Miey Park

National Institutes of Health, Maryland, United States

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Publications (6)52.46 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Although approximately 25 common genetic susceptibility loci have been identified to be independently associated with breast cancer risk through genome-wide association studies (GWAS), the genetic risk variants reported to date only explain a small fraction of the heritability of breast cancer. Furthermore, GWAS-identified loci were primarily identified in women of European descent. To evaluate previously identified loci in Korean women and to identify additional novel breast cancer susceptibility variants, we conducted a three-stage GWAS that included 6,322 cases and 5,897 controls. In the validation study using Stage I of the 2,273 cases and 2,052 controls, seven GWAS-identified loci [5q11.2/MAP3K1 (rs889312 and rs16886165), 5p15.2/ROPN1L (rs1092913), 5q12/MRPS30 (rs7716600), 6q25.1/ESR1 (rs2046210 and rs3734802), 8q24.21 (rs1562430), 10q26.13/FGFR2 (rs10736303), and 16q12.1/TOX3 (rs4784227 and rs3803662)] were significantly associated with breast cancer risk in Korean women (Ptrend < 0.05). To identify additional genetic risk variants, we selected the most promising 17 SNPs in Stage I and replicated these SNPs in 2,052 cases and 2,169 controls (Stage II). Four SNPs were further evaluated in 1,997 cases and 1,676 controls (Stage III). SNP rs13393577 at chromosome 2q34, located in the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 4 (ERBB4) gene, showed a consistent association with breast cancer risk with combined odds ratios (95% CI) of 1.53 (1.37-1.70) (combined P for trend = 8.8 × 10-14). This study shows that seven breast cancer susceptibility loci, which were previously identified in European and/or Chinese populations, could be directly replicated in Korean women. Furthermore, this study provides strong evidence implicating rs13393577 at 2q34 as a new risk variant for breast cancer.
    Breast cancer research: BCR 03/2012; 14(2):R56. · 5.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common degenerative joint disorder in the elderly population. To identify OA-associated genetic variants and candidate genes, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS). A total 3,793 samples (476 cases: wrist + knee and 3317 controls) from a community-based epidemiological study were genotyped using the Affymetrix SNP 5.0. An intronic SNP (rs4789934) in the TIMP2 (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2) showed the most significance with OA (odd ratio [OR] = 2.06, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.52-2.81, p = 4.01 × 10 -6). Furthermore, a poly-morphism (rs1352677) in the NKAIN2 (Na + /K + trans-porting ATPase interacting 2) was suggestively asso-ciated with OA (OR = 1.43, CI = 1.22-1.66, p = 7.01 × 10 -6). The present study provides new insights into the identification of genetic predisposing factors for OA.
    Genomics & Informatics. 09/2011; 3(9):121-126.
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    ABSTRACT: Unlike Caucasian populations, genetic factors contributing to the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are not well studied in Asian populations. In light of this, and the fact that copy number variation (CNV) is emerging as a new way to understand human genomic variation, the objective of this study was to identify type 2 diabetes-associated CNV in a Korean cohort. Using the Illumina HumanHap300 BeadChip (317,503 markers), genome-wide genotyping was performed to obtain signal and allelic intensities from 275 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and 496 nondiabetic subjects (Total n = 771). To increase the sensitivity of CNV identification, we incorporated multiple factors using PennCNV, a program that is based on the hidden Markov model (HMM). To assess the genetic effect of CNV on T2DM, a multivariate logistic regression model controlling for age and gender was used. We identified a total of 7,478 CNVs (average of 9.7 CNVs per individual) and 2,554 CNV regions (CNVRs; 164 common CNVRs for frequency>1%) in this study. Although we failed to demonstrate robust associations between CNVs and the risk of T2DM, our results revealed a putative association between several CNVRs including chr15:45994758-45999227 (P = 8.6E-04, P(corr) = 0.01) and the risk of T2DM. The identified CNVs in this study were validated using overlapping analysis with the Database of Genomic Variants (DGV; 71.7% overlap), and quantitative PCR (qPCR). The identified variations, which encompassed functional genes, were significantly enriched in the cellular part, in the membrane-bound organelle, in the development process, in cell communication, in signal transduction, and in biological regulation. We expect that the methods and findings in this study will contribute in particular to genome studies of Asian populations.
    PLoS ONE 01/2011; 6(4):e19091. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the association of identified copy number variations (CNVs) in whole genome with the risk of Avellino corneal dystrophy (ACD) in a Korean population. Case-control study. A total of 146 patients with ACD and 226 control subjects. A total of 193 trios were genotyped by the Illumina HumanHapCNV370-Duo BeadChip (370,404 markers) (Illumina, Inc., San Diego, CA). The intensity signal (log R ratio) and allelic intensity ratio (B allele frequency) of each marker in all individuals were obtained by Illumina BeadStudio software (Illumina, Inc.). To obtain authentic CNVs in this study, we performed a family-based CNV validation and family-based boundary mapping using the PennCNV algorithm, which incorporates multiple factors, including total log R ratio, B allele frequency, and family information, based on an integrated hidden Markov model. Statistical comparison and identification of CNVs between case and control using family information. We identified 27,267 individual trio CNVs with a median size of 16.2 kb, aggregated in 2245 CNV regions. Most of the identified trio CNVs in this study showed well-defined CNV boundaries and overlapped with those in the Database of Genomic Variants (DGV) (83.4% in number and 79.2% in length). With the common CNV regions (264 CNV regions >5%), we performed a family-based association test with the risk of ACD. Two CNV regions (chr6:29978470-29987783 and chr14:59896944-59916129) were significantly associated with the risk of ACD (P=0.05-0.003 and P=0.008, respectively). This study describes the first results of a genome-wide association analysis of individual CNVs with the risk of ACD and shows that 2 novel CNV loci may be involved in the risk of ACD. The author(s) have no proprietary or commercial interest in any materials discussed in this article.
    Ophthalmology 03/2010; 117(7):1306-12.e4. · 5.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although the locations of many common deletion variants in the human genome are unknown, such deletions may be causative in rare disorders. Deletions can be mapped through the identification of Mendelian inconsistencies in pedigrees. Data for a total of 341,577 SNPs from an ACD family cohort (n=551) and 341,039 SNPs from a Korean-Vietnamese family cohort (n=554) were collected for a genome-wide association study using Illumina 370K-Duo Beadchips((R)). In the present study, a Mendelian inconsistency analysis of genotype data identified 1029 deletion variants in Korean and Korean-Vietnam family cohorts of 404 trios comprising 1105 individuals. Small-deletion copy number variations adjacent to 10 deletion variants were then validated by the real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The expected copy numbers of each deletion variant were directly matched to its genotype cluster image. Deletion variants were also in strong linkage disequilibrium with nearby SNPs. To determine the overall contribution of the 1029 deletion variants, we analyzed case-control trio associations with the risk for Avellino corneal dystrophy. One SNP marker (rs885945) neighboring the gene encoding major histocompatibility complex class I F (HLA-F) was significantly associated with the risk of Avellino corneal dystrophy (P=0.0003). rs885945 showed high LD with SNPs within the HLA-F gene. Therefore, HLA-F may be a potential candidate gene for Avellino corneal dystrophy.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 08/2009; 387(4):688-93. · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To identify genetic factors influencing quantitative traits of biomedical importance, we conducted a genome-wide association study in 8,842 samples from population-based cohorts recruited in Korea. For height and body mass index, most variants detected overlapped those reported in European samples. For the other traits examined, replication of promising GWAS signals in 7,861 independent Korean samples identified six previously unknown loci. For pulse rate, signals reaching genome-wide significance mapped to chromosomes 1q32 (rs12731740, P = 2.9 x 10(-9)) and 6q22 (rs12110693, P = 1.6 x 10(-9)), with the latter approximately 400 kb from the coding sequence of GJA1. For systolic blood pressure, the most compelling association involved chromosome 12q21 and variants near the ATP2B1 gene (rs17249754, P = 1.3 x 10(-7)). For waist-hip ratio, variants on chromosome 12q24 (rs2074356, P = 7.8 x 10(-12)) showed convincing associations, although no regional transcript has strong biological candidacy. Finally, we identified two loci influencing bone mineral density at multiple sites. On chromosome 7q31, rs7776725 (within the FAM3C gene) was associated with bone density at the radius (P = 1.0 x 10(-11)), tibia (P = 1.6 x 10(-6)) and heel (P = 1.9 x 10(-10)). On chromosome 7p14, rs1721400 (mapping close to SFRP4, a frizzled protein gene) showed consistent associations at the same three sites (P = 2.2 x 10(-3), P = 1.4 x 10(-7) and P = 6.0 x 10(-4), respectively). This large-scale GWA analysis of well-characterized Korean population-based samples highlights previously unknown biological pathways.
    Nature Genetics 06/2009; 41(5):527-34. · 35.21 Impact Factor