a B. abortus lipoprotein model, recapitulated the cytokine production and subsequent osteoclastogenesis induced by the whole bacterium. All phenomena were corroborated using human monocytes, indicating that this mechanism could play a role in human osteoarticular brucellosis. Our results indicate that B. abortus, through its lipoproteins, may be involved in bone resorption through the pathological induction of osteoclastogenesis.
    Journal of leukocyte biology 11/2011; 91(2):285-98. · 4.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Arthritis is one of the most common complications of human brucellosis, but its pathogenic mechanisms have not been elucidated. Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) are known to be central mediators of joint damage in inflammatory arthritides through the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that degrade collagen and of cytokines and chemokines that mediate the recruitment and activation of leukocytes. In this study we show that Brucella abortus infects and replicates in human FLS (SW982 cell line) in vitro and that infection results in the production of MMP-2 and proinflammatory mediators (interleukin-6 [IL-6], IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 [MCP-1], and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF]). Culture supernatants from Brucella-infected FLS induced the migration of monocytes and neutrophils in vitro and also induced these cells to secrete MMP-9 in a GM-CSF- and IL-6-dependent fashion, respectively. Reciprocally, culture supernatants from Brucella-infected monocytes and neutrophils induced FLS to produce MMP-2 in a tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-dependent fashion. The secretion of proinflammatory mediators and MMP-2 by FLS did not depend on bacterial viability, since it was also induced by heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) and by a model Brucella lipoprotein (L-Omp19). These responses were mediated by the recognition of B. abortus antigens through Toll-like receptor 2. The intra-articular injection of HKBA or L-Omp19 into the knee joint of mice resulted in the local induction of the proinflammatory mediators MMP-2 and MMP-9 and in the generation of a mixed inflammatory infiltrate. These results suggest that FLS, and phagocytes recruited by them to the infection focus, may be involved in joint damage during brucellar arthritis through the production of MMPs and proinflammatory mediators.
    Infection and immunity 09/2011; 79(9):3619-32. · 4.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder (LSD) due to deficiency of the enzyme α-galactosidase A, resulting in intracellular deposition of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3). Accumulation of Gb3 is probably related to tissue and organ dysfunctions. Diverse pathological mechanisms are elicited in LSDs, giving together the phenotypic expression of each disease. The purpose of the present study is to investigate if apoptosis could play a role in Fabry disease pathogenesis and to understand the mechanisms involved in the proapoptotic state. We have demonstrated that Fabry disease peripheral blood mononuclear cells display a higher apoptotic state, which is reduced by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), and is mediated, at least in part, by activation of the intrinsic pathway of caspases. We could rule out the implication of "unfolded protein response-ER stress" in this apoptotic process. To further confirm the suggestion that Gb3 is associated to apoptotic cell death, we treated normal cells with Gb3 at concentrations found in Fabry patients. Addition of Gb3 resulted in a dose-dependent induction of apoptosis involving the intrinsic pathway. In summary, PBMC from Fabry patients display a higher apoptotic state, which could be mainly related to elevated Gb3.
    Molecular Genetics and Metabolism 06/2011; 104(3):319-24. · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although vascular pathologies such as vasculitis, endocarditis and mycotic aneurysms have been described in brucellosis patients, the interaction of Brucella with the endothelium has not been characterized. In this study we show that Brucella abortus and Brucella suis can infect and replicate in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and in the microvascular endothelial cell line HMEC-1. Infection led to an increased production of IL-8, MCP-1 and IL-6 in HUVEC and HMEC-1 cells, and an increased expression of adhesion molecules (CD54 in both cells, CD106 and CD62E in HUVEC). Experiments with purified antigens from the bacterial outer membrane revealed that lipoproteins (Omp19) but not lipopolysaccharide mediate these proinflammatory responses. Infection of polarized HMEC-1 cells resulted in an increased capacity of these cells to promote the transmigration of neutrophils from the apical to the basolateral side of the monolayer, and the same phenomenon was observed when the cells were stimulated with live bacteria from the basolateral side. Overall, these results suggest that Brucella spp. can infect and survive within endothelial cells, and can induce a proinflammatory response that might be involved in the vascular manifestations of brucellosis.
    Microbes and Infection 05/2011; 13(10):852-61. · 2.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A case of prepatellar bursitis in a man with chronic brucellosis is presented. Brucella abortus biotype 1 was isolated from the abundant yellowish fluid obtained from the bursa. Clinical and epidemiological data did not suggest a direct inoculation of the agent in the bursa. However, the patient mentioned occasional local trauma due to recreational sports, which may have constituted a predisposing factor. As determined by ELISA, there were higher levels of IgG against Brucella LPS and cytosolic proteins detected in the patient's bursal synovial fluid when compared with serum. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines (tumour necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1 beta, gamma interferon, interleukin 8 and MCP-1) were higher than in synovial fluids obtained from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and a patient with septic arthritis, and a zymographic analysis revealed a gelatinase of about 92 kDa. These findings indicate that it may be possible to diagnose brucellar bursitis by measuring specific antibodies in the bursal synovial fluid. In addition, our findings suggest a role of increased local levels of proinflammatory cytokines and gelatinases in the inflammatory manifestations of brucellar bursitis.
    Journal of Medical Microbiology 12/2010; 59(Pt 12):1514-8. · 2.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Osteoarticular complications are common in human brucellosis, but the pathogenic mechanisms involved are largely unknown. Since matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved in joint and bone damage in inflammatory and infectious diseases, we investigated the production of MMPs by human osteoblasts and monocytes, either upon Brucella abortus infection or upon reciprocal stimulation with factors produced by each infected cell type. B. abortus infection of the normal human osteoblastic cell line hFOB 1.19 triggered a significant release of MMP-2, which was mediated in part by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) acting on these same cells. Supernatants from infected osteoblasts exhibited increased levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and induced the migration of human monocytes (THP-1 cell line). Infection with B. abortus induced a high MMP-9 secretion in monocytes, which was also induced by heat-killed B. abortus and by the Omp19 lipoprotein from B. abortus. These effects were mediated by Toll-like receptor 2 and by the action of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) produced by these same cells. Supernatants from B. abortus-infected monocytes induced MMP-2 secretion in uninfected osteoblasts, and this effect was mediated by TNF-α. Similarly, supernatants from infected osteoblasts induced MMP-9 secretion in uninfected monocytes. This effect was mediated by GM-CSF, which induced TNF-α production by monocytes, which in turn induced MMP-9 in these cells. These results suggest that MMPs could be potentially involved in the tissue damage observed in osteoarticular brucellosis.
    Infection and immunity 10/2010; 79(1):192-202. · 4.21 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
347.70 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013
    • Universidad Católica de La Plata
      Eva Perón, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • 1993–2013
    • National University of La Plata
      • • Departamento de Ciencias Biológicas (Facultad de Ciencias Exactas)
      • • Facultad de Ciencias Exactas
      • • Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo en Criotecnología de Alimentos (CIDCA)
      La Plata, Provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • 1990–2012
    • University of Buenos Aires
      • • Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry
      • • Faculty of Medicine
      Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires F.D., Argentina
  • 1989–2012
    • Instituto de Estudios de la Inmunidad Humoral
      Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires F.D., Argentina
  • 1993–2010
    • Hospital de Infecciosas "F. Muñiz"
      Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires F.D., Argentina
  • 2007–2009
    • National University of Central Buenos Aires
      • • Sanidad Animal y Medicina Preventiva (SAMP)
      • • Facultad de Ciencias Veterinarias
      Tandil, Provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina
    • Hospital de Niños Ricardo Gutièrrez
      Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires F.D., Argentina
  • 1996–2002
    • Facultad Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales - Argentina
      Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires F.D., Argentina
    • National Scientific and Technical Research Council
      • IDEHU Instituto de Estudios de la Inmunidad Humoral "Prof. R.A. Margni"
      Mendoza, Provincia de Mendoza, Argentina
  • 1998
    • Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo en Tecnología de Pinturas
      Eva Perón, Buenos Aires, Argentina