Jingyue Bao

Beijing Genomics Institute, Bao'an, Guangdong, China

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Publications (14)137.95 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Important biological and pathologic properties are often conserved across species. Although several mouse leukemia models have been well established, the genes deregulated in both human and murine leukemia cells have not been studied systematically. We performed a serial analysis of gene expression in both human and murine MLL-ELL or MLL-ENL leukemia cells and identified 88 genes that seemed to be significantly deregulated in both types of leukemia cells, including 57 genes not reported previously as being deregulated in MLL-associated leukemias. These changes were validated by quantitative PCR. The most up-regulated genes include several HOX genes (e.g., HOX A5, HOXA9, and HOXA10) and MEIS1, which are the typical hallmark of MLL rearrangement leukemia. The most down-regulated genes include LTF, LCN2, MMP9, S100A8, S100A9, PADI4, TGFBI, and CYBB. Notably, the up-regulated genes are enriched in gene ontology terms, such as gene expression and transcription, whereas the down-regulated genes are enriched in signal transduction and apoptosis. We showed that the CpG islands of the down-regulated genes are hypermethylated. We also showed that seven individual microRNAs (miRNA) from the mir-17-92 cluster, which are overexpressed in human MLL rearrangement leukemias, are also consistently overexpressed in mouse MLL rearrangement leukemia cells. Nineteen possible targets of these miRNAs were identified, and two of them (i.e., APP and RASSF2) were confirmed further by luciferase reporter and mutagenesis assays. The identification and validation of consistent changes of gene expression in human and murine MLL rearrangement leukemias provide important insights into the genetic base for MLL-associated leukemogenesis.
    Cancer Research 02/2009; 69(3):1109-16. · 9.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Arabidopsis and rice are the only two model plants whose finished phase genome sequence has been completed. Here we report the construction of an oligomer microarray based on the presently known and predicted gene models in the rice genome. This microarray was used to analyze the transcriptional activity of the gene models in representative rice organ types. Expression of 86% of the 41,754 known and predicted gene models was detected. A significant fraction of these expressed gene models are organized into chromosomal regions, about 100 kb in length, that exhibit a coexpression pattern. Compared with similar genome-wide surveys of the Arabidopsis transcriptome, our results indicate that similar proportions of the two genomes are expressed in their corresponding organ types. A large percentage of the rice gene models that lack significant Arabidopsis homologs are expressed. Furthermore, the expression patterns of rice and Arabidopsis best-matched homologous genes in distinct functional groups indicate dramatic differences in their degree of conservation between the two species. Thus, this initial comparative analysis reveals some basic similarities and differences between the Arabidopsis and rice transcriptomes.
    Genome Research 10/2005; 15(9):1274-83. · 14.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Using the serial analysis of gene expression technique, we surveyed transcriptomes of three major tissues (panicles, leaves, and roots) of a super-hybrid rice (Oryza sativa) strain, LYP9, in comparison to its parental cultivars, 93-11 (indica) and PA64s (japonica). We acquired 465,679 tags from the serial analysis of gene expression libraries, which were consolidated into 68,483 unique tags. Focusing our initial functional analyses on a subset of the data that are supported by full-length cDNAs and the tags (genes) differentially expressed in the hybrid at a significant level (P<0.01), we identified 595 up-regulated (22 tags in panicles, 228 in leaves, and 345 in roots) and 25 down-regulated (seven tags in panicles, 15 in leaves, and three in roots) in LYP9. Most of the tag-identified and up-regulated genes were found related to enhancing carbon- and nitrogen-assimilation, including photosynthesis in leaves, nitrogen uptake in roots, and rapid growth in both roots and panicles. Among the down-regulated genes in LYP9, there is an essential enzyme in photorespiration, alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase 1. Our study adds a new set of data crucial for the understanding of molecular mechanisms of heterosis and gene regulation networks of the cultivated rice.
    Plant physiology 08/2005; 138(3):1216-31. · 6.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Increasing evidence suggests that low-abundant transcripts may play fundamental roles in biological processes. In an attempt to estimate the prevalence of low-abundant transcripts in eukaryotic genomes, we performed a transcriptome analysis in Drosophila using the SAGE technique. We collected 244,313 SAGE tags from transcripts expressed in Drosophila embryonic, larval, pupae, adult, and testicular tissue. From these SAGE tags, we identified 40,823 unique SAGE tags. Our analysis showed that 55% of the 40,823 unique SAGE tags are novel without matches in currently known Drosophila transcripts, and most of the novel SAGE tags have low copy numbers. Further analysis indicated that these novel SAGE tags represent novel low-abundant transcripts expressed from loci outside of currently annotated exons including the intergenic and intronic regions, and antisense of the currently annotated exons in the Drosophila genome. Our study reveals the presence of a significant number of novel low-abundant transcripts in Drosophila, and highlights the need to isolate these novel low-abundant transcripts for further biological studies.
    RNA 07/2005; 11(6):939-46. · 5.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: DNA microarray was used as a tool to investigate genome-wide transcriptional responses of Yersinia pestis to hyperosmotic and high-salinity stress. Hyperosmotic stress specifically upregulated genes responsible for ABC-type transport and the cytoplasmic accumulation of certain polysaccharides, while high-salinity stress induced the transcription of genes encoding partition proteins and several global transcriptional regulators. Genes whose transcription was enhanced by both kinds of stress comprised those encoding osmoprotectant transport systems and a set of virulence determinants. The number of genes downregulated by the two kinds of stress was much lower than that of upregulated genes, suggesting that neither kind of stress severely depresses cellular processes in general. Many differentially regulated genes still exist whose functions remain unknown. Y. pestis recognized high-salinity and hyperosmotic stress as different kinds of environmental stimuli, and different mechanisms enabled acclimation to these two kinds of stress, although Y. pestis still executed common mechanisms to accommodate both types of stress.
    Research in Microbiology 05/2005; 156(3):403-15. · 2.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: DNA microarray was used as a tool to define the heat- and cold-shock stimulons in Yersinia pestis. Heat shock dramatically enhanced the transcription of genes encoding major heat-shock proteins (MHSPs) that are important for cell survival against the heat. Many other genes were also greatly up-regulated, but their roles in heat-shock response need to be elucidated. Meanwhile, heat shock retarded most of the metabolic processes, i.e. RNA transcription, protein translation, aerobic respiration, energy metabolism, small molecule metabolism, peptidoglycan biosynthesis, sulfate uptake and cysteine biosynthesis. In response to cold shock, Y. pestis has evolved complex adaptive mechanisms by elevating the transcription of a specific set of genes whose protein products are designed to prevent or eliminate cold-induced DNA or RNA structuring, to remodel cell membrane components for maintenance of normal functions, to elevate the energy generation for ensuring ATP-dependent responses during cold adaptation and to synthesize or transport compatible solutes such as cryoprotectants, and at the same time, by repressing the mRNA level of certain genes whose protein products are not needed for bacterial growth at low temperatures, such as the MHSPs. These results provide a set of new candidate genes for hypothesis-based investigations of their roles in stress response, host adaptation and pathogenicity of this deadly pathogen.
    Microbes and Infection 04/2005; 7(3):335-48. · 2.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report improved whole-genome shotgun sequences for the genomes of indica and japonica rice, both with multimegabase contiguity, or almost 1,000-fold improvement over the drafts of 2002. Tested against a nonredundant collection of 19,079 full-length cDNAs, 97.7% of the genes are aligned, without fragmentation, to the mapped super-scaffolds of one or the other genome. We introduce a gene identification procedure for plants that does not rely on similarity to known genes to remove erroneous predictions resulting from transposable elements. Using the available EST data to adjust for residual errors in the predictions, the estimated gene count is at least 38,000-40,000. Only 2%-3% of the genes are unique to any one subspecies, comparable to the amount of sequence that might still be missing. Despite this lack of variation in gene content, there is enormous variation in the intergenic regions. At least a quarter of the two sequences could not be aligned, and where they could be aligned, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rates varied from as little as 3.0 SNP/kb in the coding regions to 27.6 SNP/kb in the transposable elements. A more inclusive new approach for analyzing duplication history is introduced here. It reveals an ancient whole-genome duplication, a recent segmental duplication on Chromosomes 11 and 12, and massive ongoing individual gene duplications. We find 18 distinct pairs of duplicated segments that cover 65.7% of the genome; 17 of these pairs date back to a common time before the divergence of the grasses. More important, ongoing individual gene duplications provide a never-ending source of raw material for gene genesis and are major contributors to the differences between members of the grass family.
    PLoS Biology 03/2005; 3(2):e38. · 12.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The sequence of the human genome encodes the genetic instructions for human physiology, as well as rich information about human evolution. In 2001, the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium reported a draft sequence of the euchromatic portion of the human genome. Since then, the international collaboration has worked to convert this draft into a genome sequence with high accuracy and nearly complete coverage. Here, we report the result of this finishing process. The current genome sequence (Build 35) contains 2.85 billion nucleotides interrupted by only 341 gaps. It covers approximately 99% of the euchromatic genome and is accurate to an error rate of approximately 1 event per 100,000 bases. Many of the remaining euchromatic gaps are associated with segmental duplications and will require focused work with new methods. The near-complete sequence, the first for a vertebrate, greatly improves the precision of biological analyses of the human genome including studies of gene number, birth and death. Notably, the human genome seems to encode only 20,000-25,000 protein-coding genes. The genome sequence reported here should serve as a firm foundation for biomedical research in the decades ahead.
    Nature 10/2004; 431:931-945. · 38.60 Impact Factor
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    Nature 10/2004; 431(7011):931-945. · 38.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genomics research provides an unprecedented opportunity for us to probe into the pathogenicity and evolution of the world's most deadly pathogenic bacterium, Yersinia pestis, in minute detail. In our present work, extensive microarray analysis in conjunction with PCR validation revealed that there are considerable genome dynamics, due to gene acquisition and loss, in natural populations of Y. pestis. We established a genomotyping system to group homologous isolates of Y. pestis, based on profiling or gene acquisition and loss in their genomes, and then drew an outline of parallel microevolution of the Y. pestis genome. The acquisition of a number of genomic islands and plasmids most likely induced Y. pestis to evolve rapidly from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis to a new, deadly pathogen. Horizontal gene acquisition also plays a key role in the dramatic evolutionary segregation of Y. pestis lineages (biovars and genomovars). In contrast to selective genome expansion by gene acquisition, genome reduction occurs in Y. pestis through the loss of DNA regions. We also theorized about the links between niche adaptation and genome microevolution. The transmission, colonization, and expansion of Y. pestis in the natural foci of endemic plague are parallel and directional and involve gradual adaptation to the complex of interactions between the environment, the hosts, and the pathogen itself. These adaptations are based on the natural selections against the accumulation of genetic changes within genome. Our data strongly support that the modern plague originated from Yunnan Province in China, due to the arising of biovar orientalis from biovar antiqua rather than mediaevalis.
    Journal of Bacteriology 09/2004; 186(15):5138-46. · 3.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Yersinia pestis, the etiologic agent of plague, must acclimatize itself to temperature shifts between the temperature (26 C) for flea blockage and the body temperature (37 C) of warm-blooded hosts during its life cycle. Here a whole-genome DNA microarray was used to investigate transcriptional regulation upon the upshift of growth temperature from 26 to 37 C in a chemically defined medium. Four hundred and one genes were regulated differentially under the two temperatures. About 39% of these genes were up-regulated at 37 C, whereas 61% were down-regulated. Temperature-induced changes occurred at the level of transcription of genes encoding proven or predicted virulence factors, regulators, metabolism-associated proteins, prophages, and hypothetical proteins. Strikingly, many gene clusters displayed a co-transcription pattern in response to temperature upshift. Our data provided a genome-wide profile of gene transcription induced by temperature shift and should shed light on the pathogenicity and host-microbe interaction of this deadly pathogen.
    Microbiology and Immunology 02/2004; 48(11):791-805. · 1.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report a complete genomic sequence of rare isolates (minor genotype) of the SARS-CoV from SARS patients in Guangdong, China, where the first few cases emerged. The most striking discovery from the isolate is an extra 29-nucleotide sequence located at the nucleotide positions between 27,863 and 27,864 (referred to the complete sequence of BJ01) within an overlapped region composed of BGI-PUP5 (BGI-postulated uncharacterized protein 5) and BGI-PUP6 upstream of the N (nucleocapsid) protein. The discovery of this minor genotype, GD-Ins29, suggests a significant genetic event and differentiates it from the previously reported genotype, the dominant form among all sequenced SARS-CoV isolates. A 17-nt segment of this extra sequence is identical to a segment of the same size in two human mRNA sequences that may interfere with viral replication and transcription in the cytosol of the infected cells. It provides a new avenue for the exploration of the virus-host interaction in viral evolution, host pathogenesis, and vaccine development.
    Genomics Proteomics & Bioinformatics 06/2003; 1(2):101-7.
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    ABSTRACT: Heme is a key cofactor in aerobic life, both in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Because of the high reactivity of ferrous protoporphyrin IX, the reactions of heme in cells are often carried out through heme-protein complexes. Traditionally studies of heme-binding proteins have been approached on a case by case basis, thus there is a limited global view of the distribution of heme-binding proteins in different cells or tissues. The procedure described here is aimed at profiling heme-binding proteins in mouse tissues sequentially by 1) purification of heme-binding proteins by heme-agarose, an affinity chromatographic resin; 2) isolation of heme-binding proteins by SDS-PAGE or two-dimensional electrophoresis; 3) identification of heme-binding proteins by mass spectrometry. In five mouse tissues, over 600 protein spots were visualized on 2-DE gel stained by Commassie blue and 154 proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF, in which most proteins belong to heme related. This methodology makes it possible to globally characterize the heme-binding proteins in a biological system.
    Genomics Proteomics & Bioinformatics 03/2003; 1(1):78-86.
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    ABSTRACT: Nucleoporin 155 (Nup155) is a major component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) involved in cellular nucleo-cytoplasmic transport. We have acquired the complete sequence and interpreted the genomic organization of the Nup155 orthologos from human (Homo sapiens) and pufferfish (Fugu rubripes), which are approximately 80 and 8 kb in length, respectively. The human gene is ubiquitously expressed in many tissues analyzed and has two major transcript variants, resulted from an alternative usage of the 5' cryptic or consensus splice donor in intron 1 and two polyadenylation signals. We have also cloned DNA complementary to RNAs of the Nup155 orthologs from Fugu and mouse. Comparative analysis of the Nup155 orthologs in many species, including H. sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, F. rubripes, Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has revealed two paralogs in S. cerevisiae but only a single gene with increasing number of introns in more complex organisms. The amino acid sequences of the Nup155 orthologos are highly conserved in the evolution of eukaryotes. Different gene orders in the human and Fugu genomic regions harboring the Nup155 orthologs advocate cautious interpretation of synteny in comparative genomic analysis even within the vertebrate lineage.
    Gene 05/2002; 288(1-2):9-18. · 2.20 Impact Factor