Jennifer T Anger

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, United States

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Publications (91)180.77 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objectives of this study are to evaluate urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse knowledge among elder southwestern American Indian women and to assess barriers to care for pelvic floor disorders through community-engaged research.
    Female pelvic medicine & reconstructive surgery. 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The objectives of this study are to better understand women's experience with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and to compare this experience between English-speaking and Spanish-speaking women.
    Female pelvic medicine & reconstructive surgery. 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: As the aging population in the United States grows, the investigation of urinary incontinence (UI) issues becomes increasingly important, especially among women. Using data from the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS), we sought to determine the prevalence and correlates of UI among an ethnically diverse population of older community-dwelling women.
    Female pelvic medicine & reconstructive surgery. 09/2014;
  • Alexandriah N Alas, Jennifer T Anger
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    ABSTRACT: The aim was to review most recent literature and provide updates in clinical management and surgical treatment of apical pelvic organ prolapse.
    Current opinion in obstetrics & gynecology. 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives Sacral neuromodulation is Food and Drug Administration approved for many types of voiding dysfunction. Goals of treatment often include cessation of anticholinergic therapy. With the goal of understanding the impact of sacral neuromodulation on anticholinergic use, we analyzed patterns of care using a national claims-based dataset. Materials and Methods The Ingenix (i3) data base contains insurance claims, including utilization and cost data, for 75 large employers. De-identified patients who underwent sacral neuromodulation between 2002 and 2007 were identified by the unique current procedural terminology-4 procedure code for pulse generator implantation, code 64590. The number and costs of anticholinergic prescriptions were compared before and after treatment. ResultsThere were 266 percutaneous and 794 two-staged procedures performed from 2002 to 2007 in the i3 dataset. A total of 484 pulse generator implantations were performed, representing 46% of the test procedures. During the year prior to pulse generator placement, each patient purchased an average of 2.1 prescriptions for an anticholinergic agent (SD 3.5). During the year after neuromodulation, each patient purchased an average of 1.0 prescription (SD 2.3, p < 0.0001 by t-test). Prescription charges were $241.31 per patient before and $103.52 after neuromodulation, a statistically significant cost difference (p < 0.0001 by t-test). During the year before the procedure, 50% of patients filled anticholinergic prescriptions. This decreased to 23% after the procedure (p < 0.0001 by chi-square test). Conclusions Sacral neuromodulation was associated with a significant decrease in the use of anticholinergic medication. Cost-effectiveness analyses that take into account patient quality-adjusted life years are needed to determine the true cost-benefit ratio of sacral neuromodulation.
    Neuromodulation 01/2014; 17(1). · 1.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To compare short-term outcomes between prolapse repairs with and without mesh using a national data set. Mesh use in surgical treatment of pelvic organ prolapse has gained wide popularity. However, mesh complications have increased concomitantly with its use. Methods Public Use File data were obtained for a 5% random national sample of female Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 years and older. Women who underwent prolapse surgery were identified using Current Procedural Terminology Coding System, Fourth Edition (CPT-4) codes. Because the code for mesh placement was effected in 2005, we separated patients into 3 cohorts as follows: those who underwent prolapse repairs from 1999 to 2000 (presumably without mesh), those who underwent repairs from 2007 to 2008 (presumably without mesh), and those with mesh (based on CPT-4 code 57267) from 2007 to 2008. One-year outcomes were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnosis and procedure codes and CPT-4 procedure codes. Results A total of 9180 prolapse repairs without mesh were performed from 1999 to 2000, 7729 without mesh from 2007 to 2008, and 1804 prolapse repairs with mesh from 2007 to 2008. Prolapse reoperation within 1 year of surgery was higher in nonmesh vs mesh cohorts (6%-7% vs 4%, P <.02). Mesh removal rates were higher in mesh vs nonmesh group (4% vs 0%-1%, P <.001). Mesh use was associated with more dyspareunia, mesh-related complications, and urinary retention, even when controlling for concomitant sling. Conclusion Mesh to treat pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence was associated with a small decrease in early reoperation for prolapse. This decrease came at the expense of increased rates of pelvic pain, retention, mesh-related complications, and mesh removal.
    Urology 01/2014; 83(4):768–773. · 2.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Laparoscopic and robotic sacrocolpopexy are widely used for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) treatment. Evidence comparing outcomes and costs is lacking. We compared costs and clinically relevant outcomes in women randomized to laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy compared with robotic sacrocolpopexy. Participants with symptomatic stage POP II or greater, including significant apical support loss, were randomized to either laparoscopic or robotic sacrocolpopexy. We compared surgical costs (including costs for robot, initial hospitalization) and rehospitalization within 6 weeks. Secondary outcomes included postoperative pain, POP quantification, symptom severity and quality of life, and adverse events. We randomized 78 women (mean age 59 years): laparoscopic (n=38) and robotic (n=40). The robotic sacrocolpopexy group had higher initial hospital costs ($19,616 compared with $11,573, P<.001) and over 6 weeks, hospital costs remained higher for robotic sacrocolpopexy ($20,898 compared with $12,170, P<.001). When we excluded costs of robot purchase and maintenance, we did not detect a statistical difference in initial day of surgery costs of robotic compared with laparoscopic ($12,586 compared with $11,573; P=.160) or hospital costs over 6 weeks ($13,867 compared with $12,170; P=.060). The robotic group had longer operating room times (202.8 minutes compared with 178.4 minutes, P=.030) and higher pain scores 1 week after surgery (3.5±2.1 compared with 2.6±2.2; P=.044). There were no group differences in symptom bother by Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory, POP stage, or rate of adverse events. Costs of robotic sacrocolpopexy are higher than laparoscopic, whereas short-term outcomes and complications are similar. Primary cost differences resulted from robot maintenance and purchase costs. Clinicaltrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01124916. : I.
    Obstetrics and Gynecology 01/2014; 123(1):5-12. · 4.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recurrent pelvic organ prolapse (POP) has been attributed to many factors, one of which is lack of vaginal apical support. To assess the role of vaginal apical support and POP, we analyzed a national dataset to compare long-term reoperation rates after prolapse surgery performed with and without apical support. Public use file data on a 5% random national sample of female Medicare beneficiaries were obtained from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Women with POP who underwent surgery during 1999 were identified by relevant International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification, and Current Procedural Terminology, Fourth Edition codes. Individual patients were followed-up through 2009. Prolapse repair was categorized as anterior, posterior, or anterior-posterior with or without a concomitant apical suspension procedure. The primary outcome was the rate of retreatment for POP. In 1999, 21,245 women had a diagnosis of POP. Of these, 3,244 (15.3%) underwent prolapse surgery that year. There were 2,756 women who underwent an anterior colporrhaphy, posterior colporrhaphy, or both with or without apical suspension. After 10 years, cumulative reoperation rates were highest among women who had an isolated anterior repair (20.2%) and significantly exceeded reoperation rates among women who had a concomitant apical support procedure (11.6%; P<.01). Ten years after surgery for POP, the reoperation rate was significantly reduced when a concomitant apical suspension procedure was performed. This analysis of a national cohort suggests that the appropriate use of a vaginal apical support procedure at the time of surgical treatment of POP might reduce the long-term risk of prolapse recurrence. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:: II.
    Obstetrics and Gynecology 10/2013; · 4.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Numerous studies have documented a relationship between provider variables, including surgeon volume and specialty, and outcomes for surgical procedures. In this study we analyzed claims data from a Medicare database to analyze outcomes of sacral neuromodulation (SNM) with respect to both provider and patient factors. A 5% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries from 1997 to 2007 was the data source. Data retrieved included demographic information, ICD-9 diagnosis codes, and CPT procedure codes. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify predictors of progression to implantable pulse generator (IPG) implantation. After stage I testing, urologists were more likely than gynecologists to proceed to IPG placement (Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services: 49% vs. 43%, p < 0.0001). After percutaneous testing, gynecologists were more likely than urologists to proceed to battery placement (63% vs.44%, p = 0.005). Among the patient variables analyzed, women were more likely than men to progress to battery placement. Patients treated by high-volume providers had higher rates of IPG placement after formal stage I trials (71% vs. 33%, p < 0.0001). The rate of IPG implantation after SNM was greater among high-volume providers. Women had better outcomes than men. Further research may better define the relationship between outcomes of sacral neuromodulation and specific etiology of voiding dysfunction.
    Neuromodulation 09/2013; · 1.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To develop a means to measure the quality of care provided to women treated for urinary incontinence (UI) through the development of quality-of-care indicators (QIs). We performed an extensive literature review to develop a set of potential quality indicators for the management of UI. QIs were modeled after those previously described in the Assessing the Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE) project. Nine experts ranked the indicators on a nine-point scale for both validity and feasibility. We analyzed preliminary rankings of each indicator using the RAND Appropriateness Method. A forum was then held in which each indicator was thoroughly discussed by the panelists as a group, after which the indicators were rated a second time individually using the same nine-point scale. QIs were developed that addressed screening, diagnosis, work-up, and both non-surgical and surgical management. Areas of controversy included whether routine screening for incontinence should be performed, whether urodynamics should be performed before non-surgical management is initiated, and whether cystoscopy should be part of the pre-operative work-up of uncomplicated stress incontinence. Following the expert panel discussion, 27 of 40 potential indicators were determined to be valid for UI with a median score of at least seven on a nine-point scale. We identified 27 quality indicators for the care of women with UI. Once these QIs are pilot-tested for feasibility, they will be applied on a larger scale to measure the quality of care provided to women with UI in the United States. Neurourol. Urodynam. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Neurourology and Urodynamics 09/2013; · 2.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine if prolapse symptom severity and bother varies among non-Hispanic white, Hispanic, and Native American women with equivalent prolapse stages on physical examination. This was a retrospective chart review of new patients seen in an academic urogynecology clinic from January 2007 to September 2011. Data were extracted from a standardized intake form, including patients' self-identified ethnicity. All patients underwent a Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POPQ) examination and completed the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory-20 (PFDI-20) with its Pelvic Organ Prolapse Distress Inventory (POPDI) subscale. Five hundred and eighty-eight new patients were identified with pelvic organ prolapse. Groups did not differ by age, prior prolapse, and/or incontinence surgery, or sexual activity. Based on POPDI scores, Hispanic and Native American women reported more bother compared with non-Hispanic white women with stage 2 prolapse (p < 0.01). Level of bother between Hispanic and Native American women with stage 2 prolapse (p = 0.56) was not different. In subjects with ≥ stage 3 prolapse, POPDI scores did not differ by ethnicity (p = 0.24). In multivariate stepwise regression analysis controlling for significant factors, Hispanic and Native American ethnicity contributed to higher POPDI scores, as did depression. Among women with stage 2 prolapse, both Hispanic and Native American women had a higher level of bother, as measured by the POPDI, compared with non-Hispanic white women. The level of symptom bother was not different between ethnicities in women with stage 3 prolapse or greater. Disease severity may overshadow ethnic differences at more advanced stages of prolapse.
    International Urogynecology Journal 06/2013; · 2.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Using a national data set, we sought to assess patterns of pessary care in older women with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and subsequent outcomes, including rates of complications and surgical treatment of POP. Public use files from the US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services were obtained for a 5% random national sample of beneficiaries from 1999 to 2000. Diagnostic and procedural codes (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification and Current Procedural Terminology, 4th Edition) were used to identify women with POP and those treated with pessary. Individual subjects were followed longitudinally for 9 years. Across this duration, patient care and outcomes (eg, return clinic visits, repeated pessary placements, complications, and rate of surgical treatment of prolapse) were assessed. Of 34,782 women with a condition diagnosed as POP, 4019 women (11.6%) were treated with a pessary. In the initial 3 months after pessary placement, 40% underwent a follow-up visit with the provider who had placed the pessary, and through 9 years after the initial fitting, 69% had such a visit. During this period, 3% of the subjects developed vesicovaginal or rectovaginal fistulas, and 5% had a mechanical genitourinary device complication. Twelve percent of women underwent surgery for POP by 1 year; with 24% by 9 years. Pessary can be effectively used for the management of POP in older women. Despite this, a low percentage of Medicare beneficiaries undergo pessary fitting. Lack of continuity of care is associated with a small but unacceptable rate of vaginal fistulas.
    Journal of Pelvic Medicine and Surgery 06/2013; 19(3):142-7.
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To describe trends in the surgical management of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in the United States from 2002 to 2007. METHODS: As part of the Urologic Diseases of America Project, we analyzed data from a 5% national random sample of female Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 and older. Data were obtained from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services carrier and outpatient files from 2002 to 2007. Women who were diagnosed with urinary incontinence identified by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition (ICD-9) diagnosis codes and who underwent surgical management identified by Current Procedural Terminology, Fourth Edition (CPT-4) procedure codes were included in the analysis. Trends were analyzed over the 6-year period. Unweighted procedure counts were multiplied by 20 to estimate the rate among all female Medicare beneficiaries. RESULTS: The total number of surgical procedures remained stable during the study period, from 49,340 in 2002 to 49,900 in 2007. Slings were the most common procedure across all years, which increased from 25,840 procedures in 2002 to 33,880 procedures in 2007. Injectable bulking agents were the second most common procedure, which accounted for 14,100 procedures in 2002 but decreased to 11,320 in 2007. Procedures performed in ambulatory surgery centers and physician offices increased, although those performed in inpatient settings declined. Hospital outpatient procedures remained stable. CONCLUSION: The surgical management of women with SUI shifted toward a dominance of procedures performed in ambulatory surgery centers from 2002 to 2007, although the overall number of procedures remained stable. Slings remained the dominant surgical procedure, followed by injectable bulking agents, both of which are easily performed in outpatient settings.
    Urology 05/2013; · 2.42 Impact Factor
  • Matthew E Pollard, Karyn S Eilber, Jennifer T Anger
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Abdominal sacrocolpopexy has been considered the gold standard for vaginal vault prolapse repair for several decades. Although transvaginal approaches gained popularity as minimally invasive alternatives, complications related to the use of vaginal mesh have led surgeons to perform these repairs less frequently. By incorporating laparoscopic and robotic techniques into the traditional open abdominal sacrocolpopexy, surgeons can offer the benefits of minimally invasive surgery while avoiding risks of vaginal mesh. This review article aims to evaluate the efficacy and outcomes of abdominal sacrocolpopexy by comparing open, laparoscopic, and robotic assisted laparoscopic surgery. RECENT FINDINGS: The excellent outcomes of open abdominal sacrocolpopexy have repeatedly been shown in published, randomized data. This has been further validated in minimally invasive techniques through randomized data evaluating the outcomes of laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy. Among the various sacrocolpopexy techniques, outcomes are similar among the open, laparoscopic, and robotic approaches. Minimally invasive surgeries have been shown to have advantages in terms of perioperative morbidity. SUMMARY: The superior outcomes of abdominal sacrocolpopexy are available using minimally invasive techniques for pelvic organ prolapse repair. Further research with randomized data is required to establish how these approaches compare to each other. Given the inherent advantages of minimally invasive surgery, robotic or laparoscopic abdominal sacrocolpopexy may become the preferred approach to abdominal pelvic organ prolapse repair.
    Current opinion in urology 05/2013; · 2.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: Since the first reported laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy in 1991, a limited number of single-center studies have attempted to assess the procedure's effectiveness and safety. Therefore, we analyzed a national Medicare database to compare real-world short-term outcomes of open and laparoscopically assisted (including robotic) sacrocolpopexy in a United States sample of patients. METHODS: Public Use File data for a 5 % random national sample of all Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 and older were obtained from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for the years 2004-2008. Women with pelvic organ prolapse were identified using ICD-9 diagnosis codes. CPT-4 procedure codes were used to identify women who underwent open (code 57280) or laparoscopic (code 57425) sacrocolpopexy. Individual subjects were followed for 1 year post-operatively. Outcomes measured, using ICD-9 and CPT-4 codes, included medical and surgical complications and re-operation rates. RESULTS: Seven hundred and ninety-four women underwent open and 176 underwent laparoscopic (including robotic) sacrocolpopexy. Laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy was associated with a significantly increased rate of re-operation for anterior vaginal wall prolapse (3.4 % vs 1.0 %, p = 0.018). However, more medical (primarily cardiopulmonary) complications occurred post-operatively in the open group (31.5 % vs 22.7 %, p = 0.023). When sacrocolpopexy was performed with concomitant hysterectomy, mesh-related complications were significantly higher in the laparoscopic group (5.4 % vs 0 %, p = 0.026). CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy resulted in an increased rate of reoperation for prolapse in the anterior compartment. When hysterectomy was performed at the time of sacrocolpopexy, the laparoscopic approach was associated with an increased risk of mesh-related complications.
    International Urogynecology Journal 05/2013; · 2.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: A paucity of data exists addressing the quality of care provided to women with pelvic organ prolapse (POP). We sought to develop a means of measuring this quality through the development of quality-of-care indicators (QIs). METHODS: QIs were modeled after those previously described in the Assessing the Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE) project. The indicators were then presented to a panel of nine experts. Using the RAND Appropriateness Method, we analyzed each indicator's preliminary rankings. A forum was then held in which each indicator was thoroughly discussed by the panelists as a group, after which panelists individually re-rated the indicators. QIs with median scores of at least 7 were considered valid. RESULTS: QIs were developed that addressed screening, diagnosis, work-up, and both nonsurgical and surgical management. Areas of controversy included whether screening should be performed to identify prolapse, whether pessary users should undergo a vaginal examination by a health professional every 6 months versus annually, and whether a colpocleisis should be offered to older women planning to undergo surgery for POP. Fourteen out of 21 potential indicators were rated as valid for pelvic organ prolapse (median score ≥7). CONCLUSION: We developed and rated 14 potential quality indicators for the care of women with POP. Once these QIs are tested for feasibility they can be used on a larger scale to measure and compare the care provided to women with prolapse in different clinical settings.
    International Urogynecology Journal 05/2013; · 2.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To better understand experts' perceptions of the definition of overactive bladder (OAB) and the evaluation and treatment of OAB in women. OAB has been defined by the International Continence Society as "urinary urgency, with or without urge urinary incontinence, usually with frequency and nocturia." Under the current definition, people with very different clinical conditions are included under the OAB umbrella. In the present study, 12 interviews with leading urologic, gynecologic, and geriatric practitioners in urinary incontinence and OAB were performed. Questions were asked about their perception and agreement with the current definition of OAB. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The grounded theory method was used to analyze the data. Overall, a great amount of variability was found in the definition and management of OAB. Four categories of definitions were derived from the qualitative analysis: the current OAB definition is adequate, OAB is a constellation of symptoms, OAB should include the fear of leakage, and OAB is a marketing term. Although some consensus has been reached on the evaluation, several areas have demonstrated disagreement over elements of the evaluation. Experts also believed that OAB is a chronic condition, with symptom variability, and has no cure. Managing patient expectations is essential, because OAB is challenging to treat. A focus was placed on behavioral therapy. The experts disagreed over the definition and workup of OAB. However, the experts agreed that OAB is a chronic condition with a low likelihood of cure.
    Urology 02/2013; 81(2):257-62. · 2.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent efforts in the generation of large genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and other types of 'omics' data sets have provided an unprecedentedly detailed view of certain diseases, however to date most of this literature has been focused on malignancy and other lethal pathological conditions. Very little intensive work on global profiles has been performed to understand the molecular mechanism of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome/bladder pain syndrome (IC/PBS/BPS), a chronic lower urinary tract disorder characterized by pelvic pain, urinary urgency and frequency, which can lead to long lasting adverse effects on quality of life. A lack of understanding of molecular mechanism has been a challenge and dilemma for diagnosis and treatment, and has also led to a delay in basic and translational research focused on biomarker and drug discovery, clinical therapy, and preventive strategies against IC/PBS/BPS. This review describes the current state of 'omics' studies and available data sets relevant to IC/PBS/BPS, and presents opportunities for new research directed at understanding the pathogenesis of this complex condition.
    International neurourology journal 12/2012; 16(4):159-68.
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: Little is known about women's experience with conservative management of pelvic organ prolapse. We sought to understand the experiences of Spanish-speaking women who choose a pessary. METHODS: Spanish-speaking women from a urogynecological pessary clinic were recruited for this study. Interviews were conducted and the women were asked about their pessary experience including questions involving symptom relief, pessary management, and quality of life. All interview transcripts were analyzed using the qualitative methods of grounded theory. RESULTS: Sixteen Spanish-speaking women who had been using a pessary for at least 1 month were enrolled in this study. Grounded theory methodology yielded several preliminary themes, in which one major concept emerged as a pessary adjustment process. In this process patients had to first decide to use a pessary, either because of physician's recommendations or out of personal choice. Second, the patients entered an adjustment period in which they learned to adapt to the pessary, both physically and mentally. Lastly, if the patients properly adjusted to wearing a pessary they experienced relief of bothersome symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate that Spanish-speaking women go through a process in order to adjust to a pessary. Furthermore, the physician plays a major role in not only determining a woman's decision to use a pessary, but also whether she can adjust to wearing the pessary. This process is most successful when patients receive comprehensive management from a healthcare team of physicians and nurses who can provide individualized and continuous pessary care.
    International Urogynecology Journal 12/2012; · 2.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose Overactive bladder is subtyped into overactive bladder-wet and overactive bladder-dry, based on the presence or absence, respectively, of urgency incontinence. To better understand patient and physician perspectives on symptoms among women with overactive bladder-wet and overactive bladder-dry, we performed patient focus groups and interviews with experts in urinary incontinence. Materials and Methods Five focus groups totaling 33 patients with overactive bladder symptoms, including 3 groups of overactive bladder-wet and 2 groups of overactive bladder-dry patients, were conducted. Topics addressed patient perceptions of overactive bladder symptoms, treatments and outcomes. A total of 12 expert interviews were then done in which experts were asked to describe their views on overactive bladder-wet and overactive bladder-dry. Focus groups and expert interviews were transcribed verbatim. Qualitative data analysis was performed using grounded theory methodology, as described by Charmaz. Results During the focus groups sessions, women screened as overactive bladder-dry shared the knowledge that they would probably leak if no toilet were available. This knowledge was based on a history of leakage episodes in the past. Those few patients with no history of leakage had a clinical picture more consistent with painful bladder syndrome than overactive bladder. Physician expert interviews revealed the belief that many patients labeled as overactive bladder–dry may actually be mild overactive bladder-wet. Conclusions Qualitative data from focus groups and interviews with experts suggest that a spectrum exists between very mild overactive bladder-wet and severe overactive bladder-wet. Scientific investigations are needed to determine whether urgency without fear of leakage constitutes a unique clinical entity.
    The Journal of urology 11/2012; 188(5):1811–1815. · 4.02 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

660 Citations
180.77 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011–2014
    • Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
      • Cedars Sinai Medical Center
      Los Angeles, California, United States
  • 2013
    • Virginia Mason Medical Center
      Seattle, Washington, United States
    • Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
      Manhattan, New York, United States
    • United BioSource Corporation
      Maryland, United States
    • University of New Mexico
      • Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology
      Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States
  • 2004–2013
    • University of California, Los Angeles
      • • Department of Urology
      • • Department of Medicine
      Los Angeles, California, United States
  • 2012
    • Loyola University Chicago
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Chicago, IL, United States
  • 2011–2012
    • University of Michigan
      • Department of Urology
      Ann Arbor, MI, United States
  • 2010
    • Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania
      • Division of Urology
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2009
    • The University of Arizona
      • Department of Surgery
      Tucson, AZ, United States
  • 2008–2009
    • University of Southern California
      Los Angeles, California, United States
    • Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
      • Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology
      Boston, MA, United States
    • Detroit Medical Center
      • Division of Urology
      Detroit, Michigan, United States
    • Children's Hospital Los Angeles
      • Division of Urology
      Los Angeles, California, United States
  • 2006
    • Duke University Medical Center
      • Division of Urology
      Durham, NC, United States
  • 2003–2004
    • Weill Cornell Medical College
      • Center for Male Reproductive Medicine and Microsurgery
      New York City, New York, United States
    • New York Presbyterian Hospital
      • Department of Urology
      New York City, New York, United States