D Segerbäck

Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Stockholm, Sweden

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Publications (40)111.16 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: High concentrations of propylene oxide (PO) induced inflammation in the respiratory nasal mucosa (RNM) of rodents. Concentrations > or =300 ppm caused nasal tumors. In order to investigate if glutathione depletion could be relevant for these effects, we determined in PO exposed male Fischer 344/N rats PO in blood and soluble nonprotein SH-groups (NPSH) in RNM and other tissues. Rats were exposed once (6 h) to PO concentrations between 0 and 750 ppm, and repeatedly for up to 20 days (6 h, 5 days/week) to concentrations between 0 and 500 ppm. At the end of the exposures, PO in blood and NPSH in tissues were determined. PO in blood was dependent on concentration and duration of exposure. After the 1-day exposures, NPSH depletion was most distinctive (RNM > liver > lung). Compared to controls, NPSH levels were 43% at 50 ppm PO in RNM and 16% at > or =300 ppm in both RNM and liver. Lung NPSH fell linearly to 20% at 750 ppm. After repeated exposures over 3 and 20 days to 5, 25, 50, 300, and 500 ppm, NPSH losses were less pronounced. At both time points, NPSH were 90%, 70%, 50%, 30%, and 30% of the control values in RNM. Liver NPSH decreased to 80% and 50% at 300 and 500 ppm, respectively. After 20 days, lung NPSH declined to 70% (300 ppm) and 50% (500 ppm). We conclude that continuous, severe perturbation of GSH in RNM following repeated high PO exposures may lead to inflammatory lesions and cell proliferation, critical steps on the path towards tumorigenicity.
    Toxicological Sciences 02/2005; 83(1):177-89. · 4.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation has a broad spectrum of biological effects and a capacity to initiate skin carcinogenesis through DNA damage. The effect of different wave bands of UV light on the production of DNA damage in human skin in situ was studied with a broadband UV-B lamp TL-12 and a narrowband UV-B lamp TL-01. Eight psoriasis patients participated in the study. Their minimal erythema dose was assessed separately for the two UV-B wave band ranges. Test areas of buttock skin were irradiated with the two spectrally differing lamps using erythemally equivalent UV doses of 40 and 80 mJ/cm2 CIE (Commission International de I'Eclairage). Punch biopsies were taken from the irradiated areas, and UV-induced DNA lesions (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, CPDs) in the skin were analyzed with a 32P high-performance liquid chromatography postlabelling method. No UV source-dependent differences in the induced levels of CPDs were detected in this study. CPD production with broadband TL-12 and narrowband TL-01 UV-B lamps in situ did not differ when erythemally equivalent UV doses were used. The preliminary result needs to be confirmed in a larger study.
    Photodermatology Photoimmunology and Photomedicine 01/2004; 19(6):281-6. · 1.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The main purpose of the study was to establish the relation between exposure dose of propylene oxide (PO) and dose in various tissues of male F344 rats exposed to the compound by inhalation. The animals were exposed to 0, 5, 25, 50, 300, or 500 ppm PO in the air for 3 days (6 h/day) or 4 weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week). Blood, nasal respiratory epithelium, lung, and liver were collected. 2-Hydroxypropylvaline (HPVal) in hemoglobin was quantified using the N-alkyl Edman method and gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. 7-(2-Hydroxypropyl)guanine (7-HPG) in DNA was quantified using (32)P postlabeling. The levels of 7-HPG in DNA of nasal respiratory epithelium and lung increased linearly with concentration as measured both after 3 days and 4 weeks of exposure. Similarly, 7-HPG in liver DNA and HPVal in hemoglobin showed a linear increase with PO concentration in the 3-day exposure group, whereas a deviation from linearity was observed above 300 ppm in the 4-week exposure group. The new results confirm previous observations of a dose difference between tissues with the highest dose present in the nasal respiratory epithelium. The measured adduct levels were used for calculation of adduct increments and corresponding tissue doses per unit of external exposure dose. For this purpose, the buildup of adducts was modeled considering the different kinetics of formation and elimination of adducts with DNA and hemoglobin, respectively, and also considering the increasing body weight of the animals. The half-life of 7-HPG in vivo, as well as tissue doses, could be solved from DNA adduct data at the 3rd and 26th days. Within the range of concentrations where the dose-response curves for adduct formation are linear, the relationship between exposure dose and resulting tissue doses could be based equally well on adduct data from the short-term exposure as on adduct data from the prolonged exposure.
    Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology 10/2003; 191(3):245-54. · 3.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ethylene oxide (EO) and propylene oxide (PO) are direct acting mutagens with high Swain-Scott s-values, which indicate that they react preferentially with ring nitrogens in the DNA. We have previously described that in the X-linked recessive lethal (RL) assay in Drosophila postmeiotic male germ cells EO is, per unit exposure dose, 5-10 times more mutagenic than PO. Furthermore, at the higher dose range of EO tested, 62.5-1000 ppm, up to 20-fold enhanced mutation rates were measured in the absence of maternal nucleotide excision repair (NER) compared to repair proficient conditions. The lower dose range of EO tested, 2-7.8 ppm, still produced a small increased mutation rate but without a significant elevated effect when the NER system is being suppressed. The lowest dose of PO tested, 15.6 ppm, produced only in NER- condition an increased mutation rate. The aim of the present study was to compare the mutagenic effect of EO and PO in the RL assay under XPG proficient and deficient conditions with the formation of N-7-(2-hydroxyethyl)guanine (7-HEG) and N-7-(2-hydroxypropyl)guanine (7-HPG), respectively, the major DNA adducts formed. The formation of 7-HEG and 7-HPG was investigated in Drosophila males exposed to EO and PO as a measure of internal dose for exposures ranging from 2 to 1000 or 2000 ppm, respectively, for 24h. Analysis of 7-HEG and 7-HPG, using a highly sensitive 32P-postlabelling assay, showed a linear increase of adduct levels over the entire dose range. The non-linear dose-response relationship for mutations could therefore not be explained by a reduced inhalation or increased detoxification at higher exposure levels. In analogy with the four times higher reactivity of EO the level of N-7-guanine alkylation per ppm was for EO 3.5-fold higher than that for PO. Per unit N-7-guanine alkylation EO was found to be slightly more mutagenic than PO, whereas PO was the more potent clastogenic agent. While this research has not identified the DNA lesions that cause the increase in repair deficient flies, it supports the hypothesis that efficient error-free repair of some N-alkylation products can explain why these agents tend to be weakly genotoxic or even inactive in repair-competent (premeiotic) germ cells of the mouse and the Drosophila fly.
    Mutation Research/Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis 09/2003; 529(1-2):95-107. · 3.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The numbers of melanocytic nevi, localized benign proliferations of melanocytes, have been shown to be associated with an increased risk for development of melanoma. In the present study we have developed an alternative post-labelling method for determination of levels of cyclobutane thymidine dimers (T=T) as dinucleotides at sensitivities sufficient for analysis of human skin samples. Using the developed method, the induction of T=T was determined in melanocytic nevi in situ and surrounding skin, obtained from seven subjects, after exposure to solar simulating radiation. The T=T level in nevi was found to be 1- to 4.5-fold lower than that in surrounding skin and the difference was statistically significant (Student's t-test, P < 0.05).
    Mutagenesis 05/2002; 17(3):189-91. · 3.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Propylene oxide (PO), a simple alkylating agent used in the chemical industry, is weakly genotoxic and induces nasal cavity tumors in rodents on inhalation at high air concentrations. DNA adducts, hemoglobin adducts, and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) were analyzed as biomarkers of exposure in a group of eight PO-exposed workers and eight nonexposed subjects. 1-2-Hydroxypropyladenine (1-HP-adenine) in DNA of WBCs was analyzed using a hypersensitive (32)P-postlabeling assay. HP-valine in hemoglobin was measured using gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Air measurements indicated PO levels in the range of 1-7 ppm. All three biomarkers showed significantly increased levels in the exposed workers. 1-HP-adenine was recorded in seven of the exposed workers (mean 0.66 mol/10(9) mol nucleotides) but was not detected in any of the control subjects. HP-valine was found in all subjects (means of 2.7 and 0.006 pmol/mg globin in exposed workers and controls, respectively). The average frequencies of SCE were 3.7/cell in exposed workers and 2.0/cell in controls, respectively. DNA and hemoglobin adducts were correlated (r = 0.887), as well as DNA adducts and SCE (r = 0.792) and hemoglobin adducts and SCE (r = 0.762). The present study is the first demonstrating PO-DNA adducts in human individuals. It is also the first study indicating cytogenetic effects in humans from PO exposure, although confounding effects from other sources cannot be excluded.
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers &amp Prevention 04/2002; 11(3):315-8. · 4.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Epichlorohydrin (ECH) is a simple 3-carbon epoxide of industrial importance. It has been shown to be genotoxic in several systems and carcinogenic in experimental animals. The aim of the present investigation was to study DNA adducts of ECH as a biomarker of occupational exposure to this chemical. 7-(3-Chloro-2-hydroxypropyl)guanine (7-CHP-guanine) was analysed in DNA from white blood cells using an anion exchange-based adduct enrichment protocol of the (32)P-post-labelling/HPLC-based assay. Blood samples were collected from seven workers handling ECH (exposed), nine workers not handling ECH but normally present in the premises where this chemical is used (potentially exposed) and 13 office and factory workers from locations in the plant where ECH is not handled (controls). 7-CHP-guanine was detected in five of the seven workers exposed to ECH (1.6-7.1 mol/10(9) mol nucleotides) and in two of the nine workers potentially exposed to ECH (0.8-1.5 mol/10(9) mol nucleotides). This adduct was not detected in any of the 13 controls. The difference in adduct levels between exposed workers and controls was statistically significant (Mann-Whitney test, P < 0.001), as was the difference between exposed workers and potentially exposed workers (P = 0.017). The recovery of 7-CHP-guanine in the (32)P-post-labelling assay was on average 48 +/- 7%, which is considerably higher than previously reported for other 7-alkylguanines. The method used had a limit of detection of approximately 0.4 mol adduct/10(9) mol nucleotides using 20 microg DNA. This study shows for the first time ECH-induced DNA adducts in humans and suggests that 7-CHP-guanine may be used as a biomarker of occupational exposure to ECH.
    Carcinogenesis 02/2000; 21(2):275-80. · 5.64 Impact Factor
  • H L Pérez, D Segerbäck, S Osterman-Golkar
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    ABSTRACT: Hemoglobin adducts have been used to assess exposure to carcinogenic compounds in tobacco smoke. However, because of background levels in nonsmokers, most adducts that have been studied are not useful for monitoring low-level exposure. Bergmark [(1997) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 10, 78-84] showed that the level of adducts of acrylonitrile (AN) with N-terminal valine (ANVal) increases with increasing cigarette consumption, and the increment from 1 cigarette/day was estimated to be 8 pmol/g of globin. The background level of ANVal in nonsmokers was not quantified (<2 pmol/g of globin). The objective of this study was to determine the background level of ANVal in hemoglobin and to study the stability of this adduct in vivo. Globin samples previously analyzed by Bergmark from 17 nonsmokers and 2 smokers were reanalyzed in the study presented here. Globin samples from 7 additional nonsmokers and from 10 participants in a smoking cessation program were also analyzed. Smoking habits and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) were assessed by interview. Only two of the participants completed the program. The levels of ANVal in these 2 subjects decreased after quitting and were at background level by 126 days. The time course of the decrease was compatible with removal of stable adducts. The levels of ANVal in the nonsmokers were 0.76 +/- 0.36 (mean +/- SD) (n = 18; reporting no exposure ETS), 1.1 +/- 0.6 (n = 3; reporting exposure to ETS), and 1. 2 +/- 0.5 pmol/g of globin (n = 3; snuff users). Thus, the adduct level in nonsmokers corresponds to the adduct increment from about 0. 1 cigarette/day. Measurements of the level of ANVal could be used to distinguish between nonsmokers and low-level smokers on an individual level, but larger groups of individuals would be required to detect a possible contribution to the background from passive smoking.
    Chemical Research in Toxicology 11/1999; 12(10):869-73. · 3.67 Impact Factor
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    K Plna, R Nilsson, M Koskinen, D Segerbäck
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    ABSTRACT: Propylene oxide, a widely used monofunctional alkylating agent, has been shown to be genotoxic in in vitro test systems and induces tumors in the nasal tissues of experimental animals. Propylene oxide, like related alkylating agents, forms several different adducts with DNA bases, but predominantly at the 7-position of guanine. We have previously described the in vitro and in vivo formation and stability of this major adduct. The aim of the present study was to perform a similar investigation of other adducts of propylene oxide. 1-(2-Hydroxypropyl)adenine (1-HP-adenine) and 3-(2-hydroxypropyl)cytosine (3-HP-cytosine), as well as their rearrangement products to N(6)-(2-hydroxypropyl)adenine (N(6)-HP-adenine) and 3-(2-hydroxypropyl)uracil (3-HP-uracil), respectively, were analysed by a very sensitive (32)P-postlabelling method involving nuclease P1 enhancement and radioisotope detector-coupled HPLC separation. All four adducts could be detected in DNA treated in vitro with propylene oxide. The sum of the levels of 1- and N(6)-HP-adenine amounted to 3.5% and the sum of 3-HP-cytosine and 3-HP-uracil to 1.7%, respectively, of 7-(2-hydroxypropyl)guanine (7-HP-guanine). In male Fischer 344 rats exposed to 500 p.p.m. propylene oxide by inhalation for 20 days, 1-HP-adenine was detected in all analysed tissues, including nasal epithelium, lung and lymphocytes, whereas N(6)-HP-adenine was only found in the tissues of the nasal cavities. The highest level of 1-HP-adenine (2.0 mol/10(6) mol of normal nucleotides, i.e. 2% of 7-HP-guanine) was found in the respiratory nasal epithelium, which also represents the major target for tumour induction in the rat following inhalation of propylene oxide. The levels of this adduct in the lung and in the lymphocytes were considerably lower, amounting to 15 and 9%, respectively, of that of the respiratory nasal epithelium. In rats killed 3 days after cessation of exposure, practically no decrease in 1-HP-adenine was observed, indicating no or very slow repair. 3-HP-uracil could only be detected in the respiratory nasal epithelia of propylene-exposed rats and its concentration was as low as 0.02 mol/10(6) mol of normal nucleotides (0.02% of 7-HP-guanine). Since 3-HP-uracil was chemically much more stable than the latter, the obtained animal data suggest repair of the cytosine and/or uracil adducts. Incubation of propylene oxide-reacted DNA with a protein extract from mammalian cells indicated that an enzymatic repair mechanism exists for removal of 3-HP-cytosine, but not for 3-HP-uracil or 1- and N(6)-HP-adenine. Another finding was that uracil glycosylase is probably not involved. The level of 1-HP-adenine in the propylene oxide-exposed rats was approximately 50 times lower than that of 7-HP-guanine. Nevertheless, this adduct is conveniently analysed and has high chemical stability and recovery, which results in high sensitivity (detection limit 0.3 mol/10(9) mol of normal nucleotides using 10 microgram DNA). 1-HP-adenine might, therefore, be considered as an alternative to 7-HP-guanine for monitoring exposure to propylene oxide.
    Carcinogenesis 11/1999; 20(10):2025-32. · 5.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Epichlorohydrin (1-chloro-2,3-epoxypropane; ECH) is an important industrial chemical and a carcinogen in experimental animals. The main aims of the present study were to characterize the adduct formation in female Wistar rats and to identify adducts that could potentially be used in human biomonitoring studies. The total binding of radioactivity to haemoglobin in rats administered 0, 0. 11, 0.22, 0.43, or 0.97 mmol [3H]ECH/kg body weight by i.p. injection, and sacrificed 24 h after treatment, was linearly related to a dose up to 0.43 mmol/kg body weight. The binding at the highest dose was higher than predicted by extrapolation from lower doses, indicating saturation of a metabolic process for elimination of ECH. Ion-exchange chromatography of a globin hydrolysate showed one major radioactivity peak corresponding to S-(3-chloro-2-hydroxypropyl)cysteine. The half-life of this adduct was estimated as about 4 days by analysis of globin from rats administered 0.43 mmol/kg body weight and sacrificed after 1, 2 and 9 days. Crosslinking of the adduct, presumably with glutathione, appeared to be the predominant secondary reaction. Hydrolysis of N-(3-chloro-2-hydroxypropyl)valine, the primary reaction product of ECH with N-terminal valine, would give N-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)valine. A sensitive gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method for the dihydroxypropyl adduct was used to follow its formation and removal after administration of nonlabelled ECH (0.11 mmol/kg body weight). The level of this adduct reached a maximum of about 20 pmol/g globin after a few weeks, corresponding to about 0.1% of the initial binding of ECH to globin. N-7-(3-Chloro-2-hydroxypropyl)guanine was detected in rats administered 0.97 mmol [3H]ECH/kg body weight and sacrificed 6 h after treatment. The adduct levels in haemoglobin and DNA were compared with previously reported adduct levels in male Fischer 344 rats exposed to propylene oxide. Despite its higher chemical reactivity, the capacity of ECH to alkylate macromolecules in vivo was found to be somewhat lower than that of propylene oxide.
    Chemico-Biological Interactions 02/1999; 117(1):49-64. · 2.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: 7-(2-Hydroxypropyl)guanine (7-HPG) constitutes the major adduct from alkylation of DNA by the genotoxic carcinogen, propylene oxide. The levels of 7-HPG in DNA of various organs provides a relevant measure of tissue dose. 7-Alkylguanines can induce mutation through abasic sites formed from spontaneous depurination of the adduct. In the current study the formation of 7-HPG was investigated in male Fisher 344 rats exposed to 500 ppm of propylene oxide by inhalation for 6 h/day, 5 days/week, for up to 20 days. 7-HPG was analyzed using the 32P-postlabelling assay with anion-exchange cartridges for adduct enrichment. In animals sacrificed directly following 20 days of exposure, the adduct level was highest in the respiratory nasal epithelium (98.1 adducts per 10(6) nucleotides), followed by olfactory nasal epithelium (58.5), lung (16.3), lymphocytes (9.92), spleen (9.26), liver (4.64), and testis (2.95). The nasal cavity is the major target for tumor induction in the rat following inhalation. This finding is consistent with the major difference in adduct levels observed in nasal epithelium compared to other tissues. In rats sacrificed 3 days after cessation of exposure, the levels of 7-HPG in the aforementioned tissues had, on the average, decreased by about one-quarter of their initial concentrations. This degree of loss closely corresponds to the spontaneous rate of depurination for this adduct (t 1/2 = 120 h), and suggests a low efficiency of repair for 7-HPG in the rat. The postlabelling assay used had a detection limit of one to two adducts per 10(8) nucleotides, i.e. it is likely that this adduct could be analyzed in nasal tissues of rats exposed to less than 1 ppm of propylene oxide.
    Chemico-Biological Interactions 11/1998; 115(3):229-46. · 2.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The results from mutagenic and carcinogenic studies of propylene oxide (PO) and the current efforts to develop molecular dosimetry methods for PO-DNA adducts are reviewed. PO has been shown to be active in several bacterial and mammalian mutagenicity tests and induces site of contact tumors in rodents after long-term administration. Quantitation of N7-(2-hydroxypropyl)guanine (7-HPG) in nasal and hepatic tissues of male F344 rats exposed to 500 ppm PO (6 h/day; 5 days/week for 4 weeks) by inhalation was performed to evaluate the potential of high concentrations of PO to produce adducts in the DNA of rodent tissues and to obtain information necessary for the design of molecular dosimetry studies. The persistence of 7-HPG in nasal and hepatic tissues was studied in rats killed three days after cessation of a 4-week exposure period. DNA samples from exposed and untreated animals were analyzed for 7-HPG by two different methods. The first method consisted of separation of the adduct from DNA by neutral thermal hydrolysis, followed by electrophoretic derivatization of the adduct and gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS) analysis. The second method utilized 32P-postlabeling to quantitate the amount of this adduct in rat tissues. Adducts present in tissues from rats killed immediately after cessation of exposure were 835.4 +/- 80.1 (respiratory), 396.8 +/- 53.1 (olfactory) and 34.6 +/- 3.0 (liver) pmol adduct/mumol guanine using GC-HRMS. Lower values, 592.7 +/- 53.3, 296.5 +/- 32.6 and 23.2 +/- 0.6 pmol adduct/mumol guanine were found in respiratory, olfactory and hepatic tissues of rats killed after three days of recovery. Analysis of the tissues by 32P-postlabeling yielded the following values: 445.7 +/- 8.0 (respiratory), 301.6 +/- 49.2 (olfactory) and 20.6 +/- 1.8 (liver) pmol adduct/mumol guanine in DNA of rats killed immediately after exposure cessation and 327.1 +/- 21.7 (respiratory), 185.3 +/- 29.2 (olfactory) and 15.7 +/- 0.9 (liver) pmol adduct/mumol guanine after recovery. Current methods of quantitation did not provide evidence for the endogenous formation of this adduct in control animals. These studies demonstrated that the target tissue for carcinogenesis has much greater alkylation of DNA than liver, a tissue that did not exhibit a carcinogenic response.
    Mutation Research/Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis 11/1997; 380(1-2):179-97. · 3.90 Impact Factor
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    K Plna, D Segerbäck
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    ABSTRACT: 32P-Postlabelling analysis of allyl glycidyl ether-treated DNA after adduct enrichment on anion-exchange cartridges revealed two major and one minor DNA adducts. The major adducts were shown to originate from alkylation at N-7-guanine and N-1-adenine, respectively, while the minor adduct was at N-3-cytosine. In addition, rearrangement products of the 1-adenine and 3-cytosine adducts to N6-adenine and 3-uracil were indicated. The relative amounts of adenine, cytosine and uracil products appeared to be dependent upon conditions (in particular pH) during sample processing and analysis. When nuclease P1 was used for adduct enrichment the adenine, cytosine and uracil adducts, but not the 7-guanine adduct, were detected. The labelling efficiency of the 7-guanine adduct standard was 40-45%. Total recovery of this adduct from allyl glycidyl ether-modified DNA was 9-12%. The labelling efficiency of the 1-adenine adduct standard was 78-82%. Total recovery of this adduct from DNA was approximately 20% when using anion-exchange chromatography for adduct enrichment and 30-34% when using nuclease P1. Preliminary analysis of DNA from mice treated with allyl glycidyl ether indicated 57 times higher level of the 7-guanine adduct, per unit dose, in skin DNA (120 per 10(8) normal nucleotides) after topical application when compared to liver DNA after i.p. administration. The 1-adenine adduct could not be quantified in liver DNA (due to an interfering background product present in untreated animals) and the level of the 3-cytosine adduct was below the detection limit of the method. After topical application the level of the 1 adenine adduct in skin DNA was approximately 30 per 10(8), using either column or nuclease P1 enrichment. The 3-cytosine adduct was detected in skin, but was not quantified.
    Carcinogenesis 09/1997; 18(8):1457-62. · 5.64 Impact Factor
  • Kamila Plna, Dan Segerbäck
    Mutation Research-fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis - MUTAT RES-FUNDAM MOL MECH MUT. 01/1997; 379(1).
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    K Plna, D Segerbäck, E K Schweda
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    ABSTRACT: Glycidyl ethers are reactive epoxides used as components of a variety of epoxy materials. These compounds are known to cause allergic reactions, but since they are generally also genotoxic it would be of interest to evaluate the risk for induction of such effects. Reaction products of allyl glycidyl ether with nucleic acid components were therefore studied. Adduct standards of expected major products in DNA were prepared and assigned to N-7-guanine, N-1- and N-3-adenine and N-3-cytosine. The adducts were characterized by UV spectroscopy, and the adduct to N-1-adenine also by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In analogy with the formation of corresponding reaction products of other simple epoxides the N-1-adenine adduct rearranged in a base catalysed reaction to N6 and the N-3-cytosine adduct deaminated to form the corresponding N-3-uracil adduct. For allyl glycidyl ether these further reactions of the N-1-adenine and N-3-cytosine adducts were, however, slower than has been observed for corresponding products of other epoxides, but faster than for methylated and ethylated products. In double-stranded salmon testis DNA treated in vitro with allyl glycidyl ether, the major product was found at N-7-guanine, followed by those at N-1-adenine, N-3-adenine and N-3-cytosine (including N-3-uracil). A minor amount of an N6-adenine adduct was also detected, but only after 48 h of reaction. In single-stranded DNA the yield of the N-1-adenine adduct was increased to about the level of the N-7-guanine adduct. The level of the N-3-cytosine adduct was also considerably higher in single-stranded DNA and was the third largest adduct. The reactivity of N-3-adenine was decreased in single-stranded DNA and since other adducts increased the relative yield of this adduct was very low. The N-7-guanine and N-3-adenine adducts were lost from DNA as a consequence of depurination with half-lives in double-stranded DNA at 37 degrees C and pH 7.4 of 38 and 20 h, respectively. The rates of losses (due to depurination or rearrangement) of initially formed adducts in DNA increased in the order N-1-adenine < N-7-guanine approximately N-3-cytosine < N-3-adenine and were faster in single- than in double-stranded DNA. Taking only the rate of formation and chemical stability into consideration, the adducts with N-1-adenine and N-7-guanine seem to be the most promising candidates for monitoring allyl glycidyl ether exposures in vivo.
    Carcinogenesis 08/1996; 17(7):1465-71. · 5.64 Impact Factor
  • Kamila Plna, Dan Segerbäck, Elke K. H. Schweda
    Carcinogenesis 01/1996; 17(7):1465-1471. · 5.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Acrylamide is an alkylating agent which reacts very slowly in direct reactions with DNA and is negative in the Ames test, but is carcinogenic in mice and rats. In order to explain the cancer-initiating properties of acrylamide we have studied DNA adduct formation in vitro with a metabolizing system and in vivo in mice and rats following i.p. administration of 14C-labeled acrylamide. A major adduct found in both species was N-7-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxy-ethyl)guanine, formed by reaction of the DNA with the epoxide metabolite glycidamide. The levels of this adduct were similar in the different organs of the two rodent species, which supports the notion that glycidamide is relatively evenly distributed among tissues and that the organ-specificity in acrylamide carcinogenesis cannot be explained by a selective accumulation of the DNA-reactive metabolite in target organs.
    Carcinogenesis 06/1995; 16(5):1161-5. · 5.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The potential for causing carcinogenic and mutagenic effects has been the main concern when assessing the risks associated with low-level exposures of humans to the industrially important epoxide, propylene oxide (PrO). For regulatory purposes, surface-based extrapolation has been used to determine the human equivalent dose from cancer data obtained in rodents. In this context the tissue dose will more adequately reflect inter- and intraspecies differences with respect to pharmacokinetic parameters than is the case for conventional representations of exposure. The formation of adducts in nucleophilic molecular targets by directly acting electrophilic agents, like epoxides, is thought to be closely linked to the process of cancer initiation. To investigate whether tissue dose is correlated to surface area of the exposed organism, the in vivo adduct levels in hemoglobin and DNA have been determined in mice, rats, and dogs after exposure to PrO by injection as well as by inhalation. The results obtained indicate that the dose in blood is virtually the same in the three investigated animal species, whereas surface-area based extrapolation predicts a difference by a factor of about seven between the mouse and the dog. Although the data base is more limited, this conclusion is also supported by measurements of DNA alkylation is selected tissues. The variations actually observed are not related to the surface area of the animal. No significant differences could be found between administration of PrO by injection or by inhalation. For this reason, the surface-based extrapolation model for estimation of the human equivalent dose is not appropriate, and the carcinogenic potency factors for PrO as previously derived by the U.S. EPA should probably be revised downward by a factor of 10 to 13.
    Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology 09/1994; 20(1 Pt 1):1-14. · 2.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The levels of aromatic DNA adducts were compared by the 32P-postlabeling assay between the lymphocytes isolated from bus maintenance and truck terminal workers, using hospital mechanics as a control group. The adduct levels were elevated in all the bus and truck terminal workers. Within the bus maintenance personnel, garage workers had the highest levels of adducts. Within the terminal workers those driving diesel forklifts had the highest adduct levels. The results suggest that diesel exhaust contributes to the level of adducts.
    Carcinogenesis 05/1994; 15(4):767-9. · 5.64 Impact Factor
  • D Segerbäck
    IARC scientific publications 02/1994;