M Kerboull

Université René Descartes - Paris 5, Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France

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Publications (57)74.3 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Zirconia was introduced in the 1980s for total hip arthroplasty (THA) with the expectation of lower polyethylene wear. The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the results of a continuous series of total hip arthroplasties combining a zirconia head with polyethylene socket at a minimum eight-year follow-up. METHODS: We performed an open prospective clinical trial in 1997. Our study involved 51 consecutive patients (55 hips) with a mean age of 52.5 ± 12 years (range, 25-76 years). All patients had a Charnley-Kerboull all-cemented hip replacement. A 22-mm stabilised yttrium tetragonal polycrystalline zirconia head (Y-TZP) was used in association with moderately cross-linked and annealed polyethylene. Clinical and radiological outcomes were assessed yearly. A survival analysis was performed using revision for any reason as the end-point. RESULTS: At a minimum eight-year follow-up, 12 patients (13 hips) were lost to follow-up (mean 26.8 months), two patients (two hips) had died, and six patients (six hips) were revised. The remaining 31 patients (34 hips) were alive and had not been revised on either the femoral or acetabular side at a mean follow-up of 117.1 months (range, 96-150 months). Mean functional score at last follow-up was 17.7. Mean linear head penetration was 0.23 mm/year. More than 90 % of the remaining hips had signs of periprosthetic osteolysis. Five stems were loosened. The survival at eight years was 87.3 % (95 % IC: 76.7-97.8). CONCLUSION: This study confirms earlier short-terms results, and demonstrates that zirconia should no longer be used in THA.
    International Orthopaedics 01/2013; · 2.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have evaluated the in vivo migration patterns of 164 primary consecutive Charnley-Kerboull total hip replacements which were undertaken in 155 patients. The femoral preparation included removal of diaphyseal cancellous bone to obtain primary rotational stability of the stem before line-to-line cementing. We used the Ein Bild Roentgen Analyse femoral component method to assess the subsidence of the femoral component. At a mean of 17.3 years (15.1 to 18.3) 73 patients were still alive and had not been revised, eight had been revised, 66 had died and eight had been lost to follow-up. The mean subsidence of the entire series was 0.63 mm (0.0 to 1.94). When using a 1.5 mm threshold, only four stems were considered to have subsided. Our study showed that, in most cases, a highly polished double-tapered stem cemented line-to-line does not subside at least up to 18 years after implantation.
    Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery - British Volume 03/2010; 92(3):342-8. · 2.69 Impact Factor
  • L Kerboull, M Hamadouche, M Kerboull
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    ABSTRACT: We describe 129 consecutive revision total hip replacements using a Charnley-Kerboull femoral component of standard length with impaction allografting. The mean follow-up was 8.2 years (2 to 16). Additionally, extramedullary reinforcement was performed using struts of cortical allograft in 49 hips and cerclage wires in 30. There was one intra-operative fracture of the femur but none later. Two femoral components subsided by 5 mm and 8 mm respectively, and were considered to be radiological failures. No further revision of a femoral component was required. The rate of survival of the femoral component at nine years, using radiological failure as the endpoint, was 98%. Our study showed that impaction grafting in association with a Charnley-Kerboull femoral component has a low rate of subsidence. Reconstruction of deficiencies of distal bone with struts of cortical allograft appeared to be an efficient way of preventing postoperative femoral fracture for up to 16 years.
    Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery - British Volume 04/2009; 91(3):304-9. · 2.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The optimal surface finish for a cemented THA stem is still debated. We hypothesized surface finish would influence survival of Kerboull cemented hip arthroplasties and a matte finish would have lower survival. We reviewed survival of 433 total hip arthroplasties in 395 patients: 284 consecutive patients (310 hips) were enrolled in a prospective, randomized study of polished (165 hips) or matte finish stems (145 hips) and compared to a historical series of satin stems (123 hips) in 111 patients. The satin and matte finish implants had similar geometry but the polished was quadrangular rather than oval. Finish roughnesses were: polished (radius, 0.04 microm), satin (radius, 0.9 microm), and matte (radius, 1.7 microm). The mean age of the patients at the time of the index arthroplasty was 63.6 years. The survival rate at 13 years, using radiographic loosening as the end point, was 97.3%+/-2.6% for polished stems, 97.1%+/-2.1% for satin stems, and 78.9%+/-5.8% for matte stems. The data suggest survival of Kerboull stems was higher with a polished or satin surface finish than with a matte finish. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level II, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
    Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research 03/2008; 466(2):332-9. · 2.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Extensive bone loss raises formidable challenges in total hip revision. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of reconstruction using a cemented long-stem and massive structural allograft implanted in a filleted proximal femur, with and without the use of a trochanteric claw plate. Between 1988 and 2001, 44 revisions were performed in 42 patients. After a transtrochanteric approach, the femur was cut longitudinally. A long, cemented Charnley-type prosthesis was used, and flaps of the residual femur were folded around the allograft. The greater trochanter was reinserted with wires in all revisions, and with both wires and a claw plate in 20 revisions. Mean follow-up was 7.15 years (range: 3-16); seven patients, died and four were lost to follow-up. The follow-up exceeded five years in 34 patients. The major complication was nonunion of the greater trochanter, which occurred in 25 cases. Six dislocations, one recurrence of infection, two mechanical loosening, and two fractures below the stem were also recorded. The use of a trochanteric claw plate significantly improved final hip stability, even in patients with nonunion. Femoral reconstruction with a massive structural allograft is reliable and long-lived, and serious complications and long-term resorption are uncommon. The use of a trochanteric claw plate significantly improves final hip stability. Level of evidence: Therapeutic study, level III (retrospective comparative study).
    International Orthopaedics 01/2008; 31(6):851-7. · 2.32 Impact Factor
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    L. Kerboull, M. Hamadouche, M. Kerboull
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    ABSTRACT: Once routinely used, trochanteric osteotomy in total hip arthroplasty now is usually limited to difficult primary and revision cases. Many variations of the osteotomy and many various techniques for the trochanter reattachment have been described. Our specific surgical technique is presented as well as its advantages and drawbacks. Primary total hip arthroplasty procedures requiring the enhanced exposure provided by trochanteric osteotomy is needed in patients with hip ankylosis or fusion, protrusio acetabuli, proximal femoral deformities, developmental dysplasia, or abductor muscle laxity. Trochanteric osteotomy, in revision arthroplasties, facilitates the removal of well-fixed femoral components and enhance acetabular exposure. In all cases trochanteric osteotomy remains useful to preserve the periarticular muscles and restore the geometry of the artificial hip which are the best ways to prevent dislocation.
    Interactive Surgery 01/2007; 2(3):149-154.
  • Revue De Chirurgie Orthopedique Et Reparatrice De L Appareil Moteur - REV CHIR ORTHOP REPARAT APP. 01/2007; 93(7):121-121.
  • Luc Kerboull, Moussa Hamadouche, Marcel Kerboull
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    ABSTRACT: A consecutive series of 118 total hip arthroplasties was performed for Crowe type IV developmental hip dysplasia in 89 patients. The mean age of the patients was 52 years. All procedures were carried out through a transtrochanteric approach by the same surgeon. In all cases, the acetabular component was placed at the level of the true acetabulum. The mean lengthening of the operated limb was 3.8 cm. The average follow-up of the whole series was 16.9 years. At the last follow-up evaluation, 41 patients (48 hips) had died and 7 patients (9 hips) were lost to followup. Forty patients (61 hips) were still alive at a mean follow-up of 22 years. At the time of last follow-up, the mean Merle d’Aubigné hip score was 17 compared with 10.6 preoperatively. The survival rate, with revision for any reason as the endpoint, was 75% at 25-year follow-up.
    12/2006: pages 211-219;
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this retrospective study was to report the minimum 10-year follow-up results of a consecutive series of 122 cemented low-friction total hip arthroplasties performed for osteonecrosis. Revision was performed for high polyethylene wear associated with periprosthetic osteolysis and socket loosening in 6 hips, and for deep sepsis in 1. The survival rate at 15 years, using revision for any reason as the end point, was 88.5%. Among the variables studied in this series, the only factor associated with a higher risk of revision was a socket wear rate greater than 0.1 mm/y. This series indicated that cemented low-friction total hip arthroplasty performed for avascular necrosis could grant satisfactory long-term results, provided that polyethylene socket wear remained below 0.1 mm/y.
    The Journal of Arthroplasty 07/2006; 21(4):533-40. · 2.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: New bearings have been developed to reduce polyethylene wear. Zirconia ceramic is one proposal with attractive tribologic properties. The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological results at least two years after implantation in a continuous series of total hip arthroplasties combining a zirconia head with polyethylene socket. The series included 56total hip arthroplasties performed in 51 patients (30 females and 21 males), mean age 52.2 +/- 12 years (25-76 years). Prostheses were implanted for primary degenerative disease (43%) and dysplasia (27%). The femoral component was a stainless steel stem with a Morse cone measuring 11degrees 25' for 27 hips and 5 degrees 40' for 28 hips. A 22-mm stabilized yttrium tetragonal polycrystalline zirconia head (Y-TZP) was used. The transtrochanteric approach was used for all arthroplaties with implantation of a cemented Charnley-Kerboull prosthesis. Clinical outcome was assessed with the Postel-Merle-d'Aubligné (PMA) score. Acetabular cup wear and periprosthetic osteolysis were measured on successive AP x-rays of the pelvis. Mean follow-up was 32 months (24-48). None of the patients were lost to follow-up. Mean function score at last follow-up was 17.8 +/- 0.2 (16-18) versus 12.2 +/- 2.6 preoperatively (Wilcoxon, p < 0.0001). There were no cases of implant migration (femoral or acetabular). An endosteal defect by femoral osteolysis in the calcar femoral was observed in 19 of 55 cases. It appeared early between first and second post-operative year and did not progress later. Its surface remained less than 1 cm2 in all cases. We were unable to identify any factor predictive of these osteolytic lesions. The short-term clinical results with this type of arthroplasty was comparable with earlier results described with classical Charnely-Kerboull implants using a metal-polyethylene bearing. The Merkel osteolysis observed in this series occurred early for one-third of the hips with no measurable polyethylene wear. We suggest surgeons should be cautious about using the zirconia head. We are continuing our surveillance of these patients.
    Revue de Chirurgie Orthopédique et Réparatrice de l Appareil Moteur 09/2005; 91(5):439-45. · 0.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the hip is a rare disease. Synovectomy is generally accepted as the only surgical treatment for the disorder, but there have been few studies with a sufficient sample size and duration of follow-up to allow the evaluation of long-term outcomes. The aim of this study was to determine the long-term outcome of the treatment in sixteen patients. Sixteen patients (nine men and seven women), with a mean age of 35.5 years at the time of surgery, were treated between 1970 and 1996. Complete synovectomy was performed in all patients; in addition, three had a cup arthroplasty, four had a total hip arthroplasty, and one had a monopolar arthroplasty. Clinical and radiographic outcomes were evaluated retrospectively at a mean of 16.7 years postoperatively. Only one patient was followed for less than eight years. Nine patients needed repeat surgery, but only one had recurrent synovitis, as detected with pathological examination fourteen years after treatment with synovectomy and cup arthroplasty. Secondary osteoarthritis developed in all eight patients who had been treated with synovectomy alone, and four of them required a total hip arthroplasty within the follow-up period. These results support earlier data indicating that osteoarthritis consistently develops in patients with pigmented villonodular synovitis of the hip. Complete synovectomy seems to be effective in preventing recurrence of the synovitis, but it does not appear to prevent the development of secondary osteoarthritis.
    The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery 06/2005; 87(5):1019-24. · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose of the studyNew bearings have been developed to reduce polyethylene wear. Zirconia ceramic is one proposal with attractive tribologic properties. The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological results at least two years after implantation in a continuous series of total hip arthroplasties combining a zirconia head with polyethylene socket.Material and methodsThe series included 56 total hip arthroplasties performed in 51 patients (30 females and 21 males), mean age 52.2 ± 12 years (25-76 years). Prostheses were implanted for primary degenerative disease (43%) and dysplasia (27%). The femoral component was a stainless steel stem with a Morse cone measuring 11̊25’ for 27 hips and 5̊40’ for 28 hips. A 22-mm stabilized yttrium tetragonal polycrystalline zirconia head (Y-TZP) was used. The transtrochanteric approach was used for all arthroplaties with implantation of a cemented Charnley-Kerboull prosthesis. Clinical outcome was assessed with the Postel-Merle-d’Aubligné (PMA) score. Acetabular cup wear and periprosthetic osteolysis were measured on successive AP x-rays of the pelvis.ResultsMean follow-up was 32 months (24-48). None of the patients were lost to follow-up. Mean function score at last follow-up was 17.8 ± 0.2 (16-18) versus 12.2 ± 2.6 preoperatively (Wilcoxon, p < 0.0001). There were no cases of implant migration (femoral or acetabular). An endosteal defect by femoral osteolysis in the calcar femoral was observed in 19 of 55 cases. It appeared early between first and second post-operative year and did not progress later. Its surface remained less than 1 cm2 in all cases. We were unable to identify any factor predictive of these osteolytic lesions.DiscussionThe short-term clinical results with this type of arthroplasty was comparable with earlier results described with classical Charnely-Kerboull implants using a metal-polyethylene bearing. The Merkel osteolysis observed in this series occurred early for one-third of the hips with no measurable polyethylene wear. We suggest surgeons should be cautious about using the zirconia head. We are continuing our surveillance of these patients.
    Revue de Chirurgie Orthopédique et Réparatrice de l'Appareil Moteur. 01/2005; 91(5):439-445.
  • Revue De Chirurgie Orthopedique Et Reparatrice De L Appareil Moteur - REV CHIR ORTHOP REPARAT APP. 01/2005; 91(4):355-357.
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze the utility of a trochanteric claw plate in the treatment of an ununited greater trochanter following total hip arthroplasty. From 1986 through 1999, seventy-two consecutive procedures to reattach an ununited greater trochanter were performed in seventy-one patients. The average age at the time of the index arthroplasty was 66.2 years. The arthroplasty that resulted in the nonunion of the greater trochanter was primary in fifty-four hips, a first revision in sixteen hips, and a second and third revision in one hip each. The mean duration between the hip replacement and the treatment of the nonunion was 8.1 months. The greater trochanter was fixed with the trochanteric plate alone in forty-eight hips and with the plate in conjunction with vertical wires in the remaining twenty-four hips. The average duration of followup was 5.1 years. Osseous union occurred in fifty-one of the seventy-two hips. There was a persistent nonunion in twelve hips and fibrous consolidation in the remaining nine hips. The mean time to osseous consolidation was 3.7 +/- 2.1 months (range, two to twelve months). The mean Merle d'Aubigne hip score was 16.1 +/- 2.4 points at the time of the latest follow-up. A highly significant improvement in function was achieved only in the group with osseous consolidation (p < 0.0001). The highest rate of osseous union was achieved when vertical wires had been used in conjunction with the claw plate. Union occurred in twenty-one of the twenty-four hips in that group (p = 0.025). Nonunion of the greater trochanter following total hip arthroplasty can be successfully treated with a trochanteric claw plate. The use of adjunctive vertical wires results in better osseous contact and union.
    The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery 09/2004; 86-A Suppl 1(Pt 2):112-8. · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Two hundred eighty-seven Charnley-Kerboull low friction total hip arthroplasties were done between 1975 and 1990 in 222 patients younger than 50 years. The average age of the patients at the time of the index procedure was 40.1 years. The mean followup of the entire series was 14.5 +/- 5.1 years with a median of 13.9 years. Forty-five patients (52 hips) had a followup greater than 20 years. The mean preoperative Merle d'Aubigné hip functional score was 9.6 +/- 2.5 points versus 17.2 +/- 0.8 points at the latest followup. Twenty-five revisions were documented in this series; 17 were done for aseptic loosening. The mean wear rate was 0.12 +/- 0.21 mm per year. Considering 0.1 mm per year as the threshold for a normal wear rate, 196 hips had a normal or below normal wear rate (mean, 0.02 mm per year), whereas the remaining 91 hips had an abnormally high wear rate (mean, 0.28 mm per year). The overall survival rate at 20 years was 85.4% +/- 5% using revision of either component as the end point. The only predictive factor of loosening was a wear rate higher than 0.1 mm per year.
    Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research 02/2004; · 2.79 Impact Factor
  • Revue De Chirurgie Orthopedique Et Reparatrice De L Appareil Moteur - REV CHIR ORTHOP REPARAT APP. 01/2004; 90(6):144-144.
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    ABSTRACT: Acetabular osteolysis associated with socket loosening is one of the main long-term complications of total hip arthroplasty. In the case of major bone loss where less than 50% host bone coverage can be obtained with a porous-coated cementless cup, it is generally agreed that a metal ring in association with a cemented component and allograft bone should be used. Herein we describe the technical details of the use of the Kerboull acetabular reinforcement device and the GAP cup. Both these devices have a hook that has to be placed under the teardrop of the acetabulum and a plate for iliac fixation. The main advantages of these devices are their help in restoring the normal hip center of rotation, guiding the reconstruction, and partially unloading the graft. The Kerboull acetabular reinforcement device has provided a 92% survival rate free of loosening at 13-year follow-up in a consecutive series of 60 type III and IV deficiencies.
    Operative Techniques in Orthopaedics 01/2004; 14(2):121-129.
  • Revue De Chirurgie Orthopedique Et Reparatrice De L Appareil Moteur - REV CHIR ORTHOP REPARAT APP. 01/2004; 90(5):210-210.
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    ABSTRACT: Polyethylene wear and polyethylene particles induced periprosthetic osteolysis remains currently the major limitation to the long-term performance of total hip arthroplasty. To reduce polyethylene wear, P. Boutin introduced alumina ceramic femoral heads in the early 1970’s. However, the relative brittle nature of alumina was responsible for a high rate of fracture. Improvement in the manufacturing process with a low grain size and grain distribution dramatically decreased the risk of crack propagation and rate of fracture. Despite these improvements, the use of 22.2-mm diameter alumina ceramic femoral head is not recommended in Europe.
    12/2003: pages 75-82;
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze the utility of a trochanteric claw plate in the treatment of an ununited greater trochanter following total hip arthroplasty. From 1986 through 1999, seventy-two consecutive procedures to reattach an ununited greater trochanter were performed in seventy-one patients. The average age at the time of the index arthroplasty was 66.2 years. The arthroplasty that resulted in the nonunion of the greater trochanter was primary in fifty-four hips, a first revision in sixteen hips, and a second and third revision in one hip each. The mean duration between the hip replacement and the treatment of the nonunion was 8.1 months. The greater trochanter was fixed with the trochanteric plate alone in forty-eight hips and with the plate in conjunction with vertical wires in the remaining twenty-four hips. The average duration of follow-up was 5.1 years. Osseous union occurred in fifty-one of the seventy-two hips. There was a persistent nonunion in twelve hips and fibrous consolidation in the remaining nine hips. The mean time to osseous consolidation was 3.7 +/- 2.1 months (range, two to twelve months). The mean Merle d'Aubigné hip score was 16.1 +/- 2.4 points at the time of the latest follow-up. A highly significant improvement in function was achieved only in the group with osseous consolidation (p < 0.0001). The highest rate of osseous union was achieved when vertical wires had been used in conjunction with the claw plate. Union occurred in twenty-one of the twenty-four hips in that group (p = 0.025). Nonunion of the greater trochanter following total hip arthroplasty can be successfully treated with a trochanteric claw plate. The use of adjunctive vertical wires results in better osseous contact and union.
    The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery 08/2003; 85-A(7):1330-7. · 3.23 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

394 Citations
74.30 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008
    • Université René Descartes - Paris 5
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2002
    • Paris Diderot University
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2000
    • Institut Universitaire de France
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 1977
    • Hôpital Cochin (Hôpitaux Universitaires Paris Centre)
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France