Dong-Uk Kim

Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology KRIBB, Anzan, Gyeonggi Province, South Korea

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Publications (34)219.63 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide targeted gene deletion, a systematic method to study gene function by replacing target genes with deletion cassettes, using serial-PCR or block-PCR requires elaborate skill. We developed a novel gene-synthesis method to systematically prepare deletion cassettes on a 96-well basis in fission yeast. We designed the 2129-bp deletion cassette as three modules: a central 1397-bp KanMX4 selection marker module and two flanking 366-bp gene-specific artificial linker modules. The central KanMX4 module can be used in multiple deletion cassettes in combination with different sets of flanking modules. The deletion cassettes consisted of 147 oligonucleotides (93 for the central module+25 for each of the flanking modules+4 for the joints) and the oligonucleotides were designed as ~29mers using an in-house program. Oligonucleotides were synthesized on a 96-well basis and ligated into deletion cassettes without gaps by ligase chain reaction, which was followed by two rounds of nested PCR to amplify trace amounts of the ligated cassettes. After the artificial linkers were removed from the deletion cassettes, the cassettes were transformed into wild-type diploid fission yeast strain SP286. We validated the transformed colonies via check PCR and subjected them to tetrad analysis to confirm functional integrity. Using this method, we systematically deleted 563 genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe with a >90% success rate and a point-mutation rate of ~0.4 mutations per kb. Our method can be used to create systematic gene deletions in a variety of yeasts especially when it included a bar-code system for parallel analyses.
    Journal of microbiological methods. 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Vorinostat (VOR) has been reported to enhance the cytotoxic effects of doxorubicin (DOX) with fewer side effects because of the lower DOX dosage in breast cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the novel mechanism underlying the synergistic cytotoxic effects of VOR and DOX co-treatment in cervical cancer cells HeLa, CaSki and SiHa cells. Co-treatment with VOR and DOX at marginal doses led to the induction of apoptosis through caspase-3 activation, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and DNA micronuclei. Notably, the synergistic growth inhibition induced by the co-treatment was attributed to the upregulation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bad, as the silencing of Bad expression using small interfering RNA (siRNA) abolished the phenomenon. As siRNA against p53 did not result in an increase in acetylated p53 and the consequent upregulation of Bad, the observed Bad upregulation was mediated by acetylated p53. Moreover, a chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that the co-treatment of HeLa cells with VOR and DOX increased the recruitment of acetylated p53 to the bad promoter, with consequent bad transactivation. Conversely, C33A cervical cancer cells containing mutant p53 co-treated with VOR and DOX did not exhibit Bad upregulation, acetylated p53 induction or consequent synergistic growth inhibition. Together, the synergistic growth inhibition of cervical cancer cell lines induced by co-treatment with VOR and DOX can be attributed to the upregulation of Bad, which is induced by acetylated p53. These results show for the first time that the acetylation of p53, rather than histones, is a mechanism for the synergistic growth inhibition induced by VOR and DOX co-treatments.
    Experimental & molecular medicine. 01/2014; 46:e76.
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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide chemical genetic profiles in S. cerevisiae since the budding yeast deletion library construction have been successfully used to reveal unknown mode-of-actions of drugs. Here, we introduce comparative approach to infer drug target proteins more accurately using two compendiums of chemical-genetic profiles from the budding yeast S. cerevisiae and the fission yeast S. pombe. For the first time, we established DNA-chip based growth defect measurement of genome-wide deletion strains of S. pombe, and then applied 47 drugs to the pooled heterozygous deletion strains to generate chemical-genetic profiles in S. pombe. In our approach, putative drug targets were inferred from strains hypersensitive to given drugs by analyzing S. pombe and S. cerevisiae compendiums. Notably, many evidences in the literature revealed that the inferred target genes of fungicide and bactericide identified by such comparative approach are in fact the direct targets. Furthermore, by filtering out the genes with no essentiality, the multi-drug sensitivity genes, and the genes with less eukaryotic conservation, we created a set of drug target gene candidates that are expected to be directly affected by a given drug in human cells. Our study demonstrated that it is highly beneficial to construct the multiple compendiums of chemical genetic profiles using many different species. The fission yeast chemical-genetic compendium is available at http://pombe.kaist.ac.kr/compendium.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 06/2013; · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To identify near complete sets of genes required for the cell cycle and cell shape, we have visually screened a genome-wide gene deletion library of 4843 fission yeast deletion mutants (95.7% of total protein encoding genes) for their effects on these processes. A total of 513 genes have been identified as being required for cell cycle progression, 276 of which have not been previously described as cell cycle genes. Deletions of a further 333 genes lead to specific alterations in cell shape and another 524 genes result in generally misshapen cells. Here, we provide the first eukaryotic resource of gene deletions, which describes a near genome-wide set of genes required for the cell cycle and cell shape.
    Open Biology 01/2013; 3(5):130053. · 3.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To identify the genes required to sustain aneuploid viability, we screened a deletion library of non-essential genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, in which most types of aneuploidy are eventually lethal to the cell. Aneuploids remain viable for a period of time and can form colonies by reducing the extent of the aneuploidy. We hypothesized that a reduction in colony formation efficiency could be used to screen for gene deletions that compromise aneuploid viability. Deletion mutants were used to measure the effects on the viability of spores derived from triploid meiosis and from a chromosome instability mutant. We found that the CCR4-NOT complex, an evolutionarily conserved general regulator of mRNA turnover, and other related factors, including poly(A)-specific nuclease for mRNA decay, are involved in aneuploid viability. Defective mutations in CCR4-NOT complex components in the distantly related yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae also affected the viability of spores produced from triploid cells, suggesting that this complex has a conserved role in aneuploids. In addition, our findings suggest that the genes required for homologous recombination repair are important for aneuploid viability.
    PLoS Genetics 06/2012; 8(6):e1002776. · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Type 1 phosphatase (PP1) antagonizes Aurora B kinase to stabilize kinetochore-microtubule attachments and to silence the spindle checkpoint. We screened for factors that exacerbate the growth defect of Δdis2 cells, which lack one of two catalytic subunits of PP1 in fission yeast, and identified Nsk1, a novel protein required for accurate chromosome segregation. During interphase, Nsk1 resides in the nucleolus but spreads throughout the nucleoplasm as cells enter mitosis. Following dephosphorylation by Clp1 (Cdc14-like) phosphatase and at least one other phosphatase, Nsk1 localizes to the interface between kinetochores and the inner face of the spindle pole body during anaphase. In the absence of Nsk1, some kinetochores become detached from spindle poles during anaphase B. If this occurs late in anaphase B, then the sister chromatids of unclustered kinetochores segregate to the correct daughter cell. These unclustered kinetochores are efficiently captured, retrieved, bioriented, and segregated during the following mitosis, as long as Dis2 is present. However, if kinetochores are detached from a spindle pole early in anaphase B, then these sister chromatids become missegregated. These data suggest Nsk1 ensures accurate chromosome segregation by promoting the tethering of kinetochores to spindle poles during anaphase B.
    Molecular biology of the cell 09/2011; 22(23):4486-502. · 5.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mammalian lipid homeostasis requires proteolytic activation of membrane-bound sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors through sequential action of the Golgi Site-1 and Site-2 proteases. Here we report that while SREBP function is conserved in fungi, fission yeast employs a different mechanism for SREBP cleavage. Using genetics and biochemistry, we identified four genes defective for SREBP cleavage, dsc1-4, encoding components of a transmembrane Golgi E3 ligase complex with structural homology to the Hrd1 E3 ligase complex involved in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation. The Dsc complex binds SREBP and cleavage requires components of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway: the E2-conjugating enzyme Ubc4, the Dsc1 RING E3 ligase, and the proteasome. dsc mutants display conserved aggravating genetic interactions with components of the multivesicular body pathway in fission yeast and budding yeast, which lacks SREBP. Together, these data suggest that the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase complex functions in a post-ER pathway for protein degradation.
    Molecular cell 04/2011; 42(2):160-71. · 14.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nucleotide synthesis is a universal response to DNA damage, but how this response facilitates DNA repair and cell survival is unclear. Here we establish a role for DNA damage-induced nucleotide synthesis in homologous recombination (HR) repair in fission yeast. Using a genetic screen, we found the Ddb1-Cul4(Cdt)² ubiquitin ligase complex and ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) to be required for HR repair of a DNA double-strand break (DSB). The Ddb1-Cul4(Cdt)² ubiquitin ligase complex is required for degradation of Spd1, an inhibitor of RNR in fission yeast. Accordingly, deleting spd1(+) suppressed the DNA damage sensitivity and the reduced HR efficiency associated with loss of ddb1(+) or cdt2(+). Furthermore, we demonstrate a role for nucleotide synthesis in postsynaptic gap filling of resected ssDNA ends during HR repair. Finally, we define a role for Rad3 (ATR) in nucleotide synthesis and HR through increasing Cdt2 nuclear levels in response to DNA damage. Our findings support a model in which break-induced Rad3 and Ddb1-Cul4(Cdt)² ubiquitin ligase-dependent Spd1 degradation and RNR activation promotes postsynaptic ssDNA gap filling during HR repair.
    Genes & Development 12/2010; 24(23):2705-16. · 12.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a model organism used widely to study various aspects of eukaryotic biology. A collection of heterozygous diploid strains containing individual deletions in nearly all S. pombe genes has been created using a PCR based strategy. However, deletion of some genes has not been possible using this methodology. Here we use an efficient knockout strategy based on plasmids that contain large regions homologous to the target gene to delete an additional 29 genes. The collection of deletion mutants now covers 99% of the fission yeast open reading frames.
    Cell cycle (Georgetown, Tex.) 06/2010; 9(12):2399-402. · 5.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report the construction and analysis of 4,836 heterozygous diploid deletion mutants covering 98.4% of the fission yeast genome providing a tool for studying eukaryotic biology. Comprehensive gene dispensability comparisons with budding yeast--the only other eukaryote for which a comprehensive knockout library exists--revealed that 83% of single-copy orthologs in the two yeasts had conserved dispensability. Gene dispensability differed for certain pathways between the two yeasts, including mitochondrial translation and cell cycle checkpoint control. We show that fission yeast has more essential genes than budding yeast and that essential genes are more likely than nonessential genes to be present in a single copy, to be broadly conserved and to contain introns. Growth fitness analyses determined sets of haploinsufficient and haploproficient genes for fission yeast, and comparisons with budding yeast identified specific ribosomal proteins and RNA polymerase subunits, which may act more generally to regulate eukaryotic cell growth.
    Nature Biotechnology 06/2010; 28(6):617-23. · 32.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In fission yeast, RNAi directs heterochromatin formation at centromeres, telomeres, and the mating type locus. Noncoding RNAs transcribed from repeat elements generate siRNAs that are incorporated into the Argonaute-containing RITS complex and direct it to nascent homologous transcripts. This leads to recruitment of the CLRC complex, including the histone methyltransferase Clr4, promoting H3K9 methylation and heterochromatin formation. A key question is what mediates the recruitment of Clr4/CLRC to transcript-bound RITS. We have identified a LIM domain protein, Stc1, that is required for centromeric heterochromatin integrity. Our analyses show that Stc1 is specifically required to establish H3K9 methylation via RNAi, and interacts both with the RNAi effector Ago1, and with the chromatin-modifying CLRC complex. Moreover, tethering Stc1 to a euchromatic locus is sufficient to induce silencing and heterochromatin formation independently of RNAi. We conclude that Stc1 associates with RITS on centromeric transcripts and recruits CLRC, thereby coupling RNAi to chromatin modification.
    Cell 03/2010; 140(5):666-77. · 31.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Investigation into the switch between single-celled and filamentous forms of fungi may provide insights into cell polarity, differentiation, and fungal pathogenicity. At the molecular level, much of this investigation has fallen on two closely related budding yeasts, Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Recently, the much more distant fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe was shown to form invasive filaments after nitrogen limitation (E. Amoah-Buahin, N. Bone, and J. Armstrong, Eukaryot. Cell 4:1287-1297, 2005) and this genetically tractable organism provides an alternative system for the study of dimorphic growth. Here we describe a second mode of mycelial formation of S. pombe, on rich media. Screening of an S. pombe haploid deletion library identified 12 genes required for mycelial development which encode potential transcription factors, orthologues of S. cerevisiae Sec14p and Tlg2p, and the formin For3, among others. These were further grouped into two phenotypic classes representing different stages of the process. We show that galactose-dependent cell adhesion and actin assembly are both required for mycelial formation and mutants lacking a range of genes controlling cell polarity all produce mycelia but with radically altered morphology.
    Eukaryotic Cell 07/2009; 8(8):1298-306. · 3.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The maintenance of genome stability is essential for an organism to avoid cell death and cancer. Based on screens for mutant sensitivity against DNA damaging agents a large number of DNA repair and DNA damage checkpoint genes have previously been identified in genetically amenable model organisms. These screens have however not been exhaustive and various genes have been, and remain to be, identified by other means. We therefore screened a genome-wide Schizosaccharomyces pombe deletion library for mutants sensitive against various DNA damaging agents. Screening the library on different concentrations of these genotoxins allowed us to assign a semi-quantitative score to each mutant expressing the degree of sensitivity. We isolated a total of 229 mutants which show sensitivity to one or more of the DNA damaging agents used. This set of mutants was significantly enriched for processes involved in DNA replication, DNA repair, DNA damage checkpoint, response to UV, mating type switching, telomere length maintenance and meiosis, and also for processes involved in the establishment and maintenance of chromatin architecture (notably members of the SAGA complex), transcription (members of the CCR4-Not complex) and microtubule related processes (members of the DASH complex). We also identified 23 sensitive mutants which had previously been classified as "sequence orphan" or as "conserved hypothetical". Among these, we identified genes showing extensive homology to CtIP, Stra13, Ybp1/Ybp2, Human Fragile X mental retardation interacting protein NUFIP1, and Aprataxin. The identification of these homologues will provide a basis for the further characterisation of the role of these conserved proteins in the genetically amenable model organism S. pombe.
    DNA Repair 04/2009; 8(5):672-9. · 4.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Synthetic lethal genetic interaction networks define genes that work together to control essential functions and have been studied extensively in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the synthetic genetic array (SGA) analysis technique (ScSGA). The extent to which synthetic lethal or other genetic interaction networks are conserved between species remains uncertain. To address this question, we compared literature-curated and experimentally derived genetic interaction networks for two distantly related yeasts, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and S. cerevisiae. We find that 23% of interactions in a novel, high-quality S. pombe literature-curated network are conserved in the existing S. cerevisiae network. Next, we developed a method, called S. pombe SGA analysis (SpSGA), enabling rapid, high-throughput isolation of genetic interactions in this species. Direct comparison by SpSGA and ScSGA of approximately 220 genes involved in DNA replication, the DNA damage response, chromatin remodeling, intracellular transport, and other processes revealed that approximately 29% of genetic interactions are common to both species, with the remainder exhibiting unique, species-specific patterns of genetic connectivity. We define a conserved yeast network (CYN) composed of 106 genes and 144 interactions and suggest that this network may help understand the shared biology of diverse eukaryotic species.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 11/2008; 105(43):16653-8. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An epistasis map (E-MAP) was constructed in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, by systematically measuring the phenotypes associated with pairs of mutations. This high-density, quantitative genetic interaction map focused on various aspects of chromosome function, including transcription regulation and DNA repair/replication. The E-MAP uncovered a previously unidentified component of the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery (rsh1) and linked the RNAi pathway to several other biological processes. Comparison of the S. pombe E-MAP to an analogous genetic map from the budding yeast revealed that, whereas negative interactions were conserved between genes involved in similar biological processes, positive interactions and overall genetic profiles between pairs of genes coding for physically associated proteins were even more conserved. Hence, conservation occurs at the level of the functional module (protein complex), but the genetic cross talk between modules can differ substantially.
    Science 10/2008; 322(5900):405-410. · 31.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The DNA glycosylase MutY is strongly conserved in evolution, and homologs are found in most eukaryotes and prokaryotes examined. This protein is implicated in repair of oxidative DNA damage, in particular adenine mispaired opposite 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine. Previous investigations in Escherichia coli, fission yeast, and mammalian cells show an association of mutations in MutY homologs with a mutator phenotype and carcinogenesis. Eukaryotic MutY homologs physically associate with several proteins with a role in replication, DNA repair, and checkpoint signaling, specifically the trimeric 9-1-1 complex. In a genetic investigation of the fission yeast MutY homolog, myh1(+), we show that the myh1 mutation confers a moderately increased UV sensitivity alone and in combination with mutations in several DNA repair genes. The myh1 rad1, and to a lesser degree myh1 rad9, double mutants display a synthetic interaction resulting in enhanced sensitivity to DNA damaging agents and hydroxyurea. UV irradiation of myh1 rad1 double mutants results in severe chromosome segregation defects and visible DNA fragmentation, and a failure to activate the checkpoint. Additionally, myh1 rad1 double mutants exhibit morphological defects in the absence of DNA damaging agents. We also found a moderate suppression of the slow growth and UV sensitivity of rhp51 mutants by the myh1 mutation. Our results implicate fission yeast Myh1 in repair of a wider range of DNA damage than previously thought, and functionally link it to the checkpoint pathway.
    Mutation Research/Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis 10/2008; 644(1-2):48-55. · 3.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) induces cell proliferation in human aortic smooth muscle cells (hAoSMCs), which may be involved in atherogenesis and intimal hyperplasia. Recent studies have demonstrated that Cl- channels are related to vessel cell proliferation induced by a variety of stimuli. In this study, we investigated a potential role of Cl-channels in the signaling pathway of LDL effects on hAoSMC proliferation with a focus on the activation of Erk1/2-PI3K/Akt and the subsequent upregulation of Egr-1. Cl- channel blockers, DIDS, but neither NPPB nor Furosemide, completely abolished the LDL-induced DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. Moreover, DIDS, but not NPPB, significantly decreased LDL-stimulated Cl- concentration, as judged by flow cytometry analysis using MQAE as a Cl- -detection dye. DIDS pretreatment completely abolished the activation of Erk1/2 and PI3K/Akt in a dose-dependent manner that is the hallmark of LDL activation, as judged by Western blot and proliferation assays. Moreover, pretreatment with DIDS (Cl- channel blockers) but not LY294002 (PI3K inhibitors) completely abolished the LDL-induced upregulation of Egr-1 to the same extent as PD98059 (MEK inhibitors to inhibit Erk), as judged by Western blot and luciferase reporter assays. This is the first report, to our knowledge, that DIDS-sensitive Cl- channels play a key role in the LDL-induced cell proliferation of hAoSMCs via the activation of Erk1/2 and PI3K/Akt and the upregulation of Egr-1.
    Molecules and Cells 09/2008; 26(5):468-73. · 2.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The cell-based assay using yeast deletion mutants has been recognized as an efficient analysis to discover therapeutic compounds and reveal their mode of action. In this study, S. pombe deletion mutants-based HTS screening was carried out to identify potential anti-cancer agents. The NCI chemical library of 5700 compounds was screened using kit strains, which consisted of S. pombe mutants harboring deletions in genes involved in DNA repair and mitotic control. During the screening, we identified 40 compounds conferring growth inhibition of S. pombe. Their anti-tumorigenic properties were examined by phenotypic effect on S. pombe, flow cytometry and apoptosis analysis of human cancer. Here, we report hit compounds inducing apoptosis for development of anti-cancer agents suggesting that S. pombe deletion mutants are useful in identifying potential anti-cancer agents in human cancer therapeutics.
    Investigational New Drugs 09/2008; 26(4):299-307. · 3.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cadmium is a worldwide environmental toxicant responsible for a range of human diseases including cancer. Cellular injury from cadmium is minimized by stress-responsive detoxification mechanisms. We explored the genetic requirements for cadmium tolerance by individually screening mutants from the fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) haploid deletion collection for inhibited growth on agar growth media containing cadmium. Cadmium-sensitive mutants were further tested for sensitivity to oxidative stress (hydrogen peroxide) and osmotic stress (potassium chloride). Of 2649 mutants screened, 237 were sensitive to cadmium, of which 168 were cadmium specific. Most were previously unknown to be involved in cadmium tolerance. The 237 genes represent a number of pathways including sulfate assimilation, phytochelatin synthesis and transport, ubiquinone (Coenzyme Q10) biosynthesis, stress signaling, cell wall biosynthesis and cell morphology, gene expression and chromatin remodeling, vacuole function, and intracellular transport of macromolecules. The ubiquinone biosynthesis mutants are acutely sensitive to cadmium but only mildly sensitive to hydrogen peroxide, indicating that Coenzyme Q10 plays a larger role in cadmium tolerance than just as an antioxidant. These and several other mutants turn yellow when exposed to cadmium, suggesting cadmium sulfide accumulation. This phenotype can potentially be used as a biomarker for cadmium. There is remarkably little overlap with a comparable screen of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae haploid deletion collection, indicating that the two distantly related yeasts utilize significantly different strategies for coping with cadmium stress. These strategies and their relation to cadmium detoxification in humans are discussed.
    Toxicological Sciences 09/2008; 106(1):124-39. · 4.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abnormal phenotypes resulting from haploinsufficiency (HI) are due to the loss of one allele. Recent studies in budding yeast have shown that HI originates from insufficient protein levels or from a stoichiometric imbalance between subunits of protein complexes. In humans, however, HI often involves transcription factors. Therefore, the species differences in HI and the molecular mechanisms of species-specific HI remain under investigation. In this study, HI in fission yeast was systematically surveyed. HI in fission yeast affected genes related to signaling and to basic cellular processes, as observed in budding yeast. These results suggest that there are species differences in HI and that the HI that occurs in fission yeast is intermediate to and HI in budding yeast and humans.
    Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology 07/2008; 18(6):1059-63. · 1.40 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

692 Citations
219.63 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1996–2014
    • Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology KRIBB
      • • Aging Research Center
      • • Research Center of Integrative Cellunomics
      • • Omics and Integration Research Center
      • • Functional Genomics Research Center
      • • Genome Research Center
      Anzan, Gyeonggi Province, South Korea
  • 1999
    • Seoul National University
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea