Jorge López-Ayerbe

Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Catalonia, Spain

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Publications (12)21.95 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Introduction and objectives Valve repair is the procedure of choice for severe mitral regurgitation due to leaflet prolapse. The aim of this study is to analyze the mid-term results of mitral valve repair. Methods We performed a prospective study including patients with severe degenerative mitral regurgitation due to leaflet prolapse (one or two segments) who underwent mitral valve repair during the study period (2002–2008) in our hospital. Clinical and echocardiographic evaluation was performed before surgery, intraoperatively and during the follow-up. Results Mitral valve repair was performed in 100 patients (mean age 65 ± 12 years-old, 66% males). The accuracy of preoperative echocardio-graphic identification of the prolapsed segments/ scallops was 96.3%. Intraoperative mortality was 0% and hospital mortality 4%. Median follow-up period was 31 months (1–93). Freedom from reoperation at 1 year and 5 years was 98 and 96%. The actuarial survival rate at 1 year and 5 years was 94 and 92%. No patient operated on in NYHA class I-II required a reoperation, being both inhospital and follow-up mortality zero in that group of patients. Conclusions Mitral valve repair proved to be a safe and effective technique. A multidisciplinary team allows a correct patient’s selection and the application of the right surgical technique. Awaiting for longer follow-up results are satisfactory.
    Cirugía Cardiovascular. 10/2010; 17(4):301–309.
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    ABSTRACT: Left atrial wall haematoma is a very uncommon entity, associated mainly to cardiac surgery, interventional procedures, or trauma. Spontaneous cases are supposed to be associated with left atrial wall pathology. We present a case of a 53-year-old male who was admitted for prolonged chest pain, with transthoracic and transesophagic echocardiography documentation of a left atrial mass in close proximity to a mitral annular calcification. Tissue characterization with cardiac magnetic resonance suggested the aetiology of the mass, which was confirmed histologically.
    European Heart Journal – Cardiovascular Imaging 12/2009; 11(5):E18. · 2.65 Impact Factor
  • Xavier Carrillo, Jorge López-Ayerbe, Elena Ferrer, Xavier Ruyra
    Revista Espa de Cardiologia 01/2009; 61(12):1360-1. · 3.20 Impact Factor
  • Xavier Carrillo, Jorge López-Ayerbe, Elena Ferrer, Xavier Ruyra
    Revista Espa de Cardiologia 12/2008; 61(12):1360-1361. · 3.34 Impact Factor
  • Medicina Clínica 02/2008; 130(1):40. · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background and objective Left atrium diameter (LAD) is a very simple and easy parameter to obtain by echocardiography. It is influenced by systolic and diastolic ventricular dysfunction and by the coexistence of mitral regurgitation. We evaluated LAD as a predictor of prognosis (2 year mortality) in a heart failure (HF) population admitted to an outpatient HF unit. We compared LAD (mm/m2) with other echocardiographic parameters (left ventricular ejection fraction, left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic diameters [mm/m2], mitral regurgitation, degree of diastolic dysfunction and pulmonary artery pressure). Patients and method We studied 368 patients (73% men; mean age [standard deviation]: 65.2 [11] years; 60% of ischemic etiology). The mean left ventricular ejection fraction by echocardiography was 32.3% (13.1%). The majority of patients were in NYHA (New York Heart Association)class II (48%) or III (43%). Results Two years mortality was 20.6%. In the univariate analysis LAD (p < 0.001), left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (p < 0.001), left ventricular end-systolic diameter (p = 0.003), the degree of mitral regurgitation (p = 0.002) and the pattern of diastolic dysfunction (p = 0.004) showed a significant relationship with 2 years mortality, but not left ventricular ejection fraction and pulmonary pressure. In the echocardiographic multivariate analysis, only LAD remained significantly associated with mortality. In the multivariate analysis including important clinical parameters such as age, sex, etiology, time lapsed since symptoms onset, NYHA functional class, and the presence of diabetes, hypertension and atrial fibrillation, LAD remained as independent predictor of 2 years mortality. Patients with LAD less than 25 mm/m2 have a 10.9% mortality, whereas those with LAD equal or greater than 25 mm/m2 have a 30.1% mortality (p < 0.001). Conclusions LAD was a good predictor of 2 years mortality, better than other echocardiographic parametersin patients of our outpatient HF unit and was independent of strong clinical parameters.
    Medicina Clínica 10/2007; 129(12):441-445. · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Left atrium diameter (LAD) is a very simple and easy parameter to obtain by echocardiography. It is influenced by systolic and diastolic ventricular dysfunction and by the coexistence of mitral regurgitation. We evaluated LAD as a predictor of prognosis (2 year mortality) in a heart failure (HF) population admitted to an outpatient HF unit. We compared LAD (mm/m2) with other echocardiographic parameters (left ventricular ejection fraction, left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic diameters [mm/m2], mitral regurgitation, degree of diastolic dysfunction and pulmonary artery pressure). We studied 368 patients (73% men; mean age [standard deviation]: 65.2 [11] years; 60% of ischemic etiology). The mean left ventricular ejection fraction by echocardiography was 32.3% (13.1%). The majority of patients were in NYHA (New York Heart Association) class II (48%) or III (43%). Two years mortality was 20.6%. In the univariate analysis LAD (p < 0.001), left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (p < 0.001), left ventricular end-systolic diameter (p = 0.003), the degree of mitral regurgitation (p = 0.002) and the pattern of diastolic dysfunction (p = 0.004) showed a significant relationship with 2 years mortality, but not left ventricular ejection fraction and pulmonary pressure. In the echocardiographic multivariate analysis, only LAD remained significantly associated with mortality. In the multivariate analysis including important clinical parameters such as age, sex, etiology, time lapsed since symptoms onset, NYHA functional class, and the presence of diabetes, hypertension and atrial fibrillation, LAD remained as independent predictor of 2 years mortality. Patients with LAD less than 25 mm/m2 have a 10.9% mortality, whereas those with LAD equal or greater than 25 mm/m2 have a 30.1% mortality (p < 0.001). LAD was a good predictor of 2 years mortality, better than other echocardiographic parameters in patients of our outpatient HF unit and was independent of strong clinical parameters.
    Medicina Clínica 10/2007; 129(12):441-5. · 1.25 Impact Factor
  • Medicina Clínica 10/2004; 1123(18):720-720. · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We describe the case of a young man who, while he was in coma because of a traffic accident, had first a pulmonary embolus and immediately afterwards had a systemic (cerebral) embolus. A transesophageal echocardiographic image revealed a giant thrombi trapped in foramen ovale protruding in right and left ventricles, diagnosing, thus, a paradoxical embolism. The relationship between patent foramen ovale and pulmonary embolism has been reported in some series. Elevated right-chamber pressure caused by pulmonary hypertension could favor the establishment of a right-to-left shunt, causing, in some cases, paradoxical embolisms. We review the clinical implications.
    Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography 09/2004; 17(8):916-8. · 3.99 Impact Factor
  • Medicina Clínica 01/2004; 122(15):600-600. · 1.25 Impact Factor
  • Miquel Gómez, Jorge López-Ayerbe, Eduardo Larrousse
    Medicina Clínica 01/2003; 120(2):80-80. · 1.25 Impact Factor
  • Miquel Gómez, Jorge López-Ayerbe, Eduardo Larrousse
    Medicina Clínica 01/2003; 120(2):80. · 1.25 Impact Factor