Vincenza Anzelmo

Sapienza University of Rome, Roma, Latium, Italy

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Publications (9)12.69 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study is to evaluate if occupational exposure to urban stressors could cause alterations in luteinizing hormone (LH) plasma levels in male traffic policemen vs. administrative staff of Municipal Police.After excluding the subjects with the main confounding factors, male traffic police and administrative staff of Municipal Police were matched by age, working life, body mass index (BMI), alcohol drinking habit, cigarette smoking habit and habitual consumption of Italian coffee.In 166 male traffic police mean LH values were significantly higher compared to 166 male administrative employees. The distribution of LH values in traffic police and in administrative employees was statistically significant.Our results suggest that recent exposure to urban stressors (chemical, physical and psycho-social) can alter the plasma concentration of LH. In agreement with our previous research, levels of plasma LH may be used as early biological markers, valuable for the group, used in occupational set before the appearance of the disease.
    Science of The Total Environment 09/2009; 407(16):4591-5. · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study is to evaluate if the occupational exposure to urban stressor could cause alterations in dopamine (DA) plasma levels and related diseases in traffic police officers compared to a control group. After excluding subjects with principal confounding factors, 306 traffic police officers (139 female and 167 male) and 301 controls (134 female and 167 male) were included in the study. In traffic police officers, mean DA values were significantly higher compared with controls (P = 0.006 and P = 0.000 in male and female, respectively). The distribution of DA values in traffic police officers and controls was significant (P = 0.000 and P = 0.000 in male and female, respectively). The number of male traffic police officers with a positive response to the questionnaire's items concerning anxiety, depression and panic attacks was higher than controls, though not significant (7.2% traffic police officers versus 4.2% controls). This difference was also not significant in female traffic police officers compared with controls. According to our previous researches on other neuro-immune-endocrine parameters, DA could be used as an early biological marker, valuable for the group to be employed in occupational sets, even before the onset of pathology.
    Toxicology and Industrial Health 09/2007; 23(7):421-7. · 1.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study is to evaluate if the occupational exposure to urban pollutants could cause alterations on 17-alfa-hydroxy-progesterone plasma levels and related diseases in male traffic policemen. 17-alpha-OH-P is synthesized in Leydig cells and in adrenals; it influences spermiogenesis, acrosoma reaction, testosterone biosynthesis, blocking of gonadotropin secretion; it regulates learning, memory and sleep. After excluding principal confounding factors, i.e., rotating or night shifts, exposure to solvents, paints and pesticides during time-off and smoking, traffic policemen were matched with controls by age, working life and drinking habit. Finally, 112 traffic policemen and 112 controls were included in the study. In traffic policemen 17-alpha-OH-P mean values were significantly higher vs. controls. The distribution of 17-alpha-OH-P values in both groups was significant. An increased frequency of fertility disorders referred to the questionnaire items were found in traffic policemen vs. controls, but the difference was not significant. The occupational exposure to low doses of chemical urban stressor, interacting with and adding to the psychosocial ones, could alter plasma 17-alpha-OH-P concentrations in traffic policemen vs. controls. 17-alpha-OH-P could be used as an early biological marker, even before the onset of the reproductive and mental health diseases.
    Industrial Health 02/2007; 45(1):170-6. · 0.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study is to evaluate whether the occupational exposure to urban pollutants including endocrine disruptors (EDs) could cause alterations in plasma 17-beta-estradiol (E2) levels and related diseases (adverse pregnancy outcome and mental health disorders) in female traffic police compared to a control group. After excluding the subjects with the principal confounding factors, traffic police and controls were matched by age, years of police work, age of menarche, menstrual cycle day, body mass index (BMI), drinking habit, cigarette smoking habit, habitual intake of soy or liquorice in diet and habitual consumption of Italian coffee. Thirty-seven traffic police and 31 controls (seventh day; follicular phase of the ovarian cycle); 38 traffic police and 42 controls (14th day; ovulatory phase of the ovarian cycle); and 25 traffic police and 28 controls (21st day; lutheal phase of the ovarian cycle) were included in the study and then matched for the above-mentioned variables. In follicular and in lutheal phases, mean E2 levels were significantly lower in traffic police compared to controls. The distribution of E2 values in traffic police and controls was significant in follicular, ovulatory and lutheal phases. In ovulatory phase, mean E2 levels were lower but not significant in traffic police compared to controls. An increase was found concerning mental health disorders referred to in the questionnaire items in traffic police compared to controls, although the difference was not significant. Considering that the potential confounding effect of extraneous factors was controlled for by restricting the study population and by matching traffic police and controls on the above-mentioned variables, our results suggest that occupational exposure to urban pollutants, EDs included, might alter E2 plasma concentrations. E2 could be used in occupational set as an early biomarker of exposure to urban pollutants, valuable for the group, even before the onset of the related pathologies (adverse pregnancy outcome and mental health disorders).
    International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health 11/2006; 80(1):70-7. · 2.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The role of occupational exposure to noise as a hypertension risk factor has not been established sufficiently. The aim of the study is to evaluate whether chronic exposure to different levels of noise in two groups of pilots, operating with two types of aircraft, could be a risk for hypertension, what relevance the parameters (intensity, duration and type) of exposure can have and, lastly, whether there are any links between hearing impairment and hypertension. After excluding pilots with confounding factors, a study was made of 77 male pilots of turboprop planes (group A) and 224 male pilots of jet aircraft (group B), matched by age and working life. Blood pressure (supine and standing positions) and heart rate were measured. Electrocardiogram, stress tests on a cycle ergometer, sound-level measurement and audiometric tests were also done. Pilots of group A were exposed to Leq of 93 dBA while pilots of group B were exposed to the Leq of 79 dBA. Significant results in group A compared to group B were found between heart rate, blood pressure, drop in blood pressure, parameters (intensity, duration and type) of exposure to noise and between hearing damage and hypertension. The findings suggest that chronic exposure to noise is a risk factor for blood hypertension in pilots exposed to high noise levels, and that the drop in blood pressure may be a sign of more sensitive effect of noise on blood pressure, according to other studies in literature.
    International Journal of Environmental Health Research 05/2005; 15(2):99-106. · 1.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The study's objective has been to evaluate whether urban pollution, here nickel compounds and metallic nickel (Ni) are present, could determine serum concentrations of the above mentioned metal. Out of a population of 394 Municipal Police employees, subjects with main confounding factors were eliminated. The remaining subjects were made comparable for sex, age, and length of employment. Thus, 160 subjects were included in the study: 80 traffic policemen (42 men and 38 women) with outdoor activity exposed to urban pollutants in a direct way, and 80 administrative workers (42 men and 38 women) with indoor unexposed activity. The results obtained in the studied population demonstrate that in traffic policemen the serum levels of Ni are more elevated than those in administrative workers; both in male and female workers. The authors hypothesise that the presence of Ni as fuel additive in lead free fuels and as catalyser in catalytic exhausts, which have been obligatory in Italy in new cars for the last 10 years, could be one of the causes for the increased serum levels of the above mentioned metal in traffic policemen.
    International Journal of Environmental Health Research 03/2004; 14(1):65-74. · 1.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of present study was to evaluate whether traffic policemen exposed to urban pollutants and possible psycho-social stressors are at risk of alterations on plasma growth hormone (GH) levels compared with a control group. Out of a population of 395 Municipal Police employees, the subjects with principal confounding factors were excluded from the study. The remaining traffic policemen were matched with those not exposed by sex, age, working life, and habitual consumption of alcohol; 71 traffic policemen (40 men and 31 women) with outdoor activity exposed to urban pollutants and 71 not exposed subjects (40 men and 31 women) with indoor activity were included in the study. The plasma levels of GH were significantly lower in the exposed traffic policemen compared with those not exposed (P = 0.000); similarly in male (P = 0.011) and female subjects (P = 0.000). The authors hypothesize the possibility of an effect of the specific working activity in traffic policemen on the plasma GH concentrations.
    Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A 07/2003; 38(6):1017-24. · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether traffic policemen exposed to urban pollutants could be at risk of alterations on urinary homovanillic acid in 24h HVA(U) excretion levels, an end product of dopamine catabolism, compared with a control group. Traffic policemen were matched by sex, age, and working life with control group after excluding principal confounding factors; 50 traffic policemen (29 men and 21 women) with outdoor activity exposed to urban pollutants and 50 not exposed subjects (29 men and 21 women) with indoor activity were included in the study. The HVA(U) excretion levels were significantly higher in male and female traffic policemen compared to not exposed subjects (respectively P=0.003; P=0.023). The authors hypothesize an effect on the excretion of HVA(U) in traffic policemen exposed to chemical and physical stressors, according to HVA(U) modifications found by other authors in workers exposed in factories.
    Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A 02/2003; 38(12):2909-18. · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study is to evaluate if the occupational exposure to urban pollutants could cause alterations on 17-alfa-hydroxy-progesterone plasma levels and related diseases in male traffic policemen. 17-α α α α α-OH-P is synthesized in Leydig cells and in adrenals; it influences spermiogenesis, acrosoma reaction, testosterone biosynthesis, blocking of gonadotropin secretion; it regulates learning, memory and sleep. After excluding principal confounding factors, i.e., rotating or night shifts, exposure to solvents, paints and pesticides during time-off and smoking, traffic policemen were matched with controls by age, working life and drinking habit. Finally, 112 traffic policemen and 112 controls were included in the study. In traffic policemen 17-α α α α α-OH-P mean values were significantly higher vs. controls. The distribution of 17-α α α α α-OH-P values in both groups was significant. An increased frequency of fertility disorders referred to the questionnaire items were found in traffic policemen vs. controls, but the difference was not significant. The occupational exposure to low doses of chemical urban stressor, interacting with and adding to the psychosocial ones, could alter plasma 17-α α α α α-OH-P concentrations in traffic policemen vs. controls. 17-α α α α α-OH-P could be used as an early biological marker, even before the onset of the reproductive and mental health diseases.