Ingrid Chafsey

French National Institute for Agricultural Research, Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France

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Publications (10)35.55 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Defined as proteins actively transported via secretion systems, secreted proteins can have radically different subcellular destinations in monoderm (Gram-positive) bacteria. From degradative enzymes in saprophytes to virulence factors in pathogens, secreted proteins are the main tools used by bacteria to interact with their surroundings. The etiological agent of listeriosis, Listeria monocytogenes, is a Gram-positive facultative intracellular foodborne pathogen, whose ecological niche is the soil and as such should be primarily considered as a ubiquitous saprophyte. Recent advances on protein secretion systems in this species prompted us to investigate the exoproteome. First, an original and rational bioinformatic strategy was developed to mimic the protein exportation steps leading to the extracellular localization of secreted proteins; 79 exoproteins were predicted as secreted via Sec, 1 exoprotein via Tat, 4 bacteriocins via ABC exporters, 3 exoproteins via holins, and 3 exoproteins via the WXG100 system. This bioinformatic analysis allowed for defining a databank of the mature protein set in L. monocytogenes, which was used for generating the theoretical exoproteome and for subsequent protein identification by proteomics. 2-DE proteomic analyses were performed over a wide pI range to experimentally cover the largest protein spectrum possible. A total of 120 spots could be resolved and identified, which corresponded to 50 distinct proteins. These exoproteins were essentially virulence factors, degradative enzymes, and proteins of unknown functions, which exportation would essentially rely on the Sec pathway or nonclassical secretion. This investigation resulted in the first comprehensive appraisal of the exoproteome of L. monocytogenes EGD-e based on theoretical and experimental secretomic analyses, which further provided indications on listerial physiology in relation with its habitat and lifestyle. The novel and rational strategy described here is generic and has been purposely designed for the prediction of proteins localized extracellularly in monoderm bacteria.
    Journal of Proteome Research 08/2011; · 5.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Defined as proteins actively transported via secretion systems, secreted proteins can have radically different subcellular destinations in monoderm (Gram-positive) bacteria. From degradative enzymes in saprophytes to virulence factors in pathogens, secreted proteins are the main tools used by bacteria to interact with their surroundings. The etiological agent of listeriosis, Listeria monocytogenes, is a Gram-positive facultative intracellular foodborne pathogen, whose ecological niche is the soil and as such should be primarily considered as a ubiquitous saprophyte. Recent advances on protein secretion systems in this species prompted us to investigate the exoproteome. First, an original and rational bioinformatic strategy was developed to mimic the protein exportation steps leading to the extracellular localization of secreted proteins; 79 exoproteins were predicted as secreted via Sec, 1 exoprotein via Tat, 4 bacteriocins via ABC exporters, 3 exoproteins via holins, and 3 exoproteins via the WXG100 system. This bioinformatic analysis allowed for defining a databank of the mature protein set in L. monocytogenes, which was used for generating the theoretical exoproteome and for subsequent protein identification by proteomics. 2-DE proteomic analyses were performed over a wide pI range to experimentally cover the largest protein spectrum possible. A total of 120 spots could be resolved and identified, which corresponded to 50 distinct proteins. These exoproteins were essentially virulence factors, degradative enzymes, and proteins of unknown functions, which exportation would essentially rely on the Sec pathway or nonclassical secretion. This investigation resulted in the first comprehensive appraisal of the exoproteome of L. monocytogenes EGD-e based on theoretical and experimental secretomic analyses, which further provided indications on listerial physiology in relation with its habitat and lifestyle. The novel and rational strategy described here is generic and has been purposely designed for the prediction of proteins localized extracellularly in monoderm bacteria.
    Journal of Proteome Research 10/2010; 9(10):5076-92. · 5.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Staphylococcus xylosus is a Gram-positive bacterium found on the skin of mammals and frequently isolated from food plants and fermented cheese or meat. To gain further insight in protein determinants involved in biofilm formation by this coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, a comparative proteomic analysis between planktonic and sessile cells was performed. With the use of a protocol previously developed, protein patterns of the cytoplasmic and cell envelope fractions were compared by 2-DE. Following protein identification by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and bioinformatic analyses, this study revealed differences in expression levels of 89 distinct proteins with 55 up-expressed and 34 down-expressed proteins in biofilm compared to planktonic cells. Most proteins differentially expressed were related to nitrogen and carbon metabolisms. Besides amino acid biosynthesis and protein translation, protein determinants related to protein secretion were up-expressed in biofilm, suggesting a more active protein trafficking in sessile cells. While up-expression of several enzymes involved in pentose phosphate and glycolytic pathways was observed in biofilm, connections with unexpected metabolic routes were further unravelled. Indeed, this proteomic analysis allowed identifying novel proteins that could be involved in a previously uncovered exopolysaccharide biosynthetic pathway in S. xylosus as well as several enzymes related to polyketide biosynthesis. This findings are particularly relevant considering exopolysaccharide production in S. xylosus is ica-independent contrary to coagulase-negative model strain Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A.
    Journal of Proteome Research 05/2009; 8(4):1797-809. · 5.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Aims:  To investigate the effect of liquid smoke on growth, survival, proteomic pattern and haemolytic potential of Listeria monocytogenes.Methods and Results:  Growth and survival curves were recorded in brain–heart infusion broth supplemented with three concentrations of liquid smoke. L. monocytogenes growth was inhibited in the presence of 15 μg ml−1 phenol while a rapid decrease in cell viability occurred in the presence of 30 μg ml−1 phenol. The proteome of L. monocytogenes cytosoluble proteins was slightly modified after 2-h incubation with 30 μg ml−1 phenol but no protein already characterized in response to other known stresses was induced, except the protease ClpP. Liquid smoke inhibited the haemolytic potential without affecting hly gene expression, showing a potential inhibition of protein activity or stability.Conclusions:  The presence of liquid smoke in a rich medium strongly affected growth and survival of L. monocytogenes. Brief smoke stress affected the metabolic pathways and inhibited the haemolytic activity of L. monocytogenes.Significance and Impact of Study:  This study is a first step in the investigation of the influence of a smoked product on L. monocytogenes strains.
    Journal of Applied Microbiology 05/2008; 104(6):1744 - 1753. · 2.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Staphylococcus xylosus is a saprophytic bacterium commonly found on skin of mammals but also used for its organoleptic properties in manufacturing of fermented meat products. This bacterium is able to form biofilms and to colonize biotic or abiotic surfaces, processes which are mediated, to a certain extent, by cell-envelope proteins. Thus, the present investigation aimed at evaluating and adapting different existing methods for cell-envelope subproteome analyses of the strain S. xylosus C2a. The protocol selected consisted initially of a lysostaphin treatment producing protoplasts and giving a fraction I enriched in cell wall proteins. A second fraction enriched in membrane proteins was then efficiently recovered by a procedure involving delipidation with a mixture of tributyl phosphate, methanol, and acetone and solubilization with a buffer containing ASB14. Proteins were separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). A total of 168 protein spots was identified corresponding to 90 distinct proteins. To categorize and analyze these proteomic data, a rational bioinformatic approach was carried out on proteins identified within cell envelope of S. xylosus C2a. Thirty-four proteins were predicted as membrane-associated with 91% present, as expected, within fraction II enriched in membrane proteins: 24 proteins were predicted as membranal, 3 as lipoproteins, and 7 as components of membrane protein complex. Eighteen out of 25 (72%) proteins predicted as secreted were indeed identified in fraction I enriched in cell wall proteins: 6 proteins were predicted as secreted via Sec translocon, and the remaining 19 proteins were predicted as secreted via unknown secretion system. Eighty-one percent (25/31) of proteins predicted as cytoplasmic were found in fraction II: 8 were clearly predicted as interacting temporarily with membrane components. By coupling conventional 2-DE and bioinformatic analysis, the approach developed allows fractionating, resolving, and analyzing a significant and important set of cell envelope proteins from a coagulase-negative staphylococcus, that is, S. xylosus C2a.
    Journal of Proteome Research 10/2007; 6(9):3566-80. · 5.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Benzalkonium chloride (BC) is a commonly used disinfectant and preservative. This study describes changes in expression level at the transcriptomic and proteomic level for Escherichia coli K-12 gradually adapted to a tolerance level to BC of 7-8 times the initial MIC. Results from DNA arrays and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis for global gene and protein expression studies were confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. Peptide mass fingerprinting by MALDI-TOF MS was used to identify differentially expressed proteins. Changes in expression level in adapted cells were shown for porins, drug transporters, glycolytic enzymes, ribosomal subunits and several genes and proteins involved in protection against oxidative stress and antibiotics. Adapted strains showed increased tolerance to several antibiotics. In conclusion, E. coli K-12 adapted to higher tolerance to BC acquired several general resistance mechanisms, including responses normally related to the multiple antibiotic resistance (Mar) regulon and protection against oxidative stress. The results revealed that BC treatment might result in superoxide stress in E. coli.
    Microbiology 05/2007; 153(Pt 4):935-46. · 2.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the course of evolution, Gram-positive bacteria, defined here as prokaryotes from the domain Bacteria with a cell envelope composed of one biological membrane (monodermita) and a cell wall composed at least of peptidoglycan and covalently linked teichoic acids, have developed several mechanisms permitting to a cytoplasmic synthesized protein to be present on the bacterial cell surface. Four major types of cell surface displayed proteins are currently recognized: (i) transmembrane proteins, (ii) lipoproteins, (iii) LPXTG-like proteins and (iv) cell wall binding proteins. The subset of proteins exposed on the bacterial cell surface, and thus interacting with extracellular milieu, constitutes the surfaceome. Here, we review exhaustively the current molecular mechanisms involved in protein attachment within the cell envelope of Gram-positive bacteria, from single protein to macromolecular protein structure.
    FEMS Microbiology Letters 04/2006; 256(1):1-15. · 2.05 Impact Factor
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    FEMS Microbiology Letters 01/2006; 253(2):341 - 342. · 2.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, the role of Listeria monocytogenes ferritin was investigated. The fri gene encoding the ferritin was deleted and the phenotype of the mutant was analyzed demonstrating that ferritin is necessary for optimal growth in minimal medium in both presence and absence of iron, as well as after cold- and heat-shock. We also showed that ferritin provides protection against reactive oxygen species and is essential for full virulence of L. monocytogenes. A comparative proteomic analysis revealed an effect of the fri deletion on the levels of listeriolysin O and several stress proteins. Together, our study demonstrates that fri has multiple roles that contribute to Listeria virulence.
    FEMS Microbiology Letters 01/2006; 250(2):253 - 261. · 2.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of listeriosis, one of the most significant foodborne diseases in industrialized countries. The complete genome of the L. monocytogenes EGDe strain, belonging to the serogroup 1/2a, has been sequenced and is comprised of 2853 open reading frames. The objective of the current study was to construct a two-dimensional (2-D) database of the proteome of this strain. The soluble protein fractions of the microorganism were recovered either in the mid-log or in the stationary phase of growth at 37 degrees C. These fractions were analyzed by 2-D electrophoresis (2-DE), using immobilized pH gradient strips of various pH values (3-10, 3-6, and 5-8) for the first-dimensional separations and 12.5% acrylamide gels for sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). 201 protein spots corresponding to 126 different proteins were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The 2-DE maps presented here provide a first basis for further investigations of protein expression in L. monocytogenes. In this way, the comparison of proteome between cells in the exponential or stationary phase of growth at 37 degrees C allowed us to characterize 161 variations in protein spot intensity, of which 38 were identified. Among the differentially expressed proteins were ribosomal proteins (RpsF, RplJ, and RpmE), proteins involved in cellular metabolism (GlpD, PdhD, Pgm, Lmo1372, Lmo2696, and Lmo2743) or in stress adaptation (GroES and ferritin), a fructose-specific phosphotransferase enzyme IIB (Lmo0399) and different post-translational modified forms of listeriolysin (LLO).
    PROTEOMICS 11/2004; 4(10):3187-201. · 4.13 Impact Factor