P Vermersch

University of Lille Nord de France, Lille, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France

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Publications (353)1362.55 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Inherited white matter diseases are rare and heterogeneous disorders usually encountered in infancy. Adult-onset forms are increasingly recognized. Our objectives were to determine relative frequencies of genetic leukoencephalopathies in a cohort of adult-onset patients and to evaluate the effectiveness of a systematic diagnostic approach. Inclusion criteria of this retrospective study were: (i) symmetrical involvement of white matter on the first available brain MRI; (ii) age of onset above 16 years. Patients with acquired diseases were excluded. Magnetic resonance imaging analysis identified three groups (vascular, cavitary and non-vascular/non-cavitary) in which distinct genetic and/or biochemical testing were realized. One hundred and fifty-four patients (male/female = 60/94) with adult-onset leukoencephalopathies were identified. Mean age of onset was 38.6 years. In the vascular group, 41/55 patients (75%) finally had a diagnosis [including CADASIL (cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, n = 32) and COL4A1 mutation, n = 7]. In the cavitary group, 13/17 (76%) patients had a diagnosis of EIF2B-related disorder. In the third group (n = 82), a systematic biological screening allowed a diagnosis in 23 patients (28%) and oriented direct genetic screening identified 21 additional diseases (25.6%). Adult-onset genetic leukoencephalopathies are a rare but probably underestimated entity. Our study confirms the use of a magnetic resonance imaging-based classification with a final diagnosis rate of 64% (98/154) cases. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Brain : a journal of neurology. 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background and purposeSelective agonists of sigma-1 (σ1) protein are generally reported to protect against neuronal damage and modulate oligodendrocyte differentiation. Human and rodent lymphocytes possess saturable, high-affinity binding sites for σ ligands and potential immunomodulatory properties have been described for σ1 compounds. Experimental auto-immune encephalomyelitis (EAE) has unequivocal value as a model of the inflammatory aspects of multiple sclerosis (MS). Here, we have assessed the role of σ1 agonist containing the tetrahydroisoquinoleine-hydantoin structure in EAE.Experimental approachEAE was induced in SJL/J female mice by active immunization with myelin proteolipid protein (PLP)139-151 peptide. The σ1 agonist was injected i.p. at immunization time (D0). Disease severity was assessed clinically and by histopathological evaluation of the central nervous system (CNS). Phenotyping of B-cell subsets and Tregs were performed by flow cytometry in spleen and cervical lymph nodes.Key resultsProphylactic treatment of EAE mice with σ1 agonist prevented mononuclear cell accumulation and demyelination in brain and spinal cord and increased T2 B cells and Tregs, resulting in an overall reduction in the clinical progression of EAE.Conclusions and implicationsσ1 agonist containing the tetrahydroisoquinoleine-hydantoin structure dampened the magnitude of inflammation in EAE. This was associated with the increase in the proportion of B-cell subsets and Tregs with potential immunoregulatory functions. Targeting σ1 might thus provide new therapeutic opportunities for MS.
    British Journal of Pharmacology 12/2014; · 5.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to dissociate age and duration of illness effects on cognitive impairment of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Cognitive impairment among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is well known. However, few studies were devoted to assess the respective role of disease duration and age on cognitive functions in MS patients. Therefore, two studies were carried out on relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS) patients using some tests of the BCcogSEP - a French test battery evaluating cognitive functions in MS. The cognitive deficits of RR-MS patients aged 50 years and over and whose symptoms had been present for more than 20 years were more severe than those of MS patients with a shorter illness duration (less than 10 years) or matched-age control participants. The more impaired cognitive functions were information-processing speed, episodic memory, verbal fluency and attention. On the other hand, cognitive performances of young RR-MS patients were similar to those of older RR-MS patients when all patients had the same illness duration (8 years in this study). Older patients even achieved better performance than younger ones on verbal fluency. This can be partly explained by the theory of cognitive reserve, as reported in previous cognitive aging studies. In RR-MS patients, the influence of illness duration seems to be a predominant factor in the development of cognitive impairment.
    Geriatrie et psychologie neuropsychiatrie du vieillissement 09/2014; 12(3):331-338. · 0.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We compared the three-dimensional (3D) double inversion recovery (DIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence with the coronal two-dimensional (2D) short tau inversion recovery (STIR) fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) for the detection of optic nerve signal abnormality in patients with optic neuritis (ON).
    European Radiology 08/2014; · 4.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT) permits quantification of retinal layer atrophy relevant to assessment of neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis (MS). Measurement artefacts may limit the use of OCT to MS research.
    Multiple Sclerosis 06/2014; · 4.86 Impact Factor
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    Revue Neurologique 06/2014; · 0.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BackgroundEconomic costs related to treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) must be justified by health state, quality of life (QOL) and social participation improvement. This study aims to describe correlations between social participation, economic costs, utility and MS-specific QOL in a sample of patients with MS (pwMS).MethodsWe interviewed 42 pwMS receiving natalizumab and collected clinical data, direct medical costs, productivity loss, utility (EQ5D-VAS), MS-specific QOL (SEP-59), social participation with the Impact on Participation and Autonomy questionnaire (IPA). We performed descriptive and correlation analyses.Results41 pwMS, with a mean Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score of 4.0, completed questionnaires. Mean annual global cost per patient was 68448 +/-33374 Euros and increased with EDSS (r = 0.644), utility (r = -0.456) and IPA (r = 0.519-0.671) worsening. Mean utility was 0.52 +/- 0.28. Correlations between IPA and QOL (EQ5D-VAS or SEP-59) were observed (r = -0.53 to -0.78). Association between QOL and EDSS was smaller (EQ5D-VAS) or absent. Productivity losses were poorly correlated to EDSS (r = 0.375).ConclusionModerate to strong correlations of social participation with clinical status (EDSS), QOL, utility and economic costs encourage exploring better these links in larger cohorts. The stronger correlation between social participation and QOL than between EDSS and QOL needs to be confirmed.
    BMC Neurology 05/2014; 14(1):115. · 2.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To report the 5-year risk and to identify risk factors for the development of a seminal acute or progressive clinical event in a multi-national cohort of asymptomatic subjects meeting 2009 RIS Criteria. Retrospectively identified RIS subjects from 22 databases within 5 countries were evaluated. Time to the first clinical event related to demyelination (acute or 12-month progression of neurological deficits) was compared across different groups by univariate and multivariate analyses utilizing a Cox regression model. Data were available in 451 RIS subjects (F: 354 (78.5%)). The mean age at from the time of the first brain MRI revealing anomalies suggestive of MS was 37.2 years (y) (median: 37.1 y, range: 11-74 y) with mean clinical follow-up time of 4.4 y (median: 2.8 y, range: 0.01-21.1 y). Clinical events were identified in 34% (standard error = 3%) of individuals within a 5-year period from the first brain MRI study. Of those who developed symptoms, 9.6% fulfilled criteria for primary progressive MS. In the multivariate model, age [hazard ratio (HR): 0.98 (95% CI: 0.96-0.99); p = 0.03], sex (male) [HR: 1.93 (1.24-2.99); p = 0.004], and lesions within the cervical or thoracic spinal cord [HR: 3.08 (2.06-4.62); p = <0.001] were identified as significant predictors for the development of a first clinical event. These data provide supportive evidence that a meaningful number of RIS subjects evolve to a first clinical symptom. An age <37 y, male sex, and spinal cord involvement appear to be the most important independent predictors of symptom onset.
    PLoS ONE 03/2014; 9(3):e90509. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background and Purpose. Fatigue and memory impairment are common symptoms in multiple sclerosis (MS) and both may interact with cognition. This can contribute to making a complaint misrepresentative of the objective disorder. We sought to determine whether fatigue complaint in MS reflects memory impairment and investigated whether patients' subjective fatigue is associated with memory complaint. Methods. Fifty MS patients complaining of fatigue underwent subjective assessment of fatigue and memory complaint measured using self-assessment scales. Cognitive functions were assessed using a battery of neuropsychological tests, including a test of verbal episodic memory, the selective reminding test (SRT). Correlations were studied between subjective fatigue, memory complaint, and performance in verbal episodic memory. Results. Depression score, psychotropic and/or antiepileptic drug use, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score, and MS form were confounding factors. After adjusting for these confounding factors, neither fatigue complaint nor memory complaint was correlated with SRT performance. Subjective fatigue was significantly associated with memory complaint. Conclusion. Although complaint of fatigue in MS was correlated with memory complaint, subjective fatigue was not the expression of memory impairment.
    Multiple sclerosis international. 03/2014; 2014:692468.
    This article is viewable in ResearchGate's enriched format
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    ABSTRACT: Background Patients who develop relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) present with a first clinical demyelinating event. In this double-blind, multicentre, randomised, phase 3 study we investigated the effect of oral cladribine on conversion to clinically definite MS in patients with a first clinical demyelinating event, when given at the same doses shown to be effective in relapsing-remitting MS. Methods Between Oct 21, 2008, and Oct 11, 2010, we recruited patients aged 18–55 years, inclusive, from 160 hospitals, private clinics, or treatment centres in 34 countries. Eligible patients had a first clinical demyelinating event within 75 days before screening, at least two clinically silent lesions of at least 3 mm on a T2-weighted brain MRI scan, and an Expanded Disability Status Scale score of 5·0 or lower. Patients with a first clinical demyelinating event ≤75 days before screening were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to receive cladribine tablets at cumulative doses of 5·25 mg/kg or 3·5 mg/kg or placebo. Randomisation was done with a central web-based randomisation system and was stratified by geographic region. Masking was maintained using a two-physician model. The primary endpoint of this 96-week study was time to conversion to clinically definite MS according to the Poser criteria. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00725985. Findings Of 903 participants assessed for eligibility, 616 patients received cladribine 5·25 mg/kg (n=204), cladribine 3·5 mg/kg (n=206), or placebo (n=206). At trial termination on Oct 25, 2011, cladribine was associated with a risk reduction versus placebo for time to conversion to clinically definite MS (hazard ratio [HR] for 5·25 mg/kg=0·38, 95% CI 0·25–0·58, p<0·0001; HR for 3·5 mg/kg=0·33, 0·21–0·51, p<0·0001). Adverse events were reported in 165 (81%) patients in the cladribine 5·25 mg/kg group, 168 (82%) patients in the cladribine 3·5 mg/kg group, and 162 (79%) patients in the placebo group. We noted no increase in risk of adverse events with active treatment versus placebo apart from lymphopenia, which was a severe event in 10 (5%) patients in the 5·25 mg/kg group and four (2%) patients in the 3·5 mg/kg group. Interpretation Both doses of cladribine significantly delayed MS diagnosis compared with placebo. The safety profile of cladribine was similar to that noted in a trial in patients with relapsing-remitting MS. Further research could clarify the potential effects of oral cladribine treatment in the early stages of MS. Funding Merck Serono SA Geneva, a subsidiary of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany.
    The Lancet Neurology 03/2014; 13(3). · 21.82 Impact Factor
  • Nicolas Collongues, Patrick Vermersch
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    ABSTRACT: Spasticity (muscle rigidity and spasms) is a frequent and disabling feature of multiple sclerosis (MS), and it can have a marked negative impact on the patient’s overall wellbeing and quality of life through a range of symptoms including impaired mobility, bladder dysfunction, stiffness, spasms and sleep disorders. Numerous antispastic agents such as baclofen and tizanidine, as well as others, are available for the management of MS spasticity but, overall, they offer limited clinical benefit. The current questionnaire survey assessed the epidemiology and management of MS spasticity globally and across the EU, among 157 healthcare professionals (>95% of all respondents were neurologists) attending a large, international MS congress (European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis, Lyon, France, 10–13 October 2012). Survey results showed similarity between the EU and rest-of-world respondents in the epidemiology of MS spasticity, the use of assessment tools to monitor patients, the incidence and severity of symptoms, and management options. Respondents indicated that approximately 40% of their MS patients had spasticity and it was rated as mild in approximately 40%, moderate in 35% and severe in 25% of patients. At least 40% of practitioners were dissatisfied with treatment options in their patients with moderate-to-severe MS; this highlights the unmet needs and challenges facing specialists in the management of MS patients with moderate-to-severe spasticity.
    Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics 01/2014; 13(3s). · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Influence de la durée d'évolution de la maladie et de l'âge sur les troubles cognitifs de patients âgés atteints d'une sclérose en plaques de forme rémittente (SEP-RR) The influence of age and illness duration on cognitive impairment in aging patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS) Ti e a part : C. Moroni Résumé. L'objectif de cette étude était de dissocier l'effet de l'âge de celui de la durée d'évolution de la maladie sur les capacités cognitives de patients SEP-RR. Pour cela, nous avons mené parallèlement deux études à l'aide d'épreuves issues de la Batterie courte d'évaluation des fonctions cognitives adaptée aux patients souffrants de la SEP (BCcogSEP). Les patients âgés de plus de 50 ans dont la durée de la maladie excédait 20 ans présentaient plus de troubles cognitifs que les patients du même âge dont la durée de la maladie était de moins de 10 ans et que des participants témoins appariés en âge. Les capacités cognitives affectées par la durée d'évolution de la maladie étaient la vitesse de traitement, la mémoire épisodique, les fluences verbales et l'attention. En revanche, à durée d'évolution égale (8 ans), il ne semble pas exister d'effet de l'âge sur les capacités cognitives dans la SEP-RR puisque les patients âgés et jeunes obtenaient des performances équivalentes. Les patients âgés obtenaient même de meilleures performances lors des tâches de fluence verbale ce qui est expliqué en partie par le concept de réserve cognitive. Mots clés : vieillissement cognitif, sclérose en plaques de forme rémittente, durée d'évolution de la maladie, réserve cognitive Abstract. The aim of this study was to dissociate age and duration of illness effects on cognitive impairment of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Cognitive impairment among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is well known. However, few stu-dies were devoted to assess the respective role of disease duration and age on cognitive functions in MS patients. Therefore, two studies were carried out on relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS) patients using some tests of the BCcogSEP – a French test battery evaluating cog-nitive functions in MS. The cognitive deficits of RR-MS patients aged 50 years and over and whose symptoms had been present for more than 20 years were more severe than those of MS patients with a shorter illness duration (less than 10 years) or matched-age control participants. The more impaired cognitive functions were information-processing speed, episodic memory, verbal fluency and attention. On the other hand, cognitive performances of young RR-MS patients were similar to those of older RR-MS patients when all patients had the same illness duration (8 years in this study). Older patients even achieved better per-formance than younger ones on verbal fluency. This can be partly explained by the theory of cognitive reserve, as reported in previous cognitive aging studies. In RR-MS patients, the influence of illness duration seems to be a predominant factor in the development of cognitive impairment.
    Geriatrie et psychologie neuropsychiatrie du vieillissement 01/2014; 12(3):331-8. · 0.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Encephalitis with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies (anti-NMDAR-Ab) is a rapid-onset encephalitis including psychosis, seizures, various movement disorders and autonomic system disturbances. We report a very unusual case of extensive myelitis associated with anti-NMDAR-Ab. MRI also revealed a hyperintense T2 lesion, non-suggestive of MS, which progressively extended, associated with periventricular gadolinium enhancement visualized on brain MRI. Ophthalmological evaluation showed subclinical right optic neuritis. The absence of anti-AQP4 antibody argued against neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. A slight psychomotor slowing prompted us to search for various causes of autoimmune encephalitis. Anti-NMDAR-Ab was found in cerebrospinal fluid. In patients with extensive myelitis who are seronegative for anti-AQP4 antibodies, and after other classical causes have been excluded, the hypothesis of atypical anti-NMDAR-Ab encephalitis should also be considered.
    BMC Neurology 12/2013; 13(1):211. · 2.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An association between multiple sclerosis (MS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been suggested. The purpose of this study was to compare the disease course of patients with both MS and IBD with that of patients with isolated MS or isolated IBD. Sixty-six MS-IBD patients were identified and were matched with 251 isolated MS and 257 isolated IBD controls. Main outcomes were scores using the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) in MS and extent of disease extension in IBD at last clinical evaluation. After a median 12 years of disease duration, the median EDSS and the percentages of patients reaching an EDSS of 3.0 and 4.0 were significantly lower in MS-IBD patients than in controls. MS had no impact on IBD. MS course appears to be milder in patients with concomitant IBD.
    Multiple Sclerosis 12/2013; · 4.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction Cavitary white matter changes are mainly described in leukodystrophies and especially in vanishing white matter disease. Large cavitary lesions are not typical for multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods We studied MS patients with large cavitary brain lesions. Patient characteristics, disease onset/duration/subtype, expanded disability status scale (EDSS), mini mental state (MMS), vanishing white matter disease genetic analysis, and MRI characteristics of the cavitary lesions were analyzed. Results Twenty patients were analyzed (6 men and 14 women). Mean age at disease onset was 37.6 (range 17–58). Mean disease duration was 10 years (range 2–20). Five patients had initial relapsing-remitting MS and nine patients had primary-progressive MS. Mean EDSS was 5.5 (range 2–8). Mean MMS was 20/30. Vanishing white matter disease genetic analysis was performed and negative in seven patients. Inferior corpus callosum lesions were seen in all patients with available sagittal FLAIR sequences. Cavitary lesions were strictly supratentorial, and located inside the diffuse leukoencephalopathy, with often a posterior predominance. Conclusion MS patients with large cavitary lesions seem to represent a MS subgroup, predominantly women, with relatively late disease onset, predominantly primary-progressive type, relatively high EDSS scores, and severe cognitive dysfunction.
    Revue Neurologique 12/2013; · 0.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:Therapeutic strategies for patients with MS partly rely on contrast-enhanced MR imaging. Our aim was to assess the diagnostic performance of 3D turbo spin-echo MR imaging with variable refocusing flip angles at 3T for the detection of enhanced inflammatory lesions in patients with multiple sclerosis.MATERIALS AND METHODS:Fifty-six patients with MS were prospectively investigated by using postcontrast T1-weighted axial 2D spin-echo and 3D TSE MR images. The order in which both sequences were performed was randomized. Axial reformats from 3D T1 TSE were generated to match the 2D spin-echo images. The reference standard was defined by using clinical data and all MR images available. Three separate sets of MR images (2D spin-echo images, axial reformats, and multiplanar images from 3D TSE sequences) were examined in a blinded fashion by 2 neuroradiologists separately for the detection of enhanced MS lesions. Image artifacts and contrast were evaluated.RESULTS:No artifacts related to vascular pulsation were observed on 3D TSE images, whereas image artifacts were demonstrated on 2D spin-echo images in 41 patients. One hundred twelve enhanced MS lesions were identified in 19 patients. Sixty-four lesions were correctly diagnosed by using 2D spin-echo images; 90, by using 3D TSE axial reformatted views; and 106, by using multiplanar analysis of the 3D TSE sequence. Multiplanar analysis was 94.7% sensitive and 100% specific for the diagnosis of patients with at least 1 enhanced lesion. Contrast of enhanced MS lesions was significantly improved by using the 3D TSE sequence (P < .011).CONCLUSIONS:The 3D TSE sequence with multiplanar analysis is a useful tool for the detection of enhanced MS lesions.
    American Journal of Neuroradiology 11/2013; · 3.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cavitary white matter changes are mainly described in leukodystrophies and especially in vanishing white matter disease. Large cavitary lesions are not typical for multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied MS patients with large cavitary brain lesions. Patient characteristics, disease onset/duration/subtype, expanded disability status scale (EDSS), mini mental state (MMS), vanishing white matter disease genetic analysis, and MRI characteristics of the cavitary lesions were analyzed. Twenty patients were analyzed (6 men and 14 women). Mean age at disease onset was 37.6 (range 17-58). Mean disease duration was 10 years (range 2-20). Five patients had initial relapsing-remitting MS and nine patients had primary-progressive MS. Mean EDSS was 5.5 (range 2-8). Mean MMS was 20/30. Vanishing white matter disease genetic analysis was performed and negative in seven patients. Inferior corpus callosum lesions were seen in all patients with available sagittal FLAIR sequences. Cavitary lesions were strictly supratentorial, and located inside the diffuse leukoencephalopathy, with often a posterior predominance. MS patients with large cavitary lesions seem to represent a MS subgroup, predominantly women, with relatively late disease onset, predominantly primary-progressive type, relatively high EDSS scores, and severe cognitive dysfunction.
    Revue Neurologique 10/2013; · 0.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In previous studies, teriflunomide significantly reduced the annualised relapse rate (ARR) and disability progression. This phase 3, rater-blinded study (NCT00883337) compared teriflunomide with interferon-beta-1a (IFNβ-1a). Patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis were randomised (1:1:1) to oral teriflunomide 7-or 14mg, or subcutaneous IFNβ-1a 44µg. The primary composite endpoint was time to failure, defined as first occurrence of confirmed relapse or permanent treatment discontinuation for any cause. Secondary endpoints included ARR, Fatigue Impact Scale (FIS) and Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM). The study was completed 48 weeks after the last patient was randomised. Some 324 patients were randomised (IFNβ-1a: 104; teriflunomide 7 mg: 109; teriflunomide 14 mg: 111). No difference in time to failure was observed. There was no difference in ARR between teriflunomide 14 mg and IFNβ-1a, but ARR was significantly higher with teriflunomide 7 mg. FIS scores indicated more frequent fatigue with IFNβ-1a, though differences were only significant with teriflunomide 7 mg. TSQM scores were significantly higher with teriflunomide. There were no unexpected safety findings. Effects on time to failure were comparable between teriflunomide and IFNβ-1a. There was no difference between teriflunomide 14 mg and IFNβ-1a on ARR, though ARR was higher with teriflunomide 7 mg. The teriflunomide safety profile was consistent with previous studies.
    Multiple Sclerosis 10/2013; · 4.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the rate of JC virus (JCV) seroconversion/seroreversion in a French cohort of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients receiving natalizumab (NTZ), describe the characteristics of this population, identify risk factors for JCV seropositivity and analyse the additional value of quantitative JCV serology results in this context. MS patients from two French MS centres, whose JCV serological status in 2011 while receiving NTZ was known (n=357; first-generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test (Gen1)), were proposed for inclusion in this study. We evaluated the rate of JCV seroconversion over a period of one year with a second-generation ELISA test (Gen2; n=303) and analysed the quantitative results. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify risk factors for JCV seropositivity. Among the patients with Gen2 JCV serology (n=303) that had been JCV-seronegative one year before (n=165), the rate of JCV seroconversion was 26.67% (44/165). We observed a higher proportion of anti-JCV antibody seroconverters (14.5%) than expected (≤3%) but also increasing index values of anti-JCV antibody over time. Our data suggest that JCV reactivation occurs during NTZ therapy and leads to an increase in the anti-JCV antibodies titre, thus making them more easily detectable by the second-generation ELISA test.
    Multiple Sclerosis 09/2013; · 4.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: In Assessment of OraL Laquinimod in PrEventing ProGRession in Multiple SclerOsis (ALLEGRO), a phase III study in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), oral laquinimod slowed disability and brain atrophy progression, suggesting laquinimod may reduce tissue damage in MS. MRI techniques sensitive to the most destructive aspects of the disease were used to further investigate laquinimod's potential effects on inflammation and neurodegeneration. METHODS: 1106 RRMS patients were randomised 1:1 to receive once-daily oral laquinimod (0.6 mg) or placebo for 24 months. White matter (WM), grey matter (GM) and thalamic fractions were derived at months 0, 12 and 24. Also assessed were evolution of gadolinium-enhancing and/or new T2 lesions into permanent black holes (PBH); magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR) of normal-appearing brain tissue (NABT), WM, GM and T2 lesions; and N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) levels in WM. RESULTS: Compared with placebo, laquinimod-treated patients showed lower rates of WM at months 12 and 24 (p=0.004 and p=0.035) and GM (p=0.004) atrophy at month 12 and a trend for less GM atrophy at month 24 (p=0.078). Laquinimod also slowed thalamic atrophy at month 12 (p=0.005) and month 24 (p=0.003) and reduced the number of PBH at 12 and 24 months evolving from active lesions (all p<0.05). By month 24, MTR decreased significantly in NABT (p=0.015), WM (p=0.011) and GM (p=0.034) in placebo-treated patients, but not in laquinimod-treated patients. WM NAA/Cr tended to increase with laquinimod and decrease with placebo at 24 months (p=0.179). CONCLUSIONS: Oral laquinimod may reduce (at least in the initial phase of treatment) some of the more destructive pathological processes in RRMS patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The ALLEGRO trial identifier number with clinicaltrials.gov is NCT00509145. KEYWORDS: MRI, Multiple Sclerosis
    Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry 09/2013; · 4.87 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

6k Citations
1,362.55 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1982–2014
    • University of Lille Nord de France
      Lille, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
  • 2013
    • Fondation Rothschild
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2010–2013
    • University of Strasbourg
      Strasburg, Alsace, France
  • 1990–2013
    • Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille
      • • Urology Service
      • • Division of Neurology
      Lille, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
  • 2012
    • Hôpital Paris Saint Joseph
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
    • University of Liège
      Luik, Walloon Region, Belgium
  • 2001–2011
    • Lille Catholic University
      Lille, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
  • 1998–2011
    • CHRU de Strasbourg
      Strasburg, Alsace, France
  • 2007
    • Centre Hospitalier de Valenciennes
      Valenciennes, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
  • 1992–1997
    • Unité Inserm U1077
      Caen, Lower Normandy, France
  • 1995
    • Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nice
      Nice, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
  • 1993
    • VU University Amsterdam
      • Department of Neurology
      Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands